Streaming Spreadsheet in Ruby

(This posting can be ignored unless you live-or-die by a *nix command
line.)

    http://rubyforge.org/projects/sss/

On the other hand, have you ever wanted to do some quick math on a CSV
without waiting to launch Excel or Gnumeric? (Or you’re logged in
remotely.) Maybe you’d like to print the average timestamp across all
lines in a log file? Or you might wish “cut” split columns with a
regexp, not just a delimiter?

I just GPL’ed a project of mine for doing spreadsheet style
calculations on the command line. It’s probably easiest to explain with
an example. Say you have a sample file called “data.csv”, which looks
like this:

Year,Change,TOTAL
2001,34.5,100.1
2002,36.6,101.13
2003,-11,90.5
2004,0,95

And then you call the Streaming Spreadsheet like so:

$ cat data.csv | sss 'b=sum(b)' 'c=sd(c)' 'c1="full total"'

You’ll get this on standard out:

Year    Change  full total
2001    34.5    100.1
2002    36.6    101.13
2003    -11     90.5
2004    0       95
        60.1
                4.91642400531117

Note that “cell” C1 has been changed, and those last two lines added
with the sum of the B column, and the standard deviation of the C.
Since it’s really just a tarted up “eval,” more complicated stuff also
works:

$ cat data.csv |sss 'd=(123**2.3).to_i'

On standard out:

Year    Change  TOTAL
2001    34.5    100.1
2002    36.6    101.13
2003    -11     90.5
2004    0       95
                        64088

The script is a moderately-clever 350 lines of Ruby (IMHO). For
instance, it takes advantage of a quirk in parsing this sort of thing:

eval("b32:c35")

This string of code ends up trying to call a method named “b32” with
one argument, the symbol “:c35”. Perfect for returning a range of cells
via “def method_missing()”!

I hope it’s useful for someone else right now, but the project is very
much still in beta.

    http://rubyforge.org/projects/sss/

[email protected] writes:

You’ll get this on standard out:

Year    Change  full total
2001    34.5    100.1
2002    36.6    101.13
2003    -11     90.5
2004    0       95
        60.1
                4.91642400531117

Looks like a case for awk to me…

On Thu, 23 Nov 2006 [email protected] wrote:

2004 0 95
On standard out:

eval(“b32:c35”)

This string of code ends up trying to call a method named “b32” with
one argument, the symbol “:c35”. Perfect for returning a range of cells
via “def method_missing()”!

I hope it’s useful for someone else right now, but the project is very
much still in beta.

   http://rubyforge.org/projects/sss/

very cool! i’ve done similar things many times, i’ll give it a whirl
today!

-a

Do you really want to learn Awk’s esoterica, in 2006? It doesn’t do
aggregation well (SUM, MEAN), and “we know Ruby already.”

[email protected] wrote:

(This posting can be ignored unless you live-or-die by a *nix command
line.)

:slight_smile:

    http://rubyforge.org/projects/sss/

Neat. One of my first ruby programs was a port of a perl program of mine
that was sort of like this, but without builtin aggregation. The
eval(“b32:c35”) part is clever!

On 11/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

(This posting can be ignored unless you live-or-die by a *nix command
line.)

Ben, this is neat. You might get a lot of implementation details for
free by building this atop Ruport.

But the simplicity is pretty awesome. Cool stuff!

On Fri, Nov 24, 2006 at 04:05:38AM +0900, [email protected] wrote:
} Do you really want to learn Awk’s esoterica, in 2006? It doesn’t do
} aggregation well (SUM, MEAN), and “we know Ruby already.”
}
} David K. wrote:
[…]
} > Looks like a case for awk to me…
} >
} > –
} > David K., Kriemhildstr. 15, 44793 Bochum

I’ve known awk for much longer than Ruby had existed. It is excellent
for
line-based, field-based data manipulation. It feels a lot like C, with a
few other niceties (like associative arrays).

The point here is that you use the right tool for the job. For this job,
awk is decidedly the right job.

–Greg

Gregory S. wrote:

I used “awk” when it was the only “scripting language” available to me.
As soon as I got my hands on Perl, however, I relished at the thought of
getting rid of a mess composed of a bunch of “the right tools for the
right jobs” – ksh, awk, sed, cat, pipes, etc. That whole programming
style was a great one when it was new, and when there wasn’t anything
better. But once there was one tool – Perl – that did all the jobs
and looked like a real Algol-like programming language, had arrays and
hashes, there was no way I was going back.

And now that there’s Ruby, I don’t really even want to go back to Perl.


M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC§
http://borasky-research.blogspot.com/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.

Looks like a case for awk to me…

The point here is that you use the right tool for the job. For
this job, awk is decidedly the right job.

Ruby is beauty.
If you prefer awk, stick to it.
But if others want to use Ruby,
let them use Ruby.

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