Textmate Like Editor for Windows

I was hoping this day would never come… :frowning:

I am working on a Rails based app and unfortunately the company I am
doing a contract for wants me to use their machine. Does anyone have
any suggestions for a text editor? Textmate rocks for me on mac…
anything like that on PC?

While I am at it… anything to replace YourSQL as a GUI front-end for
mysql on PC? :slight_smile:

Thanks everyone :-).


John K.
[email protected]

http://www.kopanas.com
http://www.cusec.net
http://www.soen.info

Does anyone have
any suggestions for a text editor? Textmate rocks for me on mac…
anything like that on PC?

I use RadRails which is pretty darn good…

http://www.radrails.org/

While I am at it… anything to replace YourSQL as a GUI front-end for
mysql on PC? :slight_smile:

How about HeidiSQL?

http://www.heidisql.com/

I used to believe for my needs, text editors were pretty much the same,
and was never very picky about what I used. Then I used TextMate. Now I
purposefully avoid coding in Windows…

That being said, I was always a fan of jEdit. It’s cross platform, easy
to set up, and extremely customizable. You can use the SuperAbrevs
plugin to set up TextMate like snippets, and it has nice pseudo-IDE
features, too. It is Java based, so it can be a bit slow at times.

On Wed, Nov 08, 2006 at 03:30:41PM -0500, John K. wrote:
}
} I was hoping this day would never come… :frowning:
}
} I am working on a Rails based app and unfortunately the company I am
} doing a contract for wants me to use their machine. Does anyone have
} any suggestions for a text editor? Textmate rocks for me on mac…
} anything like that on PC?
}
} While I am at it… anything to replace YourSQL as a GUI front-end for
} mysql on PC? :slight_smile:
}
} Thanks everyone :-).

I will apologize now for my rant, but rant I shall:

As a developer, it simply isn’t reasonable to expect to be working on
the
same operating system from project to project and job to job. At the
same
time, it is desirable and appropriate to invest time in becoming
proficient
with one’s tools. In tools I include all the things one uses day-to-day,
with one’s editor at the top of the list. Other tools include an IM
client
(yes, it’s a development tool when some coworkers are off-site), an IRC
client (Freenode is a great place for technical help, which contributes
to
one’s development work), web browser customization (e.g. Firebug,
EditCSS,
and the Web D. toolbar, at a minimum), and a commandline shell.

I use vim as my editor, and I have some 400k of configuration I copy to
any
new account. I use gaim for IM, and copy its config as well. Xchat for
IRC.
Firefox and a long list of extensions (maintained in an RDF file
suitable
for use as a live bookmark) for my web browser. My preferred shell is
tcsh.

What do all of these have in common? They are all both Free and free
(actually, xchat on Windows is shareware if you don’t want to dig around
and compile it yourself, but it’s cheap), and available on every major
OS (and most minor ones as well). My tools don’t have to change when my
project or job does. (The exception is Visual Studio when doing .NET or
whatnot, but that’s unavoidable.)

The point of this rant is that however good Textmate may seem, the cost
of
it being available on only a single platform is too high. The same
applies
to UltraEdit, BBEdit, and others. It also applies to YourSQL; whatever
RDBMS I am using has a text console or something strongly resembling
one,
and that will do fine (and it means I just need to know SQL, not another
tool). So wean yourself from Textmate and pick something that’s
available
everywhere. Pick vim, pick emacs, pick nano if it makes you happy.

} John K.
–Greg

On Nov 8, 2006, at 3:04 PM, Gregory S. wrote:

available
everywhere. Pick vim, pick emacs, pick nano if it makes you happy.

I know you don’t mean this, but it seems as though you’re advocating
lowest-common-denominator, for the purpose of widespread availability.

Perhaps we should all edit code in a ! :slight_smile:


– Tom M., CTO
– Engine Y., Ruby on Rails Hosting
– Reliability, Ease of Use, Scalability
– (866) 518-YARD (9273)

And Dr. Nic just posted all the TextMate snippets as importable into
RadRails/Eclipse:
http://drnicwilliams.com/2006/11/06/post-halloween-radrails-trick-all-textmate-snippets-available/

That should help you a bit.

–dwf

On Nov 8, 1:30 pm, Luke P. [email protected]

Gregory S. wrote:

My tools don’t have to change when my
project or job does. (The exception is Visual Studio when doing .NET or
whatnot, but that’s unavoidable.)

Have you tried our Visual Studio Ruby IDE, ‘Ruby In Steel’? There’s a
free Personal Edition available now and a more powerful commercial
version, the Developer Edition, scheduled for release in January.

best wishes
Huw

http://www.sapphiresteel.com
Ruby P.ming For Visual Studio 2005

As a developer, it simply isn’t reasonable to expect to be working on the
same operating system from project to project and job to job.

It very much is. You may be working for different operating system, but
this not necessarily denies you the ability to work on your preffered
operating system.
Especially if we are talking about Rails.

<…>

The point of this rant is that however good Textmate may seem, the cost of
it being available on only a single platform is too high.
<…>

Cost of jumping from platform to platform is too high, not the cost of
Textmate.

The same applies
to UltraEdit, BBEdit, and others. It also applies to YourSQL; whatever
RDBMS I am using has a text console or something strongly resembling one,
and that will do fine (and it means I just need to know SQL, not another
tool). So wean yourself from Textmate and pick something that’s available
everywhere. Pick vim, pick emacs, pick nano if it makes you happy.

Pick anything that makes you most happy/productive. That includes
Textmate,
YourSQL, whatever.

What I do not understand is why do they want you to use their machine
anyway?

Regards,
Rimantas

http://rimantas.com/

On Wed, Nov 08, 2006 at 03:14:04PM -0800, Tom M. wrote:
}
} On Nov 8, 2006, at 3:04 PM, Gregory S. wrote:
}
} > The point of this rant is that however good Textmate may seem, the
} > cost of it being available on only a single platform is too high.
The
} > same applies to UltraEdit, BBEdit, and others. It also applies to
} > YourSQL; whatever RDBMS I am using has a text console or something
} > strongly resembling one, and that will do fine (and it means I just
} > need to know SQL, not another tool). So wean yourself from Textmate
} > and pick something that’s available everywhere. Pick vim, pick
emacs,
} > pick nano if it makes you happy.
}
} I know you don’t mean this, but it seems as though you’re advocating
} lowest-common-denominator, for the purpose of widespread availability.

I certainly do not consider Vim to be the lowest common denominator, nor
do
I consider Emacs to be. (You might consider nano to be, but I’ve known
people who swear by it.) They are both very powerful and customizable
editors that are excellent for developing code.

When it comes to specific features, there is only one Textmate has
that Vim doesn’t: the fuzzy filename matching for opening files. I have
hopes that someone will get around to implementing it for Vim, but it
isn’t
enough of an advantage to abandon 15 years of time and effort invested
in
learning the editor, much less giving up OS independence. I’ll point out
that I could not have invested those 15 years in any less OS-independent
editor.

} Perhaps we should all edit code in a ! :slight_smile:

That’s what MozEx is for. It’s a great Firefox plugin that allows
editing
textareas in an external editor… and works nicely with the editor of
your
choice on every OS on which Firefox runs.

} – Tom M., CTO
–Greg

On Thu, Nov 09, 2006 at 01:21:44AM +0200, Rimantas L. wrote:
} > As a developer, it simply isn’t reasonable to expect to be working
on the
} > same operating system from project to project and job to job.
}
} It very much is. You may be working for different operating system,
but
} this not necessarily denies you the ability to work on your preffered
} operating system. Especially if we are talking about Rails.

In my career I’ve learned and worked with numerous languages, APIs,
frameworks, and platforms. I’m nowhere near halfway through my career,
so I
expect to learn and work with even more in the future. Ruby and Rails
are
ascendant, but will they remain on top for the rest of my career?
Doubtful.
*nix, MacOS X, and Windows are all used for software development
and deployment platforms. Will they always? Will something else come
along?
If so, I bet Vim will be ported to it, and I bet I’ll wind up working on
it
at some point.

} <…>
} > The point of this rant is that however good Textmate may seem, the
cost of
} > it being available on only a single platform is too high.
} <…>
}
} Cost of jumping from platform to platform is too high, not the cost of
} Textmate.

Nope. Agility is more than just a development process. I will not turn
up
my nose at work on a platform I don’t care for. I’m delighted to be
employed developing with Ruby on Rails, but I spent nearly a year
at my previous job developing with VB.NET, which is much less fun. It
paid
the mortgage, however, and improved my marketability. Oh, yeah, and I
used
all the same tools the whole time.

} > The same applies to UltraEdit, BBEdit, and others. It also applies
to
} > YourSQL; whatever RDBMS I am using has a text console or something
} > strongly resembling one, and that will do fine (and it means I just
} > need to know SQL, not another tool). So wean yourself from Textmate
and
} > pick something that’s available everywhere. Pick vim, pick emacs,
pick
} > nano if it makes you happy.
}
} Pick anything that makes you most happy/productive. That includes
} Textmate, YourSQL, whatever.

I agree, but I consider the long term rather than the short term. Assume
for the moment that I’d be some measurable amount more productive using
Textmate. That would last until I moved to another job, which is
unlikely
to be Mac-based, statistically, even if it’s a Rails job. At that point
I’d
be starting over with other tools.

What makes me most productive, in the long run, is to use powerful tools
that will outlast any changes in job, project, or platform. I can invest
time and effort in learning them and customizing them, secure in the
knowledge that that investment will pay dividend for many years to come.
It
would take a pretty amazing new tool to make me as productive as I am
with
my current tools even with six months of invested time and effort in the
new tool. I’ve been able to benefit from 15 years of investment in Vim
(and
vi before it) because I could be confident that Vim would always be
available to me no matter what development work I was doing.

Before you claim that OS independence isn’t important, see what benefit
you
get from a decade or more invested in a powerful tool.

} What I do not understand is why do they want you to use their machine
} anyway?

Most companies require you to work on their machines, if only to
eliminate
the ambiguity of what you own and what they own. Small, independent
contractors can get away with working on their own equipment sometimes,
but
most developers are not independent contractors and do not care to be.

} Regards,
} Rimantas
–Greg

John K. wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a text editor?

The Zeus for Windows IDE has support for Ruby:

http://www.zeusedit.com/features.html

It does Ruby syntax highlighting, code folding and class
browsing. It also has features like macro scripting,
intergrated version control, smart indenting, project
workspace management etc etc.

Jussi Jumppanen
Author: Zeus for Windows

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