Xx-2.0.0


#1

NAME

xx

SYNOPSIS

xhtml and xml generation => twice as dirty!

USAGE

require “xx”

include XX::XHTML

doc = xhtml_{
html_{
head_{ title_{ " go xx! " } }
body_{ " one more and it would be illegal " }
}
}

puts doc

INSTALL

harp:~ > gem install “double x”

URIS

http://rubyforge.org/projects/codeforpeople/
hhtp://codeforpeople.com/xx/

DESCRIPTION

xx is a library designed to extend ruby objects with html, xhtml, and
xml
generation methods. the syntax provided by xx aims to make the
generation
of xml or xhtml as clean looking and natural as ruby itself, while
still
being entirely robust and safe.

the approach taken, that of extending objects, allows natural
document
generation while preserving access to instance data. in essence it
provides
ruby objects (including the top level ‘main’ object) mixin ability to
generate various markup views of their data in a way that is correct
and
elegant.

xx is brought to you by the good folks at http://eparklabs.com.

SAMPLES

<========< samples/a.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/a.rb

 require "xx"
 include XX::XHTML
 #
 # xx modules extend any object with natural document markup 

methods. the
# special ‘tag_name_(attributes){ block }’ is a bit odd first but,
as you will
# see, has many important properties
#

 puts xhtml_{
   html_{
     head_{ title_{ " go xx! " } }
     body_{ " one more 'x' and it would be illegal " }
   }
 }

~ > ruby samples/a.rb

     <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" 

http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd”>


go xx!

one more ‘x’ and it would be illegal

<========< samples/b.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/b.rb

 require "xx"
 #
 # xx doesn't name clash
 #
 class C
   include XX::XHTML

   attr 'body'

   def initialize
     @body = 'body'
   end

   def to_html
     xhtml_{ html_{ body_{   body   } } }
   end
 end

 puts C.new.to_html

~ > ruby samples/b.rb

     <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" 

http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd”>

body

<========< samples/c.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/c.rb

 require "xx"
 #
 # no reserved words prohibiting tags - oh, and xml too.  also note 

the
# blockless form of tag generation which is also supported
#
class C
include XX::XML

   attr 'table'

   def initialize
     @table = %w( a b c ), %w( 1 2 3 )
   end

   def to_xml
     xml_{
       class_{ self.class }
       object_id_{ 42 }
       send_ 'send'
       exit_ 'exit'

       table_{
         table.each do |row|
           tr_{
             row.each do |cell|
               td_ cell
             end
           }
         end
       }
     }
   end
 end

 puts C.new.to_xml.pretty # auto indentation with 'pretty'

~ > ruby samples/c.rb

     <?xml version='1.0'?>
     <class>C<object_id>42</object_id>
       <send>send</send>
       <exit>exit</exit>
       <table>
         <tr>
           <td>a</td>
           <td>b</td>
           <td>c</td>
         </tr>
         <tr>
           <td>1</td>
           <td>2</td>
           <td>3</td>
         </tr>
       </table>
     </class>

<========< samples/d.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/d.rb

 require "xx"
 #
 # the brackets make it dang easy to bounce on the '%' key (or 

whatever key
# matches braces in your editor) to balance tags. and the phrase
‘_{’ is very
# useful for searching huge doccuments for tag generation methods
#
class C
include XX::XML

   def to_xml
     xml_{ a_{ b_{ c_{ d_{ e_{ f_{ '  but am i balanced?  ' }}}}}}} 

vim will tell you!

   end
 end

 puts C.new.to_xml

~ > ruby samples/d.rb

 <?xml version='1.0'?><a><b><c><d><e><f> but am i balanced? 

<========< samples/e.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/e.rb

 require "xx"
 #
 # the handy '_' method can bail you out when your tags aren't valid 

ruby
# syntax
#

 include XX::XML

 puts xml_{ _('mething missing is cool'){ 'but not always the best 

fit’ } }

~ > ruby samples/e.rb

 <?xml version='1.0'?><mething missing is cool>but not always the 

best fit</mething missing is cool>

<========< samples/f.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/f.rb

 require "xx"
 #
 # '_' really bails you out for namespaces
 #
 module Furniture
   class Table
     include XX::XML

     attr 'legs'

     def initialize
       @legs = %w[ 1 2 3 4 ]
     end

     def to_xml
       xml_{
         _('furniture:table', 'xmlns:f' => 

http://www.w3schools.com/furniture’){
legs.each{|leg|
_(‘furniture:leg’){ “leg #{ leg }” }
}
}
}
end
end
end

 #
 # xml types don't get formatted by default - use pretty for that
 #
 puts Furniture::Table.new.to_xml.pretty

~ > ruby samples/f.rb

     <?xml version='1.0'?>
     <furniture:table xmlns:f='http://www.w3schools.com/furniture'>
       <furniture:leg>leg 1</furniture:leg>
       <furniture:leg>leg 2</furniture:leg>
       <furniture:leg>leg 3</furniture:leg>
       <furniture:leg>leg 4</furniture:leg>
     </furniture:table>

<========< samples/g.rb >========>

~ > cat samples/g.rb

 require "xx"
 #
 # there are bunch of shorthand methods - each is 'escaped' via a 

double
# underscore
#
include XX::XHTML
include XX::XML

 puts xml_{ t__{ 'this is text data' } }
 puts xml_{ x__{ '<xml> in raw form, nothing is auto-escaped </xml>' 

} }
puts xml_{ h__{ ’ entities like & are ignored ’ } }
puts xml_{ c__{ ‘cdata’ } }
puts xml_{ tag_(a__(‘k=v, x=y’)){ ‘a__ is a handy attribute parser’
} }
puts xml_{ tag_(y__(‘k: v, a: b’)){ ‘y__ is too - yaml style’ } }

~ > ruby samples/g.rb

 <?xml version='1.0'?>this is text data
 <?xml version='1.0'?><xml> in raw form, nothing is auto-escaped 
<?xml version='1.0'?> entities like & are ignored <?xml version='1.0'?> <?xml version='1.0'?>a__ is a handy attribute parser <?xml version='1.0'?>y__ is too - yaml style

HISTORY

2.0.0:

 - !!!!!!! NOT BACKWARD COMPATIBLE WITH 1.X.X VERSIONS !!!!!!!

 _ the special method '_' can now be used to generate any tag

     _(:td, :width => 600, :height => 400){ 'content' }

   this enables xml namespaces!

     xml_{

       _('furniture:table', 'xmlns:f' => 

http://www.w3schools.com/furniture’){



}

     }

 - all the special escaping class of methods have been changed from 

one to
two underscores

     g_ => g__  ## tag generator, now same as '_'
     t_ => t__  ## xml text node generator
     x_ => x__  ## raw xml, no escaping
     h_ => h__  ## escaped only html entities
     c_ => c__  ## cdata
     a_ => a__  ## parse attribute string
     y_ => y__  ## parse yaml attribute string

   as you can see, this is consistent with the new '_' tag 

generation: any
method ending with one underscord is a generator. all methods
ending in
two are special methods.

   this is the major compatibilty breaker.  sorry, but the new 

method is
much more consistent and less typing.

 - fixed bug with rexml changes in 1.8.5 regarding order of sending 

doc
preamble

0.1.0:
- added the “g_” method, which generates any tag
^
g_(“anytag”, “key” => “value”){ b_{ “bold” } }

 - added at_ and att_ methods to parse yaml and k=v strings as 

hashes.

     at_("src : image.jpg, width : 100%")

       #=> {"src"=>"image.jpg", "width"=> "100%"}

0.0.0:
- initial version

AUTHORS

dan fitzpatrick removed_email_address@domain.invalid
ara.t.howard removed_email_address@domain.invalid

BUGS

please send bug reports to /dev/null. patches to addresses above.
:wink:

LICENSE

ePark Labs Public License version 1 Copyright © 2005, ePark Labs,
Inc. and
contributors All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
are met:

 1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright 

notice,
this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

 2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above 

copyright notice,
this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
documentation
and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

 3. Neither the name of ePark Labs nor the names of its contributors 

may be
used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
without
specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS
“AS IS”
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE
LIABLE
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE
GOODS OR
SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
LIABILITY,
OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF
THE USE
OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

-a


#2

On 2/16/07, removed_email_address@domain.invalid removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

NAME

xx

For some reason I want a Mexican beer at lunch now :wink:

Clever use of method missing, though. Can this package generate XML
tags that contain a dash ‘-’ character?

TwP


#3

Sort of reminds me of Markaby:
http://markaby.rubyforge.org/


#4

On Feb 16, 2007, at 11:11 AM, Tim B. wrote:

Sort of reminds me of Markaby:
http://markaby.rubyforge.org/

Or Builder:

http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/builder/

James Edward G. II


#5

On Sat, 17 Feb 2007, James Edward G. II wrote:

On Feb 16, 2007, at 11:11 AM, Tim B. wrote:

Sort of reminds me of Markaby:
http://markaby.rubyforge.org/

Or Builder:

http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/builder/

safer than the first, easier than the second, and does both :wink:

-a


#6

On 2/16/07, removed_email_address@domain.invalid removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

For some reason I want a Mexican beer at lunch now :wink:

puts doc.pretty

cheers.

So simple! The XML namespace example should have clued me in – need
more coffee.

As Tim B. mentioned, this is a lot like Markaby, but it fixes some
of Markaby’s shortcomings – mainly support for valid XML tag
characters not currently allowed in method_missing and/or symbols.

Thanks Ara. Thanks Dan.

TwP


#7

On Sat, 17 Feb 2007, Tim P. wrote:

Clever use of method missing, though. Can this package generate XML
tags that contain a dash ‘-’ character?

TwP

harp:~ > cat a.rb
require “xx”
include XX::XML

legs = 1,2,3,4

doc = xml_{
_(‘furniture:table’){
legs.each do |leg|
_ “furniture:leg-#{ leg }”, leg
end
}
}

puts doc.pretty

harp:~ > ruby a.rb
<?xml version='1.0'?>
furniture:table
furniture:leg-11</furniture:leg-1>
furniture:leg-22</furniture:leg-2>
furniture:leg-33</furniture:leg-3>
furniture:leg-44</furniture:leg-4>
</furniture:table>

cheers.

-a


#8

On Sat, 17 Feb 2007, Trans wrote:

def element( tag, body=nil, atts={} )

builder.html do
h1 “Hello World”, :class=>“big”
end

produces

“<h1 class=“big”>Hello World”

right, but with that approach, or that of markaby, tags like ‘p’, ‘id’,
‘size’, et all are clobbered. with builder they’ve solved this by
making the
user pass the builder to all blocks, but that’s a lot of typing!

-a


#9

On Feb 16, 12:34 pm, “Tim P.” removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

xx
include XX::XML

cheers.

So simple! The XML namespace example should have clued me in – need
more coffee.

As Tim B. mentioned, this is a lot like Markaby, but it fixes some
of Markaby’s shortcomings – mainly support for valid XML tag
characters not currently allowed in method_missing and/or symbols.

markaby has #tag! which is same as #_ however (AFAICT) markaby does
html, not xml.

the builder pattern is pretty common now. Facets has a class one can
use to build any kind you’d like called BuildingBlock. you simply
apply a helper object for specially defined “tags” and the method to
use as the default. Very basic example:

require ‘facets/more/buildingblock’

module BasicXMLMarkup
extend self

def element( tag, body=nil, atts={} )
  atts = atts.collect{ |k,v| %{ #{k}="#{v}"} }.join('')
  if body
    "<#{tag}#{atts}>#{body}</#{tag}>"
  else
    "<#{tag}#{atts} />"
  end
end

end

builder = BuildingBlock.new(BasicXMLMarkup, :element)

builder.html do
h1 “Hello World”, :class=>“big”
end

produces

“<h1 class=“big”>Hello World”

BuildingBlock is not limited to XML type markups. you can use
BuildingBlock to make other types of builders too. an Outline bulder
for instance should be pretty easy (you can use the to_roman method :wink:

T.


#10

On Feb 16, 2:06 pm, removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

html, not xml.

builder = BuildingBlock.new(BasicXMLMarkup, :element)
‘size’, et all are clobbered. with builder they’ve solved this by making the
user pass the builder to all blocks, but that’s a lot of typing!

Well, that’s partly true. BuildingBlock removes all but a few methods,
so ‘p’, ‘id’, and ‘size’ are fine. In any case, while the underscore
notation you present is the least clobbering of all of them, in the
end there are always some cases that one must use the special call for
(eg, #_ or #tag!). it’s just a matter of little more or a little less,
and a few extra feautres along the way (for example, markaby can
calsses added more easily: h1.big “Hello World”). btw, i think markaby
is built ontop of builder too, oddly enough.

anyway, i’m not trying to be argumentative or anything. i’m just
saying that I think, on the whole, each of these solutions about as
good as any other.

T.


#11

On Sat, 17 Feb 2007, Trans wrote:

anyway, i’m not trying to be argumentative or anything. i’m just saying that
I think, on the whole, each of these solutions about as good as any other.

abosolutely! i’m just stating the reasons i went ahead and did
something
slight different so people have the context to make choices.

cheers.

-a