What do you use with Ruby for GUI programming and why?

Is there a push to one toolkit or the other?

Am 11.03.2011 03:30, schrieb Robert:

Is there a push to one toolkit or the other?


Robert

Just yesterday I posted on this list because of a spreadsheet that had a
quite good comparison between the various toolkits available for Ruby
(see http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/217287 ), but sadly, that
spreadsheet is still lost…

Vale,
Marvin

I use Shoes. I’m biased; I’m one of the maintainers.

I use Shoes. I’m biased; I’m one of the maintainers.

That’s interesting. I rather thought that you had to think of Shoes as
a seperate language, almost. Do you ever find that the Shoes syntax
ever gets in the way of writing good old-fashioned Ruby code? Or is that
a stupid thing to say?

I fell in love with Shoes when _Why produced it, but I was seduced away
to try and learn a “proper” toolkit (GTK, in fact). What would you say
the limits of Shoes were?

<shameless_plug>
freightrain -> http://github.com/bolthar/freightrain is an MVC framework
over
GTK+ and other toolkits. It makes the job much easier than having to
deal
directly with ruby/GTK… give it a try :slight_smile:
</shameless_plug>

Andrea

I like green_shoes.

I am just learning ruby. And find that just requireing ‘green_shoes’ and
start experimenting is easy and fun.

Eelco

On Mar 11, 2011, at 8:25 AM, Quintus wrote:

(see http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/217287 ), but sadly, that
spreadsheet is still lost…

Vale,
Marvin

FWIW, I’m using FxRuby with no real problems. It’s been easy to install
and limited testing shows it to be cross-platform code-compatible
(tested on OS X Snow Leopard and Windows 7). Haven’t tried it on my
Ubuntu system yet, but ‘real soon now’.
The fact that there’s a book in support of it was admittedly a factor –
I’m still learning Ruby and the associated packages…

cheers,
Bill

On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 10:04 PM, Andrea D.
[email protected] wrote:

<shameless_plug>
freightrain -> http://github.com/bolthar/freightrain is an MVC framework over
GTK+ and other toolkits. It makes the job much easier than having to deal
directly with ruby/GTK… give it a try :slight_smile:
</shameless_plug>

Looks very interesting, but the docs are a bit scanty!

martin

Or is that a stupid thing to say?

Shoes is just Ruby, with a lot of library on top. That said, the way
it’s
currently distributed is almost as a separate language, so your
intuition is
almost right. _why described it as a ‘toolkit.’

As far as the limitations of Shoes:

  • gems with native extensions are Right Out. Unless you want to make
    your
    own pair of shoes.
  • Shoes is currently Ruby 1.9.1, so it’s missing a lot of 1.9.2 goodies.
  • Packaging is still a bit borked on OSX.

That said, we’re looking to address all of this. One aspect is the
green_shoes project, which you can find at http://green.shoesrb.com/ .
It’s
true, the docs are a bit sparse, and it doesn’t really work on OSX yet.
But
it’s a mostly-compatible Shoes that’s written in all Ruby.

Another thing: I haven’t talked about this much publicly yet, but I’m in
the
process of turning Red Shoes (the classic, _why shoes) into a regular
old
Gem. This means you’d be able to use it with your regular Ruby, and all
of
your other gems.

Anyway, Shoes as a project is still strong and kicking, and we’re
working to
address remaining issues. :smiley:

On Thu, Mar 10, 2011 at 8:30 PM, Robert [email protected] wrote:

Is there a push to one toolkit or the other?

JRuby plus either Swing or SWT (possibly using one of the Ruby
wrappers/DSLs/APIs around them) is really hard to beat. Nothing to
compile, works consistently across platforms. You ship Ruby code alone
(Swing) or Ruby plus a couple pre-built backends (SWT) and you’re
done.

https://github.com/jruby/jruby/wiki/GUIFrameworks

The RedCar editor (redcareditor.com) is a great example of a solid,
awesome app written with JRuby and SWT, and there’s a number of other
commercial users of JRuby + SWT or Swing.

  • Charlie

Shoes is far and away the easiest and most pleasant way to get a GUI
that I’ve seen - in any language. I’m a bit worried about having to
drop back to 1.9.1, and I sure miss the Linux installer. But I
absolutely have to try Green Shoes, though.

Good luck with the project. I’ll be looking on with fingers crossed…

Robert wrote in post #986825:

Is there a push to one toolkit or the other?

I’ve used Tk for a long while now, and while I’ve found it’s sometimes
hard to install, I’ve found it to work very seamlessly with ruby. I
wouldn’t suggest jumping into graphics if you don’t already know how to
do basic programming, but if your at that point then I would highly
recommend Tk. You’ll probably want to find a tutorial on how to install
it on your system (you may need to install Tcl/Tk from
http://www.activestate.com/) look at this guide for all your graphic
needs: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/ruby/ruby_tk_guide.htm

Tk is cross-platform and pre-installed in a lot of installers for Ruby.
I’ve found it a lot easier to learn then other toolkits…

-Jesse

Hi Eric,

Where is the web page that lists the various colors of Shoes?
Look at “A Rainbow of Shoes”-- http://blog.shoesrb.com/archive

what is Red written in?
Red Shoes is written in both C and Ruby.

Cheers,
ashbb

On Sat, Mar 12, 2011 at 8:30 AM, Shadowfirebird
[email protected] wrote:

Shoes is far and away the easiest and most pleasant way to get a GUI that I’ve
seen - in any language. I’m a bit worried about having to drop back to 1.9.1, and
I sure miss the Linux installer. But I absolutely have to try Green Shoes, though.

Good luck with the project. I’ll be looking on with fingers crossed…

Where is the web page that lists the various colors of Shoes? I can’t
seem to find it. In particular, I’m wondering what’s special about
Green – it says it’s “pure Ruby”, but then what is Red written in?

Where is the web page that lists the various colors of Shoes? I can’t
seem to find it. In particular, I’m wondering what’s special about
Green – it says it’s “pure Ruby”, but then what is Red written in?

I wrote a bunch of blog posts about the various shoes-es on the Shoes
blog:
http://blog.shoesrb.com/tagged/Rainbowshoes

We haven’t been talking about all of them super-publically yet because
most
of them are still in the ‘super ultra alpha’ phase. The two big ones are
Red
and Green: Red is _why’s original code, it’s a combination of C and Ruby
that uses native widgets on all platforms. Green is a project started by
ash
to write an all-Ruby shoes, that uses Ruby’s own bindings to GTK.
Unfortunately, you need X11 on the Mac to run apps with it, but it works
natively on Linux and Windows.

I myself still use ruby-gtk / ruby-gnome.

What got me into it is actually the nice documentation and the many
examples.

I am a slow learner and I absolutely need documentation.

What ruby-gtk would need would be more ruby guys with good knowledge in
C. I would have the time to help but unfortunately my C knowledge just
is not good enough to really send in patches and help the maintainers.
:frowning:

Hi Shadowfirebird,

Shoes is far and away the easiest and most pleasant way to get a GUI
that I’ve seen - in any language.
True! I totally agree. :smiley:

I absolutely have to try Green Shoes
Wow, fantastic!
If you have any troubles, questions or suggestions, feel free let us
know
in Shoes ML: http://librelist.com/browser/shoes/

Good luck with the project. I’ll be looking on with fingers crossed…
Thanks! Let’s have fun with colorful Shoes!! :smiley:

ashbb

Is there a push to one toolkit or the other?

Here’s one comparison of toolkits:
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/GUI_Toolkit_Modules

I currently just use straight swing wrapper with jruby (wrapped to be
ruby friendlier). Unfortunately there’s no clear winner, AFAIK.
-r

Surprised no one has mentioned Fxruby and Wxruby.

there is also a frontend fui builder for fxruby called fxoGUIb written
by henon (it uses fxruby bindings).

I use it with 1.8.7 (get some error codes appear that don’t come up with
1.8.6 but doesn’t stop it running).

pro’s

cross platform but you have to change the widget placement sometimes
when using foxGUIb but that’s not too bad.

you can create you’re GUI really fast and then subclass you’re event
handling code behind it to make it run.

con’s

no longer in developement (fxruby or foxGUIb but are MIT or GPL so
anyone could take these up and run with them again).

can be a bugger to get foxGUIb going when you start out.

not tried using either on a mac.

Wxruby not used but think it’d be similar to fxruby.

HTH

dave.

On Sat, Mar 12, 2011 at 7:59 PM, Roger P. [email protected]
wrote:

Is there a push to one toolkit or the other?

Here’s one comparison of toolkits:
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/GUI_Toolkit_Modules

I currently just use straight swing wrapper with jruby (wrapped to be
ruby friendlier). Unfortunately there’s no clear winner, AFAIK.

Roger, is that wrapper input_form?

A few months ago I learned of Monkeybars and had planned to learn it,
but I haven’t gotten around to it. I’m still wondering what the
advantages of it (or other wrappers) over raw Swing are.

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