Trying to get "translator" to work

So, basically, I’m trying to get the below code to work properly for
“piglatin”. I have gotten it to work with mulitple words, if the word
starts with a vowel, if the word starts with a consonant, and if the
word starts with two consonants. This was a hell of a lot of trial and
error getting to this point.

However, I am stuck and need a little help getting unstuck. One thing
about “piglatin” is that I need to turn words like “quale” into
“alequay”. Also I need to have words like “square” to turn into
“aresquay”. AKA, if qu shows up somewhere, I need those letters (and
any that proceed it) to shift to the back and ad an +ay to the end.

The current code turns “quale” into “ualeqay” instead.

I have thought about this and really am unclear how to proceed about it.
The below code is the code I was talking about and made myself. I
realize some things could probably be “cleaner” about it, but I’m just
starting to learn so it will do for now.

Anyhow, I would love to somehow get unstuck with this.

def translate(words)
z=""
vowels=%w(a e i o u)
consonants=%w(b c d f g h j k l m n p q r s t v w x y z)
words.gsub(/\w+/) do |word|
#the word in a array
z=word.scan(/\w/)
#checks to see if first letter has a vowel
contains_vowels=vowels & z.first.split(",")
two_consonants=z[0…1] & consonants
three_consonants = z[0…2] & consonants

if(contains_vowels.size>=1)
      z.join("")+"ay"
elsif(three_consonants.size==3)
      x=z.shift(3)
       z.join("")<<x.join("")+"ay"
elsif(two_consonants.size==2)
       x=z.shift(2)
      z.join("")<<x.join("")+"ay"
else
      x=z.shift
      z<<x+"ay"
      z.join("")
end

end
end

I’ll have to have a think about the “qu” problem (one of the geniuses
will probably beat me to it), but check this Regex out for extracting
consonants: /a-z&&[^aeiou]]/i
Try it on www.rubular.com :slight_smile:

On a side note, I tried the /a-z&&[^aeiou]]/i in rubular.com. It
basically said, “Forward slashes must be escaped”. I’m not sure it
works. I’m not familiar with using that website though. I always just
use IRB to test things.

On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 8:51 PM, JD KF [email protected] wrote:

any that proceed it) to shift to the back and ad an +ay to the end.
word = “square”
=> “square”
first, second = word.match(/(.qu)(.)/).captures
=> [“squ”, “are”]
“#{second}#{first}ay”
=> “aresquay”

Jesus.

“Jesús Gabriel y Galán” [email protected] wrote in post
#1088119:

On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 8:51 PM, JD KF [email protected] wrote:

any that proceed it) to shift to the back and ad an +ay to the end.
word = “square”
=> “square”
first, second = word.match(/(.qu)(.)/).captures
=> [“squ”, “are”]
“#{second}#{first}ay”
=> “aresquay”

Jesus.

Way better than the shameful hack I ended up trying (writing another
method to pass all the results through) :slight_smile:

JD KF wrote in post #1088118:

On a side note, I tried the /a-z&&[^aeiou]]/i in rubular.com. It
basically said, “Forward slashes must be escaped”. I’m not sure it
works. I’m not familiar with using that website though. I always just
use IRB to test things.

Here’s a demo I made for you: http://www.rubular.com/r/7sZKl7CqJ1

The “i” after the last forward slash makes it case-insensitive. The same
as adding (?i) at the beginning.

On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 11:16 PM, JD KF [email protected] wrote:

Maybe I am just bad at this, but I’m having a hard time figuring out how
to implement what Jesus is saying into my if statements or code.

Maybe I’m just bad at this (well, I sort of am, but I am trying to
learn). Could someone maybe give me a nudge as to how to implement it
into my code?

You don’t have to give me the full answer, but some help would be great
:/.

I’m guessing the argument words is just a string, since you are
gsubbing it, so let’s call it sentence.
What I’d do is split it first, then process each word separately,
applying the piglatin rules:

words = sentence.split(/\W/) # or some other variation
words.map! do |word|

apply piglatin rules to word

end

Jesus.

I have looked at what you are saying. I’m having a hard time seeing how
to work it into what I currently have. But I am trying to implement
what you are saying.

This is what I was thinking of doing.

Before the if, elsif statements, I put:

contains_qu=word.match(/(.qu)(.)/).captures
qu_length=contains_que.length

Then I have in the if conditions:

elsif(qu_length>=2)

Code to swap things around
end

Problem is, the .captures will not work if the “word” does not have
something containing qu. It throws an error. Anyone know a way around
that?

Maybe I am just bad at this, but I’m having a hard time figuring out how
to implement what Jesus is saying into my if statements or code.

Maybe I’m just bad at this (well, I sort of am, but I am trying to
learn). Could someone maybe give me a nudge as to how to implement it
into my code?

You don’t have to give me the full answer, but some help would be great
:/.

contains_qu=word.match(/(.qu)(.)/).captures rescue contains_qu=nil

I got lost trying to decode your logic for two consonants, three
consonants etc, so here is a simple implementation of the rules from
Wikipedia instead.

def translate(words)
words.gsub(/\w+/) do |word|
case word
# In words that begin with consonant sounds, the initial consonant
or
# consonant cluster is moved to the end of the word, and “ay” is
added.
# Note that “qu” is treated as a consonant sound.
when /^((b|c|d|f|g|h|j|k|l|m|n|p|qu|r|s|t|v|w|x|y|z)+)(.)/i
“#{$3}#{$1}ay”
# In words that begin with vowel sounds or silent consonants, the
initial
# vowel is removed and the syllable “way” added to the end of the
word
# FIXME: silent consonants are not considered here.
when /^[aeiou]+(.
)/i
“#{$1}way”
else
word
end
end
end

puts translate(“pig computer happy question another about quale square”)

You may find the above rather terse for your liking, but it boils down
to “if the word matches this pattern, then rebuild it using the captured
parts like this”. It’s an example of the power and brevity of ruby :slight_smile:

On Fri, Dec 7, 2012 at 4:51 AM, JD KF [email protected] wrote:

So, basically, I’m trying to get the below code to work properly for
“piglatin”. I have gotten it to work with mulitple words, if the word
starts with a vowel, if the word starts with a consonant, and if the
word starts with two consonants. This was a hell of a lot of trial and
error getting to this point.

This is not a complete solution, but maybe you can modify the ‘if’
statement to make the rules.
I am a bit rusty with pig latin.

def pig(w)
arr = []
(1…w.size).each do |a|
if w[0…a] !~ /[aeiou]/ or (w[0…(a-1)] !~ /[aeiou]/ and
w[0…a] =~ /qu\z/)
arr << w[a…-1]+w[0…a]+“ay”
end
end
arr << w + “way” if w[0…0] =~ /[aeiou]/
arr[-1]
end

words = [ “square”, “quiet”, “bird”,
“apple”,“require”,“start”,“strength”]

words.each{|f| p pig(f)}

OUTPUT

“aresquay”
“ietquay”
“irdbay”
“appleway”
“equireray”
“artstay”
“engthstray”

Harry

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