Warnings

So I was running my specs with -w the other day, and noticed a lot of
warnings being produced. Some of these appear to be coming from RSpec
internals, which is an issue in its own right but not the subject of
this email. What I’m asking about right now is this. Given an
example of the form:

@foo.should == 42

Running the spec with ruby -w produces a warning to the effect that
I’m “making a comparison in a void context”. Now, this is a perfectly
reasonable warning anywhere but in an RSpec spec. My question is: is
anyone running RSpec with -w turned on, and if so, how are you
avoiding warnings of this nature?


Avdi

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On Dec 16, 2008, at 5:17 PM, Avdi G. wrote:

reasonable warning anywhere but in an RSpec spec. My question is: is
anyone running RSpec with -w turned on, and if so, how are you
avoiding warnings of this nature?

I haven’t noticed any.

Post a bug report on lighthouse, with full backtrace and error
message, ruby (& rails version), rspec version, and OS.

Scott

On Tue, Dec 16, 2008 at 11:46 PM, Scott T.
[email protected]wrote:

Running the spec with ruby -w produces a warning to the effect that
I’m “making a comparison in a void context”. Now, this is a perfectly
reasonable warning anywhere but in an RSpec spec. My question is: is
anyone running RSpec with -w turned on, and if so, how are you
avoiding warnings of this nature?

Ruby gives a warning because the result of the == isn’t stored anywhere.
If
you do

x = @foo.should == 42

The waring is gone. There isn’t much we can do about it - it’s how Ruby
decides to warn.

Aslak

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