Using C++ Member Function with rb_protect

I’m having problems using a C++ member function with rb_protect. Here
is the code:

class Sandbox {
public:
Sandbox() {
sandbox_ = rb_funcall(rb_const_get(rb_cObject, rb_intern
(“Sandbox”)),
rb_intern(“safe”),
0);
}
virtual ~Sandbox() {
}
VALUE eval(char * code) {
int status = 0;
VALUE val = rb_protect(&Sandbox::eval_protect,
rb_str_new2(code),
&status);
if (status) { /* handle error… */ }
return val;
}
private:
VALUE eval_protect(VALUE code) {
return rb_funcall(sandbox_, rb_intern(“eval”), 1, code);
}
VALUE sandbox_;
};

The compile fails with:

test.cpp: In member function ?VALUE Sandbox::eval(char*)?:
test.cpp:18: error: cannot convert ?VALUE (Sandbox::)(VALUE)? to
?VALUE (
)(VALUE)? for argument ?1? to ?VALUE rb_protect(VALUE ()
(VALUE), VALUE, int
)?

$ ruby1.8 -v
ruby 1.8.5 (2006-08-06) [powerpc-darwin8.7.0]
$ g++ --version
powerpc-apple-darwin8-g+±4.0.1 (GCC) 4.0.1 (Apple Computer, Inc.
build 5341)
Copyright © 2005 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions. There
is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
– Daniel

On 8/8/06, Daniel H. [email protected] wrote:

I’m having problems using a C++ member function with rb_protect. Here
is the code:

What happens if you remove the & in this line:

VALUE val = rb_protect(&Sandbox::eval_protect,

Is it possible to make Sandbox::eval_protect a static function? Because
as
an instance method, it’s prototype is not VALUE()(VALUE) but rather
something like VALUE(
)(Sandbox&, VALUE).

On Aug 8, 2006, at 4:45 PM, Francis C. wrote:

What happens if you remove the & in this line:

VALUE val = rb_protect(&Sandbox::eval_protect,

I get this compile error:

test.cpp: In member function ?VALUE Sandbox::eval(char*)?:
test.cpp:15: error: argument of type ?VALUE (Sandbox::)(VALUE)? does
not match ?VALUE (*)(VALUE)?

– Daniel

Any ideas?

Also, have you tried casting to a void * ?

Any ideas?

I’m not sure if it will help, but for my C++ extensions, I’ve had to
do this type of trickery:

typedef VALUE (ruby_method)(…);

when doing this:

rb_define_method(some_ruby_object, “initialize”, (ruby_method*)
&some_object_initialize, 0);

On Wed, Aug 09, 2006 at 05:57:53AM +0900, Daniel H. wrote:

not match e$B!Fe(BVALUE (*)(VALUE)e$B!Ge(B
Of course it won’t work that way, being a member function (it is given a
reference to this too…).

You’d have to do something like this (it’s been a while without writing
any
C++, so take this with a grain of salt):

class Sandbox {
public:
Sandbox() {
sandbox_ = rb_funcall(rb_const_get(rb_cObject,
rb_intern(“Sandbox”)),
rb_intern(“safe”),
0);
}
virtual ~Sandbox() {
}
VALUE eval(char * code) {
int status = 0;
VALUE args[2];
args[0] = (VALUE)this;
args[1] = rb_str_new2(code);
VALUE val = rb_protect(&call_eval_protect, (VALUE)args,
&status);
if (status) { /* handle error… */ }
return val;
}
private:
static VALUE call_eval_protect(VALUE args) {
Sandbox *me = ((Sanbox *)args)[0];
VALUE code = ((VALUE *)args)[1];
return rb_funcall(me->sandbox_, rb_intern(“eval”), 1, code);
}
VALUE sandbox_;
};

On Wed, 2006-08-09 at 06:03 +0900, Francis C. wrote:

Is it possible to make Sandbox::eval_protect a static function? Because as
an instance method, it’s prototype is not VALUE()(VALUE) but rather
something like VALUE(
)(Sandbox&, VALUE).

Specifically, VALUE (Sandbox::)(VALUE). Pointers to non-static methods
are actually a totally separate family of types to function pointers and
cannot be called without first using the .
or ->* operators to “bind”
them. This is similar to the difference between UnboundMethod and
Proc/Method in Ruby.

-mental

On Aug 8, 2006, at 5:34 PM, Mauricio F. wrote:

Of course it won’t work that way, being a member function (it is
given a
reference to this too…).

You’d have to do something like this (it’s been a while without
writing any
C++, so take this with a grain of salt):

Thanks, I ended up with something similar.

class Sandbox
{
public:
Sandbox() {
sandbox_ = rb_funcall(rb_const_get(rb_cObject, rb_intern
(“Sandbox”)),
rb_intern(“safe”),
0);
}
virtual ~Sandbox() { }
VALUE eval(char * code) {
int status = 0;
VALUE args[2];
args[0] = reinterpret_cast(this);
args[1] = rb_str_new2(code);
VALUE val = rb_protect(eval_protect,
reinterpret_cast(args),
&status);
if (status) { }
return val;
}

 VALUE & sandbox() {
     return sandbox_;
 }

private:
VALUE sandbox_;
static VALUE eval_protect(VALUE data) {
VALUE *args = reinterpret_cast<VALUE *>(data);
return rb_funcall(reinterpret_cast<Sandbox *>(args[0])-

sandbox(),
rb_intern(“eval”),
1,
args[1]);
}
};

– Daniel

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