Trying to start with Ruby, and Rails, seperately

Hi,

I’m looking to start learning Ruby, and Rails, but one at a time. I am
seeking opinions on how I should start… what resources I should be
using, what programs, what the best set up for learning is… and then
how I should proceed. Any help is greatly apprecaited.

Thanks!

-e

I should mention, as well, that I am familiar with C/C++, HTML/CSS,
Perl, a fair amount of javascript, and the basics of SQL (mySQL).

On 2007-06-16 22:45:11 -0400, ed [email protected] said:

You should be able to fly through this:

http://pine.fm/LearnToProgram/

Then go to the PickAxe (google it and you will find it)

My father-in-law turned me on to programming and there is a book he
recommended called:

Beginning Ruby on Rails: E-Commerce…

that tells you exactly how to build an Amazon style site in minutes…

I’m still learning so wait for my response to be vetted by the
veterans…

I should mention, as well, that I am familiar with C/C++, HTML/CSS,
Perl, a fair amount of javascript, and the basics of SQL (mySQL).

I’d start with “The Ruby Way” by Hal F. - pretty much the only
book out there about how to write idiomatic Ruby - and the Pickaxe
(“Programming Ruby” from the Pragmatic Programmers). Then grab “Agile
Web Dev w/Rails,” also by the Pragmatics. Also, for a beginner’s book,
there’s “Ruby On Rails Power!” and Sitepoint’s Rails book, both of
which are good.


Giles B.

Blog: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio: http://www.gilesgoatboy.org

On 6/17/07, ed [email protected] wrote:

Hi,

I’m looking to start learning Ruby, and Rails, but one at a time. I am
seeking opinions on how I should start… what resources I should be
using, what programs, what the best set up for learning is… and then
how I should proceed. Any help is greatly apprecaited.

Thanks!

I think you should start with Ruby. It’s very simple, just read the
manual, try to make some code of your own and when you think you know
the basics jump to Rails.

If you go directly to Rails probably you still can make things work,
but you’ll not know what’s really happening.

Good Luck.

On 6/24/07, barjunk [email protected] wrote:

I’m really surprised “Ruby for Rails” wasn’t mentioned in all of the
titles. I think it fits the OP’s needs closest, aside from Pickaxe.
I haven’t read Hal’s book, but trust Giles recommendation.

Hal’s book is excellent but is not for beginners. (It says so right
in the beginning)
I do think it’d be a great book to have around once you go beyond the
basics, but it’s not meant to teach you Ruby.

On Jun 23, 7:31 pm, “Giles B.” [email protected] wrote:


Giles B.

Blog:http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio:http://www.gilesgoatboy.org

I’m really surprised “Ruby for Rails” wasn’t mentioned in all of the
titles. I think it fits the OP’s needs closest, aside from Pickaxe.
I haven’t read Hal’s book, but trust Giles recommendation.

Mike B.

On 6/24/07, Giles B. [email protected] wrote:

Hal’s book is excellent but is not for beginners. (It says so right
in the beginning)
I do think it’d be a great book to have around once you go beyond the
basics, but it’s not meant to teach you Ruby.

True!

The OP mentioned working with Perl and C++, so I figured I’d risk it.
It isn’t for the totally uninitiated, though.

I should have read upwards. I think I saw the first post but not the
second. Yeah, I think with that background it might be doable, as
long as (like you suggested) you had the Pickaxe for reference.

barjunk wrote:


Mike B.
Yeah … I’ll second this nomination. Someone coming from
C++/HTML/Perl/MySQL shouldn’t need anything else to get started. If
you’re going to do it professionally, you’ll absolutely need both the
Pickaxe and Agile Web D. With Rails, Second Edition, as
references, though. I don’t see how you can live without all three. Then
again, I don’t see how you can live without “The Ruby Way, Second
Edition”, either.

The OP is clearly not a beginner at either programming, object-oriented
programming or web application development. I wouldn’t recommend
cookbooks or beginners’ books given that.

Hal’s book is excellent but is not for beginners. (It says so right
in the beginning)
I do think it’d be a great book to have around once you go beyond the
basics, but it’s not meant to teach you Ruby.

True!

The OP mentioned working with Perl and C++, so I figured I’d risk it.
It isn’t for the totally uninitiated, though.

I’m really surprised “Ruby for Rails” wasn’t mentioned in all of the
titles. I think it fits the OP’s needs closest, aside from Pickaxe.

Well, he said he wanted to learn Ruby and Rails, but one at a time. It
is a great book, though.

If you got “Ruby Way” and “R4R,” and you already had skill in
programming of some similar kind, you’d probably be well on your way
to writing very idiomatic Ruby.


Giles B.

Blog: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio: http://www.gilesgoatboy.org

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