What is your favourite IDE?

I prefer using eclipse for it’s freedom, ruby and svn plugins etc. But
the big problem now is, debuggin does not work anymore after v. 3.2
and a solution seems to be quite some time away and rdb is a little
unhandy for a lazy type like me…

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

ChrisKaelin wrote:

I prefer using eclipse for it’s freedom, ruby and svn plugins etc. But
the big problem now is, debuggin does not work anymore after v. 3.2
and a solution seems to be quite some time away and rdb is a little
unhandy for a lazy type like me…

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

NetBeans and the command line.


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski
http://cynicalryan.110mb.com/
http://clothred.rubyforge.org

Rule of Open-Source Programming #7:

Release early, release often. Clean compilation is optional.

Hi,

Am Donnerstag, 12. Apr 2007, 19:55:09 +0900 schrieb ChrisKaelin:

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

Vim, Bash.

Bertram

ms notepad and command line.23-83-4f28-49-en.html

On 4/12/07, ChrisKaelin [email protected] wrote:

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

Emacs for coding. I find that debuggers are frequently useless and
almost always more trouble than they are worth, so I generally debug
with unit tests and, when necessary, puts().

2007/4/12, ChrisKaelin [email protected]:

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

vim, bash, grep, less, …

John M. wrote:

2007/4/12, ChrisKaelin removed_email_address[email protected]:

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

vim, bash, grep, less, …

  • sed

Emacs+ecb, etc.

ChrisKaelin wrote:

I prefer using eclipse for it’s freedom, ruby and svn plugins etc. But
the big problem now is, debuggin does not work anymore after v. 3.2
and a solution seems to be quite some time away and rdb is a little
unhandy for a lazy type like me…

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

My favorite IDE is the one I get paid to use, and my favorite
programming language is the one I get paid to use as well. But since I
don’t get paid to program in Ruby, perhaps my opinion isn’t relevant.
For Ruby programming, I have two IDEs – the Linux desktop and Komodo
(the paid version). But if you like KDE and don’t mind locking yourself
out of Windows and Macs, KDevelop is awesome!


M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC§
http://borasky-research.net/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.

IntelliJ IDEA and their Ruby plugin.

TextMate by far.


Jeremy T.
[email protected]

KOMODO Edit!!!

For rails
http://support.activestate.com/forum-topic/ruby-on-rails-toolbox

and svn duct tape (still very alpha)
http://svn.stephenbeckeriv.com/code/komodo/extensions/

I am working on a ruby toolbox.
Stephen B. IV

ChrisKaelin wrote:

I prefer using eclipse for it’s freedom, ruby and svn plugins etc. But
the big problem now is, debuggin does not work anymore after v. 3.2
and a solution seems to be quite some time away and rdb is a little
unhandy for a lazy type like me…

So what IDE do you prefer in order to code and to debug ruby?

Although some will argue what an IDE is, I’ll assume the looser meaning.

I use TextMate, irb, and bash/command line; I’m very happy with that
setup.

Avdi G. wrote:

Emacs for coding. I find that debuggers are frequently useless and
almost always more trouble than they are worth, so I generally debug
with unit tests and, when necessary, puts().

I agree with that, there are cases when a debugger is useful, but not
very often. It’s too easy to use the debugger as a crutch, and not
write assertions or unit tests. In Ruby, I often open the unit test
file and the file I’m working on at the same time, and then I use
TextMate’s “Run Focused Unit Test” command to test it as I’m coding.

To run little snippets of code, I use either irb (which I always have
open) or I use TextMate’s “Execute Selection as Ruby”, which is cool.

I’ve never coded in it, but the way people describe the IDEs used for
SmallTalk sounds intriguing to me. If you could integrate irb into
TextMate, that would be very nice, indeed.

“Kyle S.” [email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Interestingly the SciTE webpage shows intellisense type stuff for
python and other languages. I wonder how to get that working in
ruby…

We already have IntelliSense (I don’t mean just ‘code completion’ but
real
analytical IntelliSense that knows about class ancestry, scope, mixins,
singletons, etc.) in Ruby In Steel Developer. In answer to your question
on
how to get that working in Ruby: it’s very, very difficult. We had to
write
what amounts to a background Ruby interpreter to analyse code as it is
being
entered. Suffice to say, it wasn’t a trivial undertaking :wink:

You might like to watch our short screencast for a simple demo:
http://www.sapphiresteel.com/Ruby-In-Steel-Movies

Some more info here: http://www.sapphiresteel.com/IntelliSense

best wishes
Huw C.

http://www.sapphiresteel.com
Ruby P.ming In Visual Studio 2005

I still use SciTE.

I started using EditPlus, and quickly ran from it to freeRide.
For awhile I used freeRide (is that poor project abandoned now?) but I
had to give up after too many crashes. Despite it all, I really liked
it.
Tried Eclipse, and found it to be a great editor, but clunky when it
came to running & debugging ruby code from within it.
I wanted to try the netbeans stuff but haven’t gotten around to it.
Jedit didn’t really seem to work all that well, maybe it’s just personal
taste?

SciTE doesn’t have a debugger, but it’ll run ruby code from within it,
hop to errors, show output etc.
It’s got an annoyingly small number of tabs available, but usually
it’s enough.
The text highlighting is good, and it’ll collapse loops methods and
classes pretty well. Pretty well, not perfectly.

Oooh, and it’s never crashed on me. I can’t say that about freeRide
(hourly) or even eclipse (though rare).

Interestingly the SciTE webpage shows intellisense type stuff for
python and other languages. I wonder how to get that working in
ruby… That would make it about the best ruby IDE currently
available. Yes eclipse/netbeans may be fuller, but SciTE is tiny and
light weight.

–Kyle

Hi,

Haven’t tried it yet, but I read on a blog about Eclipse DLTK. They’ve
got IntelliSense working for Ruby in Eclipse. So this means free
cross-platform IntelliSense! A screencast can be found here:

http://us.xored.com/~haiodo/EclipseCon07/dltk-ruby.mov

Regards,

Peter

Peter C. Verhage wrote:


got IntelliSense working for Ruby in Eclipse. So this means free
cross-platform IntelliSense! A screencast can be found here:

One note: IntelliSense is simply Microsoft’s branding of a host of
features such as code-completion (which is all it was originally in VB
5, then they added more to it later). The term is trademarked by
Microsoft.

I see a lot of people say something like “it is more than code
completion, it’s IntelliSense”. Many IDEs have similar, or even better,
features than MS does with their IntelliSense. They just can’t call it
that for legal reasons.

“Todd W.” [email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Peter C. Verhage wrote:
I see a lot of people say something like “it is more than code
completion, it’s IntelliSense”. Many IDEs have similar, or even better,
features than MS does with their IntelliSense. They just can’t call it
that for legal reasons.

Bear in mind also that IntelliSense means on-the-fly code analysis. It
isn’t
just code completion. Many IDEs provide code completion based on simple
alphabetical lists or using method names declared in the current code
file.
That is a long way from IntelliSense. To provide IntelliSense, you need
to
interpret the code - not only the code that’s being edited, but also
also
any changes that editing changes might introduce going right up the
class
hierarchy. In other words, a real IntelliSense system is an interpreter,
not
just a ‘method-lookup’ tool.

We’ve put a great deal of effort into Ruby In Steel’s IntelliSense
system
and you might therefore understand why we are a little sensitive to
other
IDE’s claims to IntelliSense when what they generally mean is ‘code
completion’ :wink:

best wishes
Huw C.

http://www.sapphiresteel.com
Ruby P.ming In Visual Studio 2005

Hello Huw,

Eclipse DLTK also do a lot of things while computing code completion
proposals like abstract interpreting of Ruby code, demand driven
analysis with subgoals pruning, searching for refs, etc… But DLTK
folks still calling this “Code Assist” (Eclipse-way). You referring to
the same feature as “IntelliSense” (MS-way)… I believe it does not
matters a lot for an IDE user how process of getting completion
proposals named: IntelliSense, Code Assist, or Code Complete.
Implementation and results quality does matter, so are you ready for
real open challenge to prove that your IntelliSense is better than
DLTK’s Code Assist (completion)? If you definitely ready, I believe DLTK
guys will be happy to meet the challenge.

Kind Regards,
Andrey Platov

Is anyone using Activestate’s Kodomo? I know activestate is a player in
the perl community but I don’t know much about the ruby world.

thanks
vlad

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