Story testing views in isolation

Hi,

I’ve been investigating plain text stories, and I had a quick question.
How
would I go about creating story tests for views in isolation, instead of
the
full stack? I had hoped to be able to do a straight render ‘/’, but it
says
it can’t find the method.

The reason that I want to do this is that I want to give our
designer/business people a way to write stories to describe their user
interface while they work on the prototype, then give us the stories to
help
us integrate their prototypes more safely.

I realize that I could use examples for this, but I was hoping to use
stories.

-Corey

On Tue, Mar 11, 2008 at 2:53 AM, Corey H. [email protected]
wrote:

Hi,

I’ve been investigating plain text stories, and I had a quick question. How
would I go about creating story tests for views in isolation, instead of the
full stack? I had hoped to be able to do a straight render ‘/’, but it says
it can’t find the method.

We didn’t really think of views in isolation for stories.

The reason that I want to do this is that I want to give our
designer/business people a way to write stories to describe their user
interface while they work on the prototype, then give us the stories to help
us integrate their prototypes more safely.

So you’re hoping they’ll use the stories and get them to pass against
the views as they evolve?

I realize that I could use examples for this, but I was hoping to use
stories.

There’s really no support for this as it stands. Not sure if I’d want
that to change. Other opinions?

David

On Tue, Mar 11, 2008 at 6:16 AM, David C. [email protected]
wrote:

The reason that I want to do this is that I want to give our
designer/business people a way to write stories to describe their user
interface while they work on the prototype, then give us the stories to
help
us integrate their prototypes more safely.

So you’re hoping they’ll use the stories and get them to pass against
the views as they evolve?

Yeah. I’d like to have them use the stories against the mockups they
build,
then we move the stories to the live app as we integrate their changes.
These are just some initial thoughts I’ve had, so I’m always open to
alternate ideas.

One option I thought about was to use pages that don’t have any
functionality behind them (other than perhaps some basic navigation),
then
they could design their mockups against these. As we integrate their
designs
in, we can start adding functionality behind it. This seems more in line
with (perhaps one of) the original ideas for stories.

I realize that I could use examples for this, but I was hoping to use
stories.

There’s really no support for this as it stands. Not sure if I’d want
that to change. Other opinions?

Would it be as simple as supporting render/assigns, like in view specs?

In the end, our designer/business have programming skills, so I could
have
them use example groups; it isn’t like example groups are so incredibly
cryptic. When you format as specdoc, they provide a decent doumentation;
I
do like stories better, though. :slight_smile:

On Tue, Mar 11, 2008 at 8:03 AM, Corey H. [email protected]
wrote:

One option I thought about was to use pages that don’t have any

There’s really no support for this as it stands. Not sure if I’d want
that to change. Other opinions?

This feels like a square peg in a round hole type of situation. It
doesn’t seem like in practice this works very well:

Given a user <where?>
When they
Then they see <what?>

In isolation the Given/When/Then don’t make as much sense because you
can’t do anything, you don’t go anywhere and the Given/When/Then make
less sense in the context of isolation. It also seems to muddy the
definition of a story. All in all it just feels kind of funny.

+1 for keeping view specs act as view specs and stories act as stories.

Corey,

What part of the Story do you like that you want the designers to be
exposed to? A higher level API, the plain text part (separation from
implementation of the test), etc… ?

Zach

On Tue, Mar 11, 2008 at 2:39 PM, Zach D. [email protected]
wrote:

+1 for keeping view specs act as view specs and stories act as stories.

Agreed. AFAIK stories are for describing a series of actions and
behavior and that doesn’t really fit in nicely with specifying views
in isolation.

//jarkko


Jarkko L.
http://jlaine.net
http://odesign.fi

Thanks, everyone, for the thoughts. After thinking about it further and
reflecting on all the thoughts, I think it definitely is more of a
square
peg - round hole situation. Luckily, my designer is well able to handle
building view specs for the prototypes that he is building. We then are
going to use the specs to integrate the prototype views into our main
application.

Thanks.
-Corey

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