Yield question

Ruby beginner here.
I noticed the following code in the pickaxe book 1.9 page 101:

class VowelFinder
include Enumerable
def initialize(string)
@string = string
end
def each
@string.scan(/[aeiou]/) do |vowel|
yield vowel
end
end
end

What does it mean to have a yield inside a block? I thought yield is
the way a method calls the block. Here the only yield is inside a block
and there is no other method.

On Mon, Nov 5, 2012 at 1:10 PM, Assaf S. [email protected]
wrote:

yield vowel
end
end
end

What does it mean to have a yield inside a block? I thought yield is
the way a method calls the block. Here the only yield is inside a block
and there is no other method.

The yield is inside #each. It invokes the block passed to method #each.
Note this:

irb(main):001:0> def t; yield :pre; 2.times {|i| yield i}; yield :post;
end
=> nil
irb(main):002:0> t {|x| p x}
:pre
0
1
:post
=> :post

As you can see, yield invokes the block no matter where inside method #t
it
is placed.

Kind regards

robert

Got it. Thanks a lot guys for the quick response and succinct
explanation.

Assaf S. wrote in post #1082905:

Ruby beginner here.
I noticed the following code in the pickaxe book 1.9 page 101:

class VowelFinder
include Enumerable
def initialize(string)
@string = string
end
def each
@string.scan(/[aeiou]/) do |vowel|
yield vowel
end
end
end

What does it mean to have a yield inside a block?

‘yield’ calls a block. Which block? yield calls the block that
was specified when calling ‘the method’. Which method? The
method that contains the yield statement. So, work your way outwards
from the yield statement until you find a def statement. That is ‘the
method’ whose block will be called by yield.

A block that happens to be inside a method is not “the method’s
block”. The method’s block is specified when you call the method.
So if you see a block inside a method, you know for sure yield
is not calling that block.

Here the only yield is inside a block
and there is no other method.

If yield wasn’t allowed inside a block(e.g. a loop), which is inside a
method, then you would have to write methods like this:

def do_stuff
yield 0
yield 1
#…
#…
yield 998
yield 999
end

do_stuff {|x| puts x} #<—The method’s block

–output:–
1
2
998
999

But of course it makes sense to be able to do this:

def do_stuff
1_000.times {|i| yield i}
end

do_stuff {|x| puts x} #<— The method’s block

–output:–
0
1


998
999

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