I am looking for a free Ruby ide

I will like to learn ruby
and need some ide suggestions

Hi,

Personally, I use NetBeans. It does no longer support Ruby officially,
but there is a Ruby plugin maintained by the community.

Jacques

I use SciTE. Pretty simple text editor with colouring of code and F5
hotkey for running your code. I didn’t need to be learning a complicated
IDE on top of learning Ruby.

If I recall correctly SciTE is bundled with Ruby.

There’s a list of IDE’s on the Ruby site here:
http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/documentation/

Quoted from that link:
"Here is a list of popular tools used by Rubyists:

Linux and cross-platform tools:
    Aptana Studio
    Emacs with Ruby mode and Rsense
    Geany
    gedit
    Vim with vim-ruby plugin and Rsense
    RubyMine
    SciTe
On Windows:
    Notepad++
    E-TextEditor
    Ruby In Steel
On Mac OS X:
    TextMate
    TextWrangler"

I just released an IDE today. It uses GTK to create GUIs for Ruby. You
can watch a video of it here:

visualruby.net

It has the added advantage that you can build and publish gems too.

Best wishes,
Eric

Aptana Studio is good.

Netbeans used to be great for editing Ruby before Oracle bought out Sun
and cut the official support for Ruby in Netbeans.

I have started a petition which I hope we can hand to Oracle to ask them
to reinstate official Ruby support in Netbeans. Please consider adding
your name.

Here is the URL:
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/re-include-ruby-support-in-netbeans/

Hello,
visualruby.net looks nice. thanks Eric…

I’m working on Windows with Editra and a few plugins (code browser,
launcher, file browser,…) and it’s great to work with Ruby. (there’s
also Mac and Linux versions).

Is there a way to see how much memory is free for a Windows system
inside a Ruby Script? Sorry if this is a noob question.

Rick Carrick wrote in post #1119196:

Is there a way to see how much memory is free for a Windows system
inside a Ruby Script? Sorry if this is a noob question.

http://zhenghaoju700.blog.163.com/blog/static/135859518201207114342302/

require ‘ruby-wmi’
mem = WMI::Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory.find(:first)
puts "Available Memory: " + mem.AvailableMBytes + “M”

Joel P. wrote in post #1119200:

Rick Carrick wrote in post #1119196:

Is there a way to see how much memory is free for a Windows system
inside a Ruby Script? Sorry if this is a noob question.

http://zhenghaoju700.blog.163.com/blog/static/135859518201207114342302/

require ‘ruby-wmi’
mem = WMI::Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory.find(:first)
puts "Available Memory: " + mem.AvailableMBytes + “M”

Nice link… Thanks Joel.

Hi,

am installed ruby on my system, but while logging time am getting NO
SUCH FILE OR DIRECTORY(LOAD ERROR),please help me to resolve this issue.

On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 10:12:44 +0200, srinivasreddy.v s. wrote:

Hi,

am installed ruby on my system, but while logging time am getting NO
SUCH FILE OR DIRECTORY(LOAD ERROR),please help me to resolve this issue.

Attachments:
http://www.ruby-forum.com/attachment/8695/Untitled.jpg
http://www.ruby-forum.com/attachment/8696/Untitled1.jpg

In windows (which I don’t use) you do something like:

C:\ dir

this will list directory contents. is your hello_ruby.rb file there?

also:

C:\ type hello_ruby.rb

this will “print”, or type, the contents of your ruby script to the
console.

next, you highlight all the interesting bits. when it’s hightlighted,
it’s automagically copied to the clipboard. Paste that into an e-mail
or
something. Please don’t use screenshots.

Thufir

On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 08:20:48 +0000, thufir wrote:

next, you highlight all the interesting bits. when it’s hightlighted,
it’s automagically copied to the clipboard. Paste that into an e-mail
or something. Please don’t use screenshots.

Well, that’s not quite right. see:

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000805.htm

anyhow, the point is, please don’t use screenshots unless necessary.
Probably the ruby script your after is somewhere else.

good luck,

Thufir

This is what keeps me from really committing energy to Ruby, because
eventually I run into a situation where I want and IDE and there just
isn’t one. Oh well.

I’ll take another look at Geany, I recall that it has, or can be made to
work with, the ruby beautifier.

-Thufir

b1_ __ wrote in post #1050011:

Linux and cross-platform tools:

I’d like to comment on some of these because most are not fully IDE’s.

    Aptana Studio

Pretty extensive, you could say this is a full IDE. It includes
debugging support.

    Emacs with Ruby mode and Rsense

Emacs is an ancient and very powerful programmable text editor with
syntax highlighting but not an IDE.

    Geany

A simple text editor with some perks. It will do syntax highlighting and
has some support for projects.

    gedit

A simple text editor with syntax highlighting but no more.

    Vim with vim-ruby plugin and Rsense

Another ancient and very powerful programmable text editor like emacs,
can be made to do just about anything a text editor can do but with
quite a learning curve. Many people swear by Vim because they’ve learned
to be very efficient at it. You can get VI keybindings in many other
editors so you can do a combination - for example Sublime and RubyMine
can do that.

    RubyMine

This is a full featured Ruby IDE but it’s not free. You can evaluate it
for a month before you have to pay $99. It’s got everything you could
want - introspection, highlighting, refactoring support, database
support, efficient navigation. Frequently consumes 1GB of RAM on my
machine :). Very good for Rails work.

    SciTe

I’ve not used this much but I think its on the same level as Geany - a
text editor with some project support.

On Windows:
    Notepad++

Pretty good for a text editor, far better than Notepad! Still, not much
more than Geany.

    E-TextEditor

Never used this.

    Ruby In Steel

This is a plugin for Visual studio with some intellisense features. I’ve
not used it much.

On Mac OS X:
    TextMate
    TextWrangler

I’ve not used these but I have used Sublime Text which is similar.
Sublime is a powerful text editor that includes a ton of easy to install
plugins (like VIM) - but without the learning curve. It has excellent
navigation features so it’s pretty good for Rails work but doesn’t
understand Ruby code to the point RubyMine does, so it can’t quite
navigate as well… though it’s fuzzy file finder almost makes that a
non-issue.

Sublime is not free but you can manage to keep using it if you ignore
the nag screens. Still, it’s also not an IDE since it doesn’t have
debugging support or any real understanding of the code.

I know tools can become a fanboy fight, I’ve tried to be objective and I
hope I can people some time in trying all of these out. Feel free to
correct me or add your 2c. Some of these editors I’ve not used in some
time so YMMV. My most recent have been Vim, Sublime and RubyMine and I
highly recommend these.

On 29 August 2013 14:33, thufir [email protected] wrote:

This is what keeps me from really committing energy to Ruby, because
eventually I run into a situation where I want and IDE and there just
isn’t one. Oh well.

Seems odd to me. One of the great things about Ruby for me was that you
didn’t need an IDE. I work just fine with Vi and Textmate. When I was
programming Java an IDE was a must because the language was just so
verbose
(not just the amount of code that was written but also the number of
files
you ended up creating). I wouldn’t touch Java without an IDE but I have
never been in a situation where I was stuck in Ruby and thought “if only
I
had a proper IDE”.

What sort of situations are causing you problems that you believe that
an
IDE would solve?

As an aside the other programmers here swear by RubyMine :frowning:

On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 15:32:42 +0100, Peter H. wrote:

What sort of situations are causing you problems that you believe that
an IDE would solve?

I agree, it’s different. Partly because Java is statically typed.

A few things I like (about netbeans and Java) and wish I could do with
ruby:

API the Java API is right there, as you type you can see methods and
arguments, etc. I have a heck of a time looking up things in Ruby, go
to
the web, etc. Not sure that this could even be possible (?) given the
languages dynamic nature.

rename variable. very easy in Netbeans (and I’m sure, Eclipse et. al.)
and the changes will cascade correctly. Versus doing e a c h one by
hand…

beautify in Netbeans, it’s alt-shift-f to format, or beautify, the
code.

Those aren’t really “IDE” features per se, unless you count renaming a
class an IDE specific feature. I’m sure emacs can handle all that in a
jiffy. A good editor would suffice.

Start the editor wars! or just suggestions. I’ve just downloaded geany
and will get the beautifier gem working with it as a plugin, that’s most
of it there. It’s just a bit more awkward, hard to define, than using
Netbeans. Maybe when they perfect Jruby (never) It’ll be exactly what I
want :slight_smile:

ruby idiot,

Thufir

On 29 August 2013 15:56, thufir [email protected] wrote:

languages dynamic nature.

RubyMine does this. It is not a problem for dynamic languages. Smalltalk
had this feature from the get go. The whole ‘only possible with
statically
typed languages’ thing is complete BS.

rename variable. very easy in Netbeans (and I’m sure, Eclipse et. al.)

and the changes will cascade correctly. Versus doing e a c h one by
hand…

Variables being scoped to a class or method are easily changed in Vi or
Textmate. Method renaming is a little more of an issue. I use grep but
again RubyMine has got that covered too.

beautify in Netbeans, it’s alt-shift-f to format, or beautify, the code.

Again RubyMine does that, personally I just run it through a script that
someone posted to this list. Which can be done without leaving either Vi
or
TextMate.

On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 15:32:42 +0100, Peter H. wrote:

When I was programming Java an IDE was a must because the language was
just so verbos

Tell me about it. Java should die so that it can get replaced, instead
it just limps along. Using ivy to import packages is insane in
comparison to using gems and require – that alone makes ruby very
attractive.

-Thufir

On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 16:39:18 +0100, Peter H. wrote:

API the Java API is right there, as you type you can see methods and
arguments, etc. I have a heck of a time looking up things in Ruby, go
to the web, etc. Not sure that this could even be possible (?) given
the languages dynamic nature.

RubyMine does this. It is not a problem for dynamic languages. Smalltalk
had this feature from the get go. The whole ‘only possible with
statically typed languages’ thing is complete BS.

Ok, I wasn’t sure, thanks for clarifying.

Guess I’m just cheap and used to free tools. I might take RubyMine for
a
spin.

-Thufir

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