Scalablity question (Stand-alone server)

I have lately heard a lot about the productivity gains that a
programmer can reap with Ruby on Rails. And the features such as
“Shared Nothing”, which allow you to
increase scalabilty by adding more servers. This, however, won’t help
much in my case, since, I won’t need to deploy my app on anything more
than a stand-alone server. (dual xeon, perhaps)

As for ASP.NET 2.0, I would like to know how the DataSet and
Databinding (and the other GUI controls such as GridView) stack up to
the RoR offerings.

QUESTION: Since my app probably won’t scale beyond what a single server
could deliver, would using the Databinding techniques, which are also
very productive, be sufficient?
(ie. Would a programmer be as productive using Databiding as he/she
would be using the RoR data access methods? Would the application be as
scalable?)

I am still am still very much a novice and would appreciate some help.
Thank you!
Also, this post should not start a flame war concerning which language
is better, I am just a noob looking for some answers.

Scalability on one comp is all about caching.

Asp.Net should whoop RoR’s ass in terms of performance if you do the
right
things with it.

This however might be a bit harder then it sounds :slight_smile:

Can you get Asp.Net to be as quick as RoR absolutely !!!
Can it be as productive in creating websites, sure.
( when used with things like code generation and a good IDE )

[email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Aemca,
Thanks for the response!

It seems that the real difficulity with ASP.net 2.0 is learning ado.net
(from what I have heard)

[email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Can you get Asp.Net to be as quick as RoR absolutely !!!
Can it be as productive in creating websites, sure.
( when used with things like code generation and a good IDE )

btw, by ‘code generation’, did you mean the code generated by VS 2005?\

I meant something like:

www.mygenerationsoftware.com
or
http://codesmithtools.com

in combination with some OR mapper software to behave like activerecord.

like dOOdads or .NetTiers:
http://www.mygenerationsoftware.com/portal/dOOdads/Overview/tabid/63/Default.aspx

But the code generation in VS.Net is also nice allthough I would
consider it
more prototyping / demo quality code.

Using one of these mappers will make things quite easy.

Can you get Asp.Net to be as quick as RoR absolutely !!!
Can it be as productive in creating websites, sure.
( when used with things like code generation and a good IDE )

btw, by ‘code generation’, did you mean the code generated by VS 2005?\

On Tue, 11 Jul 2006, [email protected] wrote:

I have lately heard a lot about the productivity gains that a
programmer can reap with Ruby on Rails. And the features such as
“Shared Nothing”, which allow you to
increase scalabilty by adding more servers. This, however, won’t help
much in my case, since, I won’t need to deploy my app on anything more
than a stand-alone server. (dual xeon, perhaps)

As for ASP.NET 2.0, I would like to know how the DataSet and
Databinding (and the other GUI controls such as GridView) stack up to
the RoR offerings.

I can’t speak to the specific pros or lack thereof regarding ASP.NET 2.0
versus RoR. However, speaking in general terms about a productive Ruby
web devel framework when developing sites/apps that aren’t going to
scale
beyond a single server, I have had fantastic success with Ruby.

Kirk H.

Aemca wrote:

Scalability on one comp is all about caching.

Asp.Net should whoop RoR’s ass in terms of performance if you do the
right
things with it.

This however might be a bit harder then it sounds :slight_smile:

Can you get Asp.Net to be as quick as RoR absolutely !!!
Can it be as productive in creating websites, sure.
( when used with things like code generation and a good IDE )

You also gain access to more databases that those that RoR considers
important.
You gain access to 100’s of components.
You can actually find websites that are actually using it in a profound
and complex way.

ASP.NET .vs RoR is like Mike Tyson .vs Richard Simmons.

But I will say that Ruby is a joy to code with!

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