Time.yesterday :)


#1

Hello group.

Is there any simple method to get Time object like Time.now but with
yesterday date, without worrying about end of month or begining new one
?


#2

On Thursday 17 November 2005 8:57 am, Marcin J. wrote:

Hello group.

Is there any simple method to get Time object like Time.now but with
yesterday date, without worrying about end of month or begining new one ?

Time.now - 86400

Kirk H.


#3

Kirk H. wrote:

On Thursday 17 November 2005 8:57 am, Marcin J. wrote:

Hello group.

Is there any simple method to get Time object like Time.now but with
yesterday date, without worrying about end of month or begining new one ?

Time.now - 86400

Kirk H.
:stuck_out_tongue:
I knew that is something simple - but not so simple :slight_smile:

Tha


#4

greg@oracle ~ $ irb
irb(main):001:0> Time.now
=> Thu Nov 17 11:38:02 EST 2005
irb(main):002:0> class Time
irb(main):003:1> def self.yesterday
irb(main):004:2> now - 86400
irb(main):005:2> end
irb(main):006:1> end
=> nil
irb(main):007:0> Time.yesterday
=> Wed Nov 16 11:38:27 EST 2005


#5

class Time
def Time.yesterday
t=Time.now
Time.at(t.to_i-86400)
end
end

p Time.yesterday

I knew that is something simple - but not so simple :slight_smile:

Tha

proste :smiley:

lopex


#6

even shorter:

def Time.yesterday; now - 86400; end


#7

You don’t need the intermediate variable

class Time
def self.yesterday
now - 86400
end
end

Time.yesterday works just fine :slight_smile:


#8

Peter E. wrote:

def Time.yesterday; now - 86400; end

Haha very nice.


#9

Marcin MielżyÅ?ski napisaÅ?(a):

Tha

proste :smiley:

lopex
like a stick :slight_smile:


#10

It’s in Active Support:

http://as.rubyonrails.com/


#11

On Nov 17, 2005, at 10:57 AM, Gene T. wrote:

It’s in Active Support:

http://as.rubyonrails.com/

No, Time.yesterday is not in active_support, Time#yesterday is.

Also, active_support emits far, far, far too many warnings. I could
maybe deal with 1 or two warnings, but not 169:

$ cat yesterday.rb
#!/usr/local/bin/ruby -w

require ‘rubygems’
require ‘active_support’

p Time.yesterday

$ ruby yesterday.rb
/usr/local/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/activesupport-1.2.3/lib/
active_support/class_inheritable_attributes.rb:116: warning:
discarding old inherited
/usr/local/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/activesupport-1.2.3/lib/
active_support/inflections.rb:2: warning: ambiguous first argument;
put parentheses or even spaces
[snip 167 lines of warnings]
yesterday.rb:6: undefined method `yesterday’ for Time:Class
(NoMethodError)


#12

On Nov 17, 2005, at 2:13 PM, Eric H. wrote:

No, Time.yesterday is not in active_support, Time#yesterday is.

Also, active_support emits far, far, far too many warnings. I
could maybe deal with 1 or two warnings, but not 169:

Ditto. Whenever I see that sort of thing, I start to wonder
what I’m getting myself into.

Gary W.


#13

Marcin J. removed_email_address@domain.invalid writes:

Hello group.

Is there any simple method to get Time object like Time.now but with
yesterday date, without worrying about end of month or begining new one ?

Pedantic to be sure, but keep in mind all the variations on the
“… - 86400” scheme universally fail during the Daylight Savings
Time cutovers that some of us are unfortunate to have to suffer.

Probably this won’t affect you.


#14

In article removed_email_address@domain.invalid,
Michael C. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Probably this won’t affect you.

Even more pedantic: even if it does not, the assumption that every day
has 86400 seconds is still incorrect. A day with a leap second has 86401
or 86399 (has not happened yet) seconds.

Reinder


#15

Well… if a time wasn’t essential, and a Date could be used instead:
require ‘date’
Date.today - 1

By the way, for anyone playing with date/time functions, date also will
increment/decrement months:
Date.today >> 1 # Adds a month
Date.today << 1 # Subtracts a month

Might be handy,
.adam


#16

Reinder V. removed_email_address@domain.invalid writes:

Pedantic to be sure, but keep in mind all the variations on the
“… - 86400” scheme universally fail during the Daylight Savings
Time cutovers that some of us are unfortunate to have to suffer.

Probably this won’t affect you.

Even more pedantic: even if it does not, the assumption that every
day has 86400 seconds is still incorrect. A day with a leap second
has 86401 or 86399 (has not happened yet) seconds.

Chuckle I completely forgot about that too; good catch. =)