Using the current method name within current method

Is there a way to get the current method name within the current method?

def test_method
puts self.current_method
end

— output ----
test_method

Thanks,
Matt

On Jul 30, 2006, at 11:37 PM, Matthew Heidemann wrote:

Is there a way to get the current method name within the current
method?

def test_method
puts self.current_method
end

— output ----
test_method

In 1.9 (Ruby CVS HEAD) there is #method and #callee: http://
eigenclass.org/hiki.rb?Changes+in+Ruby+1.9#l90

– Daniel

This is kindof a hack, but it seems to work:

def get_mname
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/ # note the first quote is a backtick
$1
end

def dinosaur
puts get_mname
end

dinosaur()
=> ‘dinosaur’

If you wanted to modularize it just for the sake of it, you could do
something similar to the following:

module CurrentMethodName
def this_method
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/
$1
end
end

And, then, use it like this:

class Foo
include CurrentMethodName
def bar
this_method
end
end

Hope this cleans it up a bit for you. It’s a holdover until 1.9.

M.T.

Matt T. wrote:

If you wanted to modularize it just for the sake of it, you could do
something similar to the following:

module CurrentMethodName
def this_method
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/
$1
end
end

You can rewrite that as

def this_method
caller[0][/`([^’]*)’/, 1]
end

and thusly avoid the global variable.

Kind regards

robert

As much as I’d like to take credit for knowing its superior speed, I
can’t as I stole it from Aleks. :slight_smile:

However, I did know that $1 wasn’t a true global in the sense of the
term, but a magic variable specific to the regexp test. It’s commonly
acceptable, and, hey, if it’s faster, why not, right?

A side note: this is one of the first things I’ve worked with that I
decided to make into something that was includable… It’s a
milestone in my way of thinking and coding with Ruby! Yay! (Sorry, had
to tell someone!)

Cheers!

M.T.

Logan C. wrote:

end
Kind regards

robert

I have a sneaking suspicion he might have done it with the global
variable (although $1 isn’t really global) on purpose, since =~
/literal/ is the fastest way to do a regexp.

I did a benchmark just to put some meat to this:

13:37:39 [Temp]: ./bm.rb
Rehearsal --------------------------------------------
global 1.859000 0.000000 1.859000 ( 1.863000)
String[] 2.156000 0.000000 2.156000 ( 2.180000)
----------------------------------- total: 4.015000sec

            user     system      total        real

global 1.828000 0.000000 1.828000 ( 1.872000)
String[] 2.094000 0.000000 2.094000 ( 2.172000)

IOW, the global var version uses 87,3% of the time or is 15% faster.

Kind regards

robert

On Jul 31, 2006, at 4:25 AM, Robert K. wrote:

You can rewrite that as

I have a sneaking suspicion he might have done it with the global
variable (although $1 isn’t really global) on purpose, since =~ /
literal/ is the fastest way to do a regexp.

Aleks Kissinger wrote:

Depending on how you feel about mucking with core ruby types, a method
like this one seems like a decent candidate for mixing in to Object.

class Object
def this_method
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/
$1
end
end

These methods are typically put into Kernel and made private. Also, you
don’t check whether the RX actually matches. I’d also prefer to change
the RX to a more efficient one. So that would give

module Kernel
private
def this_method
caller[0] =~ /`([^’]*)’/ and $1
end
end

Kind regards

robert

Depending on how you feel about mucking with core ruby types, a method
like this one seems like a decent candidate for mixing in to Object.

class Object
def this_method
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/
$1
end
end

Course I’m one of those crazy irb hack loving people that mixes
convenience methods into everything…

Matt T. wrote:

If you wanted to modularize it just for the sake of it, you could do
something similar to the following:
module CurrentMethodName
def this_method
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/
$1
end
end

Robert K. wrote:

These methods are typically put into Kernel and made private. Also, you
don’t check whether the RX actually matches. I’d also prefer to change
the RX to a more efficient one. So that would give

module Kernel
private
def this_method
caller[0] =~ /`([^’]*)’/ and $1
end
end

Kind regards

robert

Excellent! I was searching for this for a long time. ‘what method called
this method’ or ‘how to find out which method called this method ?’

So, here’s one:

module Kernel
private
def this_method
caller[0] =~ /([^']*)'/ and $1 end def calling_method caller[1] =~ /([^’]*)’/ and $1
end
end

Example:

def a
b
end

def b
puts "this method: " + this_method
puts "calling method: " + calling_method
end

calling ‘a’ will output
this method: b
calling method: a

Thx!

2010/3/10 Ace S. [email protected]:

def this_method
private
def a
calling method: a
Wow, you just reviewed a 3.5 year old thread! :slight_smile:

Btw, nowadays I would change the regular expression matching to use
String#[] which I find much more elegant:

def this_method
caller[0][/`([^’]*)’/, 1]
end

Kind regards

robert

I like that much better. That seems to fit in with the rest of how
Ruby works. Well done. Also, thanks for improving the RX efficiency: I
see how that would be a bit more efficient.

M.T.

On Wed, Mar 10, 2010 at 9:29 AM, Robert K.
[email protected] wrote:

2010/3/10 Ace S. [email protected]:
I would leave Kernel (and Object ) alone for that

module Whatever
end

mix it in where and when you want. Ok that is a matter of taste but
gives you a less intrusive way

Cheers
R

Reviving thread again: I’d use method

In terms of original example.

def test_method
puts method
end

Maybe method didn’t exist in 2006 (too lazy to check, maybe its

=1.8.7), in 2010 it definitely did :wink:

Using caller does give me the name of the calling method, but there is
no reference to what module or class that method belonged to. Is that
possible to obtain?

def get_mname
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/ # note the first quote is a backtick
$1
end

def dinosaur
puts get_mname
puts method(get_mname).owner
end

dinosaur

–output:–
dinosaur
Object

eT Ma wrote in post #988662:

Reviving thread again: I’d use method

In terms of original example.

def test_method
puts method
end

Maybe method didn’t exist in 2006 (too lazy to check, maybe its

=1.8.7), in 2010 it definitely did :wink:

I’m writing plugins for SketchUp which uses Ruby 1.8.6. method does
not exist there.

Using caller does give me the name of the calling method, but there is
no reference to what module or class that method belonged to. Is that
possible to obtain?

7stud – wrote in post #1083904:

Using caller does give me the name of the calling method, but there is
no reference to what module or class that method belonged to. Is that
possible to obtain?

def get_mname
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/ # note the first quote is a backtick
$1
end

def dinosaur
puts get_mname
puts method(get_mname).owner
end

dinosaur

–output:–
dinosaur
Object

There is no Method#owner in Ruby 1.8.6.

And I don’t understand how it would have worked anyway - determining the
class/method a method belongs to given just a string with the method
name? If you have two classes, Foo and Bar - each each method #biz - how
would method(‘biz’).owner returned the correct caller?

7stud – wrote in post #1083904:

Using caller does give me the name of the calling method, but there is
no reference to what module or class that method belonged to. Is that
possible to obtain?

def get_mname
caller[0]=~/`(.*?)’/ # note the first quote is a backtick
$1
end

def dinosaur
puts get_mname
puts method(get_mname).owner
end

dinosaur

–output:–
dinosaur
Object

Guys, FYI caller doesn’t give meaningful data about method when the
method is called from a bare file, e.g. a Cucumber Step definition.
Instead of giving

common_steps.rb:42:in `some_method_or_other’ …

it gives

common_steps.rb:42:in `block in <top (required)>’ …

For these situations you’re better off using method and
self.name.to_s if you also need the class in which the method is
contained.

HTH,

Dermot

On Thu, May 16, 2013 at 7:32 PM, Dermot C. [email protected] wrote:

Guys, FYI caller doesn’t give meaningful data about method when the
method is called from a bare file, e.g. a Cucumber Step definition.

What exactly distinguishes a “bare file” from ordinary ruby code?

contained.
You could as well just look at the next item in the list and use that:

$ ruby -e ‘def f;p caller(1);end;f;1.times {f}’
["-e:1:in <main>'"] ["-e:1:inblock in '", “-e:1:in times'", "-e:1:in'”]

Kind regards

robert

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