YAML interpretation

I have one array in ruby as,

arr= [1, 2, ‘5’, ‘one’, ‘two’, ‘three’, “4,6”]

as after doing arr.to_yaml, it prints as,


  • 1
  • 2
  • “5”
  • one
  • two
  • three
  • “4,6”

This is my problem. It shows “4,6” as string (double-quoted) and
(one,two) are non-quoted which itself as string. I am passing this
string to some else database program which need clear distinction
between string and integer.

I require the result set as,


  • 1
  • 2
  • “5”
  • “one”
  • “two”
  • “three”
  • “4,6”

Does yaml have any provision so that i can achieve the result set in
above consistent format?

On Jul 23, 2009, at 01:27 , Karan R. wrote:

  • one

above consistent format?
yaml only provides the extra characters when the result would be
ambiguous. “- one” can’t be seen as anything other than an array
element with the string one in it. “- 4,6” is ambiguous, so yaml
provides the extra quotes to disambiguate. I suggest you use a real
yaml parser instead of relying on regexps and duct tape. The spec is
well written and very clear about such things.

Ryan D. wrote:

On Jul 23, 2009, at 01:27 , Karan R. wrote:

  • one

above consistent format?
yaml only provides the extra characters when the result would be
ambiguous. “- one” can’t be seen as anything other than an array
element with the string one in it. “- 4,6” is ambiguous, so yaml
provides the extra quotes to disambiguate. I suggest you use a real
yaml parser instead of relying on regexps and duct tape. The spec is
well written and very clear about such things.

Hi Ryan,

Thanks for suggestion. But I am not clear about real yaml parser. As i
am using yaml package in ruby.

Could you please elaborate?

On Thu, Jul 23, 2009 at 11:35 AM, Karan R.[email protected]
wrote:

yaml parser instead of relying on regexps and duct tape. The spec is
well written and very clear about such things.

Hi Ryan,

Thanks for suggestion. But I am not clear about real yaml parser. As i
am using yaml package in ruby.

What is the other person’s database program using to process the file?
(“regexps and duct tape” or “a real yaml parser”)

On Jul 23, 2009, at 04:35 , Karan R. wrote:

yaml parser instead of relying on regexps and duct tape. The spec is
well written and very clear about such things.

Hi Ryan,

Thanks for suggestion. But I am not clear about real yaml parser. As i
am using yaml package in ruby.

Could you please elaborate?

As you said: “I am passing this string to some else database program
which need clear distinction between string and integer”

SOMEONE is not using a real yaml parser… since yaml DOES have a
clear distinction between strings and integers.

unknown wrote:

What is the other person’s database program using to process the file?
(“regexps and duct tape” or “a real yaml parser”)

Other database program expecting only the string, like,


  • 1
  • 2
  • “5”
  • “one”
  • “two”
  • “three”
  • “4,6”

Its treats as the “string”, not the “yaml string”.

On Jul 23, 2009, at 22:36 , Karan R. wrote:

Thanks for suggestion. But I am not clear about real yaml parser.

  • 1
  • 2
  • “5”
  • “one”
  • “two”
  • “three”
  • “4,6”

Its treats as the “string”, not the “yaml string”.

then the database program is wrong. the yaml is correct. you should
fix what is wrong, not what is correct.

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