So, who's writing a dedicated ruby ide?

The recent thread on newbie-friendliness and a “ruby in a box” IDE
made me wonder what the dedicated ruby IDEs or text editors with IDE
features out there were (as opposed to ruby plugins for larger,
general-purpose IDEs and editors). So far, the active projects I’ve
seen are

Others?

martin

RubyMine from JetBrains

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On Wed, Apr 13, 2011 at 8:32 AM, Sebastian B. <
[email protected]> wrote:

I will have in released in the next week or so the beginnings of Try
Ruby
offline.
It isn’t geared towards professionals, but rather beginners.
The idea is to put a repl + embedded ruby 1.9.2 interpreter into a
simple to
run executable for windows mac and linux.

I’ll make an announcement about it when I can show the code and show
something that runs. :slight_smile:

Andrew McElroy
http://TryRuby.org

On Wed, Apr 13, 2011 at 10:29 AM, andrew mcelroy
[email protected]wrote:

features out there were (as opposed to ruby plugins for larger,

I’ll make an announcement about it when I can show the code and show
something that runs. :slight_smile:

Andrew McElroy
http://TryRuby.org

Looking forward to it :slight_smile:

On 2011-04-13, at 08:29, andrew mcelroy wrote:

I will have in released in the next week or so the beginnings of Try Ruby
offline.
It isn’t geared towards professionals, but rather beginners.
The idea is to put a repl + embedded ruby 1.9.2 interpreter into a simple to
run executable for windows mac and linux.
This is a very worthwhile project, and I think it will be extremely
useful.

I would hesitate to call it an IDE, though, as from your description it
doesn’t appear to include any kind of editor. Thus while it’s extremely
useful for experimenting with Ruby (hence the name), it’s not going to
be ideal for helping newbies learn to write programs in Ruby.

Is there any chance you might want to push this project a bit further
and include a basic editor?

– v

On Wed, Apr 13, 2011 at 8:59 PM, andrew mcelroy [email protected]
wrote:

I will have in released in the next week or so the beginnings of Try Ruby
offline.
It isn’t geared towards professionals, but rather beginners.
The idea is to put a repl + embedded ruby 1.9.2 interpreter into a simple to
run executable for windows mac and linux.

I’ll make an announcement about it when I can show the code and show
something that runs. :slight_smile:

exciting news :slight_smile: what ui toolkit are you basing it on?

martin

On 2011-04-13, at 20:10, Chad P. wrote, regarding my comments about
offline TryRuby and a text editor:

Include interactive_editor with a default editor on the system and it
suddenly has a text editor – without having to bundle the text editor
with the Ruby package. Even better, because the text editor is not tied
to the IDE except by way of interactive_editor, the user can swap out the
default editor for another.

Is this something a newbie can understand and use effectively? (That’s
not a rhetorical question, I really don’t know what the answer might
be.)

On Thu, Apr 14, 2011 at 10:46:02AM +0900, Vincent M. wrote:

I would hesitate to call it an IDE, though, as from your description it
doesn’t appear to include any kind of editor. Thus while it’s extremely
useful for experimenting with Ruby (hence the name), it’s not going to
be ideal for helping newbies learn to write programs in Ruby.

Is there any chance you might want to push this project a bit further
and include a basic editor?

Include interactive_editor with a default editor on the system and it
suddenly has a text editor – without having to bundle the text editor
with the Ruby package. Even better, because the text editor is not tied
to the IDE except by way of interactive_editor, the user can swap out
the
default editor for another.

On Thu, Apr 14, 2011 at 01:58:25PM +0900, Vincent M. wrote:

not a rhetorical question, I really don’t know what the answer might
be.)

I think that, if it’s set up automatically, it’ll be easier for the
newbie to grasp than the concept of a REPL itself. It’s also easily
ignorable if the user just wants to play around in the REPL without an
editor.

freeride, but probably not active

On Apr 13, 6:29am, Martin DeMello [email protected] wrote:

martin

There’s always Komodo, which has been supporting Ruby since 2004.

The advantage of a multi-language IDE is that it stays up to date –
I’m
adding CoffeeScript support to it right now, answering this question
during
a compile.

… which is over. Time to test it.

  • Eric

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