Ruby TK GUI question


#1

Hi,

I am writing a Ruby GUI TK application where the top-most portion of the
screen is a line of static menu buttons. I would like the remaining
lower
portion of the screen to be dynamic - as an example, one of the top
static
buttons is pressed, in response to that, another window appears in the
dynamic area where someone can press more buttons, someone presses on of
those, which then draws a data window, erasing the window which had the
buttons, then someone closes the data window which brings the user back
to
the window which was drawn in response to the button press from the
static
button in the top portion of the screen.

Any references to Ruby TK function names would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Harry


#2

Hi Harry!

On Fri, 17 Feb 2006, Harry T. wrote:

Any references to Ruby TK function names would be greatly appreciated.

Disclaimer: I know squat about Ruby-Tk, but against the day that I
need to know, I’ve kept this link handy:

http://www.jbrowse.com/text/rubytk_en.html

Cheers,


#3

Harry T. wrote:

Hi,

I am writing a Ruby GUI TK application …

Any references to Ruby TK function names would be greatly appreciated.

The Tcl/Tk manual is easy to find with google, for example:
http://www.tcl.tk/man/tcl8.4/TkCmd/contents.htm

  1. Ensure this works:
    require ‘tk’

  2. To convert the Tk widget commands to Ruby class names, prepend “Tk”
    and capitalise,
    for example the Tcl/Tk “entry” command becomes the Ruby class
    “TkEntry”

  3. To apply an option, just use the tk option name without the leading
    ‘-’,
    for example “-relief” is just “relief”.

  4. Options can be set in two different ways, either:
    a. provide a hash of option value pairs, the option name is a string:
    example { ‘relief’ => ‘ridge’, ‘width’=>3 }
    and hand this hash over as a parameter (you don’t necessarily
    need { } in a method call), or
    b. provide a block, e.g. to new
    entry = TkEntry.new(root) do
    justify ‘center’
    width 3
    borderwidth 3
    relief ‘ridge’
    end
    # notice the option names are not quoted here, but look like
    method names

The other thing you might want to do is take a look at this Ruby/Tk
tutorial
http://members.chello.nl/~k.vangelder/ruby/learntk/

I haven’t read this, but it looked interesting:
http://www.syngress.com/book_catalog/183_Ruby/sample.htm

HTH
GB-)