Windows File Comparing

I am attempting to right a small utility that checks one file against
an automated snapshot of itself in a different location to make sure
that they are the same. I have not had any luck doing this and thought
I would present this to the group to see if you can help me out.

So far when I execute my code everything that is not an actual file
("." and “…”) shows as OK but, anything else shows as not equal.
I have tried this using several different things like File1.size ==
File2.size and also what you see in the code listed below. Neither
seem to give me a result showing that these files are equal.

If I were to look in windows explore at these 2 files and look at the
file sizes, they both look identical so I am not sure what it is that
*.size is looking at to show that they aren’t the same size.

Can anyone advise me on how I can better implement this? Also how I
can get rid of the “.” files in the directory

My code so far is as below:

require ‘fileutils’
require ‘ftools’

y = Dir.entries("\\C:\BNADataFile\")
z = Dir.entries("\\F\BNADataFile\.snapshot\hourly.0\")

y.each do |y|
z.each do |z|
if(FileUtils.uptodate?(y,z))
puts y + “: Snapshot Successful”
else
puts y + “: Not the same”
end
end
end

My results: (Not sure why “…” showed up so many times)

C:\Documents and Settings\lmcilwain\My Documents\scripts\work>ruby
check.rb
.: Not the same
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
…: Snapshot Successful
backup: Not the same
Archived…cdb: Not the same
OPInc…cdb: Not the same
ArchivedAlt.cdb: Not the same
Alts.cdb: Not the same
event.log: Not the same

Lovell Mcilwain wrote:

I am attempting to right a small utility that checks one file against
an automated snapshot of itself in a different location to make sure
that they are the same. I have not had any luck doing this and thought
I would present this to the group to see if you can help me out.

You can use File#directory? to test if an entry is a directory (.,… are
directory)

tiziano

My results: (Not sure why “…” showed up so many times)

You’re taking files in y and comparing them to every file in z.

Change:

       puts y + ": Not the same"

to

       puts y + ": Not the same as :" + z

and I think you’ll see what I mean.

Hope that helps.

Gordon

i suppose a lot of this depends on how heavy-weight you want this to
be. something more reliable would be a SHA1 of the contents of the
file-

require ‘digest/sha1’

def content_hash(path)
digest = Digest::SHA1.new
File.open(path, ‘rb’) do |file|
while buffer = file.read(1048576) do
digest << buffer
end
end
return digest.hexdigest
end

it also depends on what exactly you want to be doing with it- this
will create a signature for the file contents that you can use to
compare against another. if all you care about is checking whether a
file has changed or not, and the files are located on an NTFS
partition and you really don’t like the .folder, you could use
alternate data streams (ADS):

def write_signature(path, signature)
open(path + “:signature_stream”, “w”) {|f| f.write(signature}
end

this will effectively hide the signature. you could potentially
duplicate the contents into a stream, but that would not be an
effective use- if the duplication is for versioning or backups, loss
of the file will also result in loss of the stream and, thus, the
backup. if you are running this as a service, you could just use a
simple db to contain the path + signature and use that as your check.

i would recommend using something like SHA1 to check the contents- far
more reliable the size, ctime, or mtime. if the files are fairly
small, it won’t be too costly. regardless, caching the signature of
the copy in either an ads or a database will save time- you’ll only
need to create the signature of the original file and compare it to
the cached sig of the copy:

class FileCompObj
attr_reader :path, :signature
def initialize(path, signature = nil)
@path = path
@signature = signature ? signature : content_hash(path)
end

def ==(file)
@signature == file.signature
end

def content_hash(path)
digest = Digest::SHA1.new
File.open(path, ‘rb’) do |file|
while buffer = file.read(1048576) do
digest << buffer
end
end
return digest.hexdigest
end
end

a simple convenience class like that would allow you to do something
like this:

include methods defined above

path, backup_path = ARGV[0], ARGV[1]
original = FileCompObj.new(path)

grab sig from ads or db, then pass it along

backup = FileCompObj.new(backup_path, signature)

if original == backup
puts “Same”
else
puts “Different”
end

a rather lengthy reply. while no animals were harmed in the creation
of this message, i haven’t test the code yet, so no guarantees. scan
for bugs first!

tom

Vell wrote:

Can anyone advise me on how I can better implement this?

Is this just because you want to do it it Ruby?
A quick search should turn up various implementations of diff that will
take two
directories and recursively compare the contents.

On Jan 15, 7:39 pm, Reid T. [email protected] wrote:

Vell wrote:

Can anyone advise me on how I can better implement this?

Is this just because you want to do it it Ruby?
A quick search should turn up various implementations of diff that will take two
directories and recursively compare the contents.

No this did not have to be in Ruby, I only chose to do it in Ruby so
that I can get better at Ruby. Its the only language that I have them
most experience in. I never bothered to search around for any other
things.

i suppose a lot of this depends on how heavy-weight you want this to be.
something more reliable would be a SHA1 of the contents of the file-

require ‘digest/sha1’

def content_hash(path)
digest = Digest::SHA1.new
File.open(path, ‘rb’) do |file|
while buffer = file.read(1048576) do
digest << buffer
end
end
return digest.hexdigest
end

it also depends on what exactly you want to be doing with it- this will
create a signature for the file contents that you can use to compare
against another. if all you care about is checking whether a file has
changed or not, and the files are located on an NTFS partition and you
really don’t like the .folder, you could use alternate data streams
(ADS):

def write_signature(path, signature)
open(path + “:signature_stream”, “w”) {|f| f.write(signature}
end

this will effectively hide the signature. you could potentially
duplicate the contents into a stream, but that would not be an effective
use- if the duplication is for versioning or backups, loss of the file
will also result in loss of the stream and, thus, the backup. if you
are running this as a service, you could just use a simple db to contain
the path + signature and use that as your check.

i would recommend using something like SHA1 to check the contents- far
more reliable the size, ctime, or mtime. if the files are fairly small,
it won’t be too costly. regardless, caching the signature of the copy
in either an ads or a database will save time- you’ll only need to
create the signature of the original file and compare it to the cached
sig of the copy:

class FileCompObj
attr_reader :path, :signature
def initialize(path, signature = nil)
@path = path
@signature = signature ? signature : content_hash(path)
end

def ==(file)
@signature == file.signature
end

def content_hash(path)
digest = Digest::SHA1.new
File.open(path, ‘rb’) do |file|
while buffer = file.read(1048576) do
digest << buffer
end
end
return digest.hexdigest
end
end

a simple convenience class like that would allow you to do something
like this:

include methods defined above

path, backup_path = ARGV[0], ARGV[1]
original = FileCompObj.new(path)

grab sig from ads or db, then pass it along

backup = FileCompObj.new(backup_path, signature)

if original == backup
puts “Same”
else
puts “Different”
end

a rather lengthy reply. while no animals were harmed in the creation of
this message, i haven’t test the code yet, so no guarantees. scan for
bugs first!

tom

----- Original Message -----
From: “Vell” [email protected]
To: “ruby-talk ML” [email protected]
Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2008 2:54:04 PM (GMT-0700) America/Denver
Subject: Windows File Comparing

I am attempting to right a small utility that checks one file against
an automated snapshot of itself in a different location to make sure
that they are the same. I have not had any luck doing this and thought
I would present this to the group to see if you can help me out.

So far when I execute my code everything that is not an actual file
("." and “…”) shows as OK but, anything else shows as not equal.
I have tried this using several different things like File1.size ==
File2.size and also what you see in the code listed below. Neither
seem to give me a result showing that these files are equal.

If I were to look in windows explore at these 2 files and look at the
file sizes, they both look identical so I am not sure what it is that
*.size is looking at to show that they aren’t the same size.

Can anyone advise me on how I can better implement this? Also how I
can get rid of the “.” files in the directory

My code so far is as below:

require ‘fileutils’
require ‘ftools’

y = Dir.entries("\\C:\BNADataFile\")
z = Dir.entries("\\F\BNADataFile\.snapshot\hourly.0\")

y.each do |y|
z.each do |z|
if(FileUtils.uptodate?(y,z))
puts y + “: Snapshot Successful”
else
puts y + “: Not the same”
end
end
end

My results: (Not sure why “…” showed up so many times)

C:\Documents and Settings\lmcilwain\My Documents\scripts\work>ruby
check.rb
.: Not the same
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
.: Snapshot Successful
…: Snapshot Successful
backup: Not the same
Archived…cdb: Not the same
OPInc…cdb: Not the same
ArchivedAlt.cdb: Not the same
Alts.cdb: Not the same
event.log: Not the same

On Jan 15, 6:20 pm, Tiziano M. [email protected] wrote:


Posted viahttp://www.ruby-forum.com/.

I will give that a shot, I believe I did put an if statement in there
with File#Directory since I don’t need to check the directories just
the files but I ended up getting an error that I didn’t post. I will
try it again and post my error if it still bombs on me.

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