Ubuntu Linux Editor / Prettiefier

Anyone aware of an editor I can use on Ubuntu that will do RoR syntax
text coloring and a code prettiefier I can use under Linux for RoR
code? Thanks R.Vince

On Mon, Apr 19, 2010 at 10:58 AM, RVince [email protected] wrote:

Anyone aware of an editor I can use on Ubuntu that will do RoR syntax
text coloring and a code prettiefier I can use under Linux for RoR
code? Thanks R.Vince

If you’re familiar with (or don’t mind learn) VIM, you can use it
with rails-vim plugin (and a few other). It can do pretty much
everything you need. (If you need a full list of the plugins I’m
using, just ping me)
I think you can use GEdit too, but I think it just does syntax
highlighting.

Hope it helps.


Leonardo M…
There’s no place like ~

Well, Vim is really good editor. I’m using it by myself with a big
pleasure.
But to work effectively on it you’ll need to practice couple monthes and
collect all the plugins and so on.
If you need a fast start - use NetBeans IDE for Ruby. I’ve used it for 2
years, before I fell in love with Vim.
http://netbeans.org/downloads/index.html

It’s a little bit slow, 'cause it’s in Java - but it’ll give you syntax
highlighting, live-time syntax error checking, it will show API for each
Rails method you type, NetBeans autocompletion is something you can’t
find
anywhere, even on Vim. Like when you write ModelName and hit
autocompletion

  • it will give you all your database fields as methods. And so on. A lot
    of
    RoR-related features.
    NetBeans is RoR-newbie best friend :slight_smile:

I don’t care about autocompletion and API parsing now, since I remember
pretty much of it by myself. And I found some free time, and Vim guru in
my
team, so I’ve decided to switch on Vim to write code like a spiderman )
But
when you’re starting - you care about what you need to write much more,
than
about how to write it fast

On 19 April 2010 14:58, RVince [email protected] wrote:

Anyone aware of an editor I can use on Ubuntu that will do RoR syntax
text coloring and a code prettiefier I can use under Linux for RoR
code? Thanks R.Vince

I like the editor jEdit which does syntax colouring and auto indent
(reasonably well). Windows and Linux.

Colin

On Mon, Apr 19, 2010 at 9:28 AM, Colin L. [email protected]
wrote:

I like the editor jEdit which does syntax colouring and auto indent
(reasonably well). Windows and Linux.

Actually, any platform with a JVM, so Mac too.

And a hearty +1, it’s an awesomely configurable general editor.


Hassan S. ------------------------ [email protected]
twitter: @hassan

vim + plugins:
color_sample_pack.vim
minibufexpl.vim
NERD_tree.vim
surround.vim
endwise.vim
NERD_commenter.vim
matchit.vim
NERD_snippets.vim
rails.vim

Thanks so much guys!

I uses gedit with gmate http://github.com/gmate/gmate, it works well
form
me. Gedit has a lot of plugins http://live.gnome.org/Gedit/Plugins,

RVince wrote:

Anyone aware of an editor I can use on Ubuntu that will do RoR syntax
text coloring and a code prettiefier I can use under Linux for RoR
code? Thanks R.Vince

I’m fond of KomodoEdit. It’s a very good editor and does nice syntax
coloring for Ruby and Haml.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

kwang do ur html.erb files automatically turn into rails highlighting?
I tried so many things, but it never automatically changes, I always
have to do it manuelly.

Interesting that no one hs yet mentioned emacs. I decided the other
day to give it a go since so many posters had raved about it and
Netbeans sluggishness was frustrating me.

Well I have to say it has been hard work getting into emacs. I can
just about use the editor, and after a fair bit of fiddling, googling
and reading, I have rinari installed from ELPA and also emacs-rails.

Got the speedbar working for rails files - necessary for my transition
since I am finding grasping all the keyboard command sequences very
hard.

The biggest hurdle seems to be finding out exactly what can do with
it. Syntax highlighting is great and being able to directly open
views from being in a controller action etc is great, but all the
other stuff seems a million miles away.

Although I am finding it difficult I intend to persevere, the thing I
feel that is slowing me down at the moment is switching between
buffers when working with multiple source files.

I have never done much with auto completion or snippets even with
Netbeans, but suspect that there is performance gain just waiting to
be harvested. I am envious when I watch Ryan B. editing code he
zips around so elegantly (I know that is Textmate but emacs is
supposed to come close to it)

There are some screencasts around for emacs and rails, but they have
no sound and the casters seem to forget that they are dealing with
novices and screens flash around with invsible keystrokes in a way
that makes my head hurt. Nevertheless they do give an overview of
what is possible.

I havn’t yet found a quick way to duplicate a line or series of lines
eg alt+ctl+down arrow in netbeans - if anyone can enlighen me I would
be grateful.

Tonypm

I support VIM / GVIM all the way

Thanks & Regards,
Dhruva S…

tonypm wrote:

Interesting that no one hs yet mentioned emacs.

Ah, good point. Emacs is my favorite console editor, but I’m not all
that crazy about the graphical versions I’ve tried.

I decided the other
day to give it a go since so many posters had raved about it and
Netbeans sluggishness was frustrating me.

NetBeans is an excellent IDE, but it’s overkill for Rails. (I’d be
curious to know about it’s sluggishness, though – it has consistently
been pretty fast for me on Snow Leopard.)

[…]

Got the speedbar working for rails files - necessary for my transition
since I am finding grasping all the keyboard command sequences very
hard.

Then I’d almost say you shouldn’t use Emacs. You definitely have to be
comfortable with keyboard commands to get the most out of it.

The biggest hurdle seems to be finding out exactly what can do with
it.

Often, yes.

Syntax highlighting is great

Any better than in other editors?

and being able to directly open
views from being in a controller action etc is great,

This is one thing I miss in Komodo. Aptana has this.

but all the
other stuff seems a million miles away.

Although I am finding it difficult I intend to persevere, the thing I
feel that is slowing me down at the moment is switching between
buffers when working with multiple source files.

You might want to investigate a GUI version of Emacs, then. I don’t
like the ones I’ve tried, but you might.

I have never done much with auto completion or snippets even with
Netbeans, but suspect that there is performance gain just waiting to
be harvested. I am envious when I watch Ryan B. editing code he
zips around so elegantly (I know that is Textmate but emacs is
supposed to come close to it)

IMHO, so does KomodoEdit. Actually, Emacs “coming close to [TextMate]”
is a funny statement: Emacs is probably the more powerful of the two.

There are some screencasts around for emacs and rails, but they have
no sound and the casters seem to forget that they are dealing with
novices and screens flash around with invsible keystrokes in a way
that makes my head hurt. Nevertheless they do give an overview of
what is possible.

I havn’t yet found a quick way to duplicate a line or series of lines
eg alt+ctl+down arrow in netbeans - if anyone can enlighen me I would
be grateful.

C-k, C-y, C-y. There may be a faster way. If you don’t know this, you
really need to spend time on Emacs basics.

Tonypm

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 1:50 AM, tonypm [email protected] wrote:

I havn’t yet found a quick way to duplicate a line or series of lines
eg alt+ctl+down arrow in netbeans - if anyone can enlighen me I would
be grateful.

  1. Move the cursor to the start of the text you want to select.
  2. Set a starting mark using Ctrl + Space.
  3. Move the cursor to the end of the text you want to select.
  4. Copy the text using Alt + w, or cut the text using Ctrl + w.
  5. Move the cursor to wherever.
  6. Ctrl + y to paste.

Welcome to Emacs. I couldn’t imagine using something else at this
point.


Greg D.
destiney.com | gregdonald.com

On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 7:17 AM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

Ah, good point. Emacs is my favorite console editor, but I’m not all
that crazy about the graphical versions I’ve tried.

But it’s just so beautiful!

http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg

:slight_smile:


Greg D.
destiney.com | gregdonald.com

On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 1:50 AM, tonypm [email protected] wrote:

the thing I
feel that is slowing me down at the moment is switching between
buffers when working with multiple source files.

I switch buffers using the arrow keys most of the time.

Ctrl + x, and then left or right arrow.


Greg D.
destiney.com | gregdonald.com

On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 9:42 AM, Vladimir R.
[email protected] wrote:

The guy mean he could do it in NetBeans with one single move.
Select text and Ctrl+Alt+Down, Down, Down for three copies.

That doesn’t look like a “single move” to me. shrug


Greg D.
destiney.com | gregdonald.com

The guy mean he could do it in NetBeans with one single move.
Select text and Ctrl+Alt+Down, Down, Down for three copies.

That’s useful. But my favorite Netbeans feature about blocks was not
copying, but moving blocks around by
Alt+Shift+Up/Down/Left/Right. I don’t remember default mapping. I was
doing
it like that.
Not by Ctrl-x tap tap tap Ctrl+v or V tap tap tap x tap tap P. It will
save
a couple seconds each minute.
I was able to restore it on Vim. Moving blocks around with Ctrl+h,j,k,l
http://github.com/vrybas/dotvim/blob/master/rc.vim#L201

Another cool feature of Netbeans is Navigator window. When you see all
the
methods in current file and can immediately move to the method by
clicking
it’s name. Got something like that on Vim by searching for /def /
pattern,
display results on other window, and go to the method by entering line
number
http://github.com/vrybas/dotvim/blob/master/rc.vim#L298

That’s not standard stuff for all editors. And I pretty much can’t live
without it.
Let’s have a little holy battle here :slight_smile: Do you guys have your favorite
features unreachable or hardly unreachable from other editors?

gedit + plugins works for me :smiley: works like textmate, it has snippets
that you could modify, auto indention, auto bracket completion and
even an embedded terminal. plus the directory on the sidepane. syntax
highlighting works on ruby, html, and css.

I switch buffers using the arrow keys most of the time.

Ctrl + x, and then left or right arrow.

Thanks that helps (I notice you can also left and right click on the
buffer name in the status bar)

Tonypm