XML output (urgent)

Hi all,

t = {‘type’ => ‘abc’, ‘numbers’ => {‘number’ => [333], ‘src’ => ‘glasses’}}
=> {“type”=>“abc”, “numbers”=>{“number”=>[333], “src”=>“glasses”}}

puts XmlSimple.xml_out({“policyDetails” => t},{“KeepRoot” => true})


333

Can you please give me a hint that how to output the xml likes below …

puts XmlSimple.xml_out({“policyDetails” => t},{“KeepRoot” => true})

333

Many thanks.

I’m not familiar with XmlSimple, but may I suggest Nokogiri?

On Jul 20, 10:13 pm, Hv Mai [email protected] wrote:

Can you please give me a hint that how to output the xml likes below …

puts XmlSimple.xml_out({“policyDetails” => t},{“KeepRoot” => true})

333

The trick with XmlSimple is that it can round-trip. In other words,
you can perform xml_in() on the output you want and you’ll see exactly
what you need for xml_out() to produce it.

so, you can do this:

require ‘xmlsimple’
data = ’
333

xml = XmlSimple::xml_in(data, {“KeepRoot” => true})

p xml

and you’ll get

{“policyDetails”=>[{“type”=>“abc”, “numbers”=>[{“src”=>“glasses”,
“content”=>“333”}]}]}

and therefore, if you perform xml_out on the above like so:

data = {“policyDetails”=>[{“type”=>“abc”, “numbers”=>
[{“src”=>“glasses”, “content”=>“333”}]}]}
puts XmlSimple::xml_out(data, {“KeepRoot” => true})

you get:

333

…exactly what you want.

– Mark.

P.S. I hadn’t used XmlSimple before, but the docs on the xml_out
method say “If the resulting XML is parsed using xml_in, it will
return a data structure equivalent to the original.” so I realized the
above trick would work.

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