Using loop to add items to array

Hi,

I’m trying to find all rows in database where ‘title’ is a substring
of my specified string. That means if my string is “whatever”, then I
want all rows with title being “whateve”, “whatev”, “whate”, “what”.
etc.

Here’s the function:

def self.superiors(currentitem)

@array = []
s = currentitem.title
charcount = (s.index('-')-1)..(s.length-1)

for i in charcount
  this = s[0..i]

  found = General.find(:all, :conditions => ["title = ?", this])
  @array << found
end

return @array

end

if I return ‘found’ it works, but of course returns the last value
found. but returning @array doesn’t. it seems that I’m just doing
something wrong with the arrays?

Thanks for any help.

u can try like this

found = General.find(:all, :conditions => [“title =?”,’%#{this}%’])
or
General.find(:all, :conditions => [“title=?”,"’%’"+this+"’%’"])

:slight_smile:

oops a small modification

General.find(:all, :conditions => [“title=?”,"’%"+this+"%’"])
On Sat, Jun 21, 2008 at 3:23 PM, bala kishore pulicherla <

pepa007 wrote:

Hi,

I’m trying to find all rows in database where ‘title’ is a substring
of my specified string. That means if my string is “whatever”, then I
want all rows with title being “whateve”, “whatev”, “whate”, “what”.
etc.

Here’s the function:

def self.superiors(currentitem)

@array = []
s = currentitem.title
charcount = (s.index('-')-1)..(s.length-1)

for i in charcount
  this = s[0..i]

  found = General.find(:all, :conditions => ["title = ?", this])
  @array << found
end

return @array

end

if I return ‘found’ it works, but of course returns the last value
found. but returning @array doesn’t. it seems that I’m just doing
something wrong with the arrays?

Thanks for any help.

Hm, if I understand correctly, you are wanting to do the reversal of a
standard database LIKE search. So, in normal conditions, you’d be doing
something like

select * from some_table where some_field like ‘%some_string%’

I just did a quick test on PostgreSQL, and you can do something like

select * from some_table where ‘some_string’ like ‘%’ || some_field ||
'%"

I have a table that lists sports (baseball, football, soccer, etc) and I
did the following query

select * from available_sports where ‘SoccerMom’ ilike ‘%’ || name ||
‘%’

and it returned ‘Soccer’ as I expected it to.

Note that || is the string concatenation operator in Postgres.
Depending on your database server, you might also consider using a
case-insensitive operator, which is ilike in Postgres.

Doing it in the database, you will only have one query. Using the method
you are trying now, you will have a query for every variation of the
search string.

Peace,
Phillip

wow, pretty close, thanks! I didn’t know I can switch parameters in
LIKE clause this way…

BUT! I’m using MySql not Postgre and || operator means OR in MySql so
the result of your query is very different in MySql :slight_smile: Using
CONCAT(title,’%’) didn’t work but don’t know why. just returned no
results.

HOWEVER, it helped me find the solution which is REGEXP function

so my query looks like SELECT * FROM ‘generals’ WHERE ‘^title’ REGEXP
‘whatever’

and the RoR function looks like

def self.superiors(currentitem)
@found = General.find_by_sql(“SELECT * FROM generals WHERE
'^”+currentitem.title+"’ REGEXP title")
end

it seems to do exactly what I want, but it’s much shorter…

On Jun 21, 1:51 pm, Phillip K. [email protected]

bala’s suggestion is correct if you’d do the opposite of your search.
That is having “ever” and finding “forever”, “whatever” and so on.

For your search I dont see an easier way, though I think there is one,
as always with ruby …:slight_smile:
You shoul try to fill your array like this though:

@array += found, this will add the entries of found to your existing
@array.
@array << found, will create an array of arrays, I am not sure if
that’s what you want…

good luck! smn

On Jun 21, 11:59 am, “bala kishore pulicherla” [email protected]

bala’s suggestion is correct if you’d do the opposite of your search.
That is having “ever” and finding “whatever”, “forever” and so on.

For your kind of search I dont see an easier way right now (but I am
sure there is, in ruby there’s always an easier way for these
things…:slight_smile:
Nevertheless you should try to merge the arrays with

@array += found”, that will add entries to the existing @array

@array << found” will create an array of array’s since General.find
returns an array, I’m not sure if that’s what you want…

good luck! smn