Whitestone 1.0.2

Whitestone 1.0.1, a unit testing library, was released on 2012-01-02.
This
update, 1.0.2, improves the implementation of float-equality testing,
especially regarding numbers near zero. As it stands, floats are
considered
equal if their 14th significant figure is off by one. There is no
provision
for specifying a tolerance: it is supposed to just work, and if it
doesn’t
then it’s a bug.

Key features of Whitestone include terse testing code, colorful and
helpful output, custom assertions, a powerful and intuitive test
runner, simple debugger integration. The homepage explains and
demonstrates it well.

Here are the assertion methods:
T – assert true
F – assert false
N – assert object is nil
Eq – assert two objects are equal
Mt – assert string matches regular expression
Id – assert two objects are identical (same object)
E – assert error is raised
Ko – assert an object is kind_of a class/module
Ft – assert two floats are essentially equal
C – assert object is thrown

Homepage: http://gsinclair.github.com/whitestone.html
Code: http://github.com/gsinclair/whitestone
Licence: MIT

Regards,
Gavin

Key features of Whitestone include terse testing code, colorful and
helpful output, custom assertions, a powerful and intuitive test
runner, simple debugger integration. The homepage explains and
demonstrates it well.

I just skimmed the homepage; what do you think are the primary
pros/cons wrt minitest?

How well does it work on Windows, specifically the col gem?

http://gsinclair.github.com/col.html#windows_users

Note the win32console deprecation notice at
https://github.com/luislavena/win32console and advocacy for
https://github.com/adoxa/ansicon

Interesting output report style, any way to make it minimalist via a cmd
line option or config?

Jon

On Sat, Jan 28, 2012 at 3:38 AM, Jon F. [email protected]
wrote:

Key features of Whitestone include terse testing code, colorful and
helpful output, custom assertions, a powerful and intuitive test
runner, simple debugger integration. The homepage explains and
demonstrates it well.

I just skimmed the homepage; what do you think are the primary
pros/cons wrt minitest?

I wrote the key features with test/unit in mind because that’s what I
was used to for years. Minitest may have implemented some of those; I
don’t know. The only con I can think of is “not being a standard” but
that doesn’t bother me.

If I have to pick primary features then it’s the first two:

  • terse testing code (I hate typing in lots of code to test things,
    and want the focus to be on the code being tested)
  • colorful and helpful output (it gives a lot of information on
    failures and errors and is easy to read)

If those features are matched by other testing libraries, I’m not
aware of it. But there are many of them, so …

How well does it work on Windows, specifically the col gem?

http://gsinclair.github.com/col.html#windows_users

Good question. I develop on Mac and when I use Ruby on Windows, it’s
under Cygwin, which masks the Windows-compatibility problem. I’ll
look more into it.

Note the win32console deprecation notice at
https://github.com/luislavena/win32console and advocacy for
https://github.com/adoxa/ansicon

Thanks for the pointer. I’ll see if I can integrate it ASAP.

Interesting output report style, any way to make it minimalist via a cmd
line option or config?

No. Wouldn’t be hard to implement, but it’s not something I’ve
desired. I know minimalist output (or better yet, some standardised
yaml output or similar) is good for tapping into other products, like
continuous integration servers etc. But that hasn’t been relevant to
me so far.

Like many projects, it’s designed to suit me perfectly :slight_smile:

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs