Ruby Project Ideas to get someone hired

I have started learning Ruby this past week and have down the basics of
loops, filters, strings, arrays, hashes, functions, etc.

Since I have no professional experience with the language, I figured I
would complete a few projects on my own and see if I can get hired
somewhere.

What kinds of small projects might a beginning Ruby programmer take on
that
would demonstrate enough skill to get hired? Is Ruby code enough or
would
it have to be an actual Rails app?

p.s. I have no idea how to deploy a rails application - environment
seems
impossible to set up - yes I have followed more than 5 tutorials
exactly.
Prob doesn’t help I’m on a Windows 64 bit machine as it seems certain
dll
files and other things get messed up easily.

Colby

A good idea is to switch to a Unix OS first if you plan to get hired :wink:

On Fri, Feb 01, 2013 at 04:15:13AM +0900, Colby C. wrote:

p.s. I have no idea how to deploy a rails application - environment seems
impossible to set up - yes I have followed more than 5 tutorials exactly.
Prob doesn’t help I’m on a Windows 64 bit machine as it seems certain dll
files and other things get messed up easily.

Colby


Markus S.

Phone: +49 201 / 360 379 14
Fax: +49 201 / 360 379 16
Web: www.seonic.net
Email: [email protected]
Twitter: twitter.com/m_b_j
OS-Code: github.com/mbj

Environment setup wise, running a Linux VM makes life a lot more
enjoyable.

Project wise, I’ve done a lot of meandering this past year, hopefully
some
of these will sound fun to you:

  1. Pacman with Gosu Library
  2. Bullet Hell Game with Gosu Library (which was largely a Box2D
    collision
    project)
  3. Reddit Crawler/Bot
  4. IRC Client/Bot - Hooks into SVN and will post messages when
    regressions
    are broken.
  5. PunchCard/Hour Logging system with Sinatra
  6. Static Website Generator

Gosu in itself doesn’t provide the executable packaging. Gosu is the 2D
game library.

In terms of packaging, you want to look here:
https://www.ruby-toolbox.com/categories/packaging_to_executables

There are a couple options if you want the final output to be a self
contained .exe. And yes, it’s a pretty awesome experience when you have
a
final product that you can run with a single executable =D

On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 12:41 PM, Colby C.

Thank you Ricky. Pacman seems like a fun project. It sounds like Gosu
allows me to work with just Ruby and a few gems. It also allows me to
create an executable file once my program is complete. It is my
understanding in that case the user who runs the executable would not
need
to have ruby or anything else in particular installed on their machine
in
order to run.

Do I understand correctly?

Colby

On 02/01/2013 08:15 AM, Colby C. wrote:

p.s. I have no idea how to deploy a rails application - environment
seems impossible to set up - yes I have followed more than 5 tutorials
exactly. Prob doesn’t help I’m on a Windows 64 bit machine as it
seems certain dll files and other things get messed up easily.

Colby

Maybe write some useful puppet modules?

Sam

Releasy is the gem shown on the Gosu page for packaging an .exe from
what I
saw.

I installed the gosu gem, copy pasted about 10 lines of code, ran it and
got a window with text! It pretty rare that I can use example code and
actually have it work! Thanks again. :slight_smile:

Hello,

On 31 Ιαν 2013, at 20:15 , Colby C. [email protected]
wrote:

I have started learning Ruby this past week and have down the basics of loops,
filters, strings, arrays, hashes, functions, etc.

Since I have no professional experience with the language, I figured I would
complete a few projects on my own and see if I can get hired somewhere.

What kinds of small projects might a beginning Ruby programmer take on that
would demonstrate enough skill to get hired? Is Ruby code enough or would it have
to be an actual Rails app?

p.s. I have no idea how to deploy a rails application - environment seems
impossible to set up - yes I have followed more than 5 tutorials exactly. Prob
doesn’t help I’m on a Windows 64 bit machine as it seems certain dll files and
other things get messed up easily.

Colby

Mind you, I’m not an expert. Actually, I’m a newbe/amateur programmer
and I’ve received 2 job offers just because I put some lines of code
with sinatra and sqlite on github. Of course I didn’t take the job
because I’m not a programmer.

However, in my view apart from your own projects, it would “pay a lot”
to get active and involved with current “hot projects” like octopress
(instead building your own static website generator), nokogiri (ruby
gem), ROR, spree (e-commerce solution) and so on. As for your own
project, I’d do gladly something I need not something just for the
sake of doing it.

best regards,

Panagiotis (atmosx) Atmatzidis

email: [email protected]
URL: http://www.convalesco.org
GnuPG ID: 0xE736C6A0
gpg --keyserver x-hkp://pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys 0xE736C6A0

A good start is writing documentation or helping it become better. :slight_smile:


Carlos A.

Control engineering
Polytechnic School, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Computer engineering
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, USA

2013/1/31 Colby C. [email protected]

Thanks for the input Panagiotis. When I figure out how to use Github, I
will definitely use it more. The only problem with the theory of
“something useful” vs. “something for the sake of doing it” is that to
do
useful things is incredibly difficult for someone who can’t run the
simplest ROR example application after so many tutorials and walk
through
videos which teach me nothing.

One thing about joining a project is that I have no idea what others are
doing. Checked out Gnome, Mozilla, etc. and again after hours of
reading
found nothing that would actually help me start doing something useful
as a
beginner (yes I’m on the Gnome beginner list). Coding has never been my
problem. I can probably code in any language easy enough (logic is
logic).
It’s integrating thousands of libraries, packages, dll’s, plugins,
environment b.s., etc. with my code and deploying it that seems
impossible
to me at this point. If I ever found someone who could explain what is
necessary to deploy a ROR app - meaning no assumptions about
requirements -
and it actually worked on my computer, I would probably just die of
shock.
(Lynda.com’s walk through of rails doesn’t work, the tutorials on the
main
rails site doesn’t work, etc.) I recently followed Google’s tutorial on
how to make a simple ruby script to create a file on Drive (literally
copy/paste .rb code, a couple gem installs). Didn’t work. Tried for
almost 2 hours to figure it out then gave up. Same old story time and
time
again. The only thing that does work is running standalone ruby file,
or
the Gosu package mentioned earlier in thread.

Maybe after switching to Linux, some problems will go away.

Eternally Frustrated with Programming Education,

Colby

On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 3:18 PM, Panagiotis A.

Colby

Am also new in Ruby and i understand the frustration.

Two books i found amazing resources, since they make the assumption that
you are indeed a newbie are:

Agile Web D. with Rails by Dave T.
Beginning Ruby From Novice to Professional by Peter C.

you may also wanna check this series of videos on youtube.

It is 30 hours step by step on deploying A RoR application. I don’'t
think you can find a better freebie out there

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSXDqiI4sC5MvxXseYrhUdmQ4IQ7uL5JR

Hope that helps

theodore

Thanks Matt. I just installed virtual box, ubuntu 12.10 32 bit, is up
and
running fine. Was not able to get any “gem list” like I was in Windows,
but trying to see if RVM can fix it for me. Installing right now so
fingers crossed.

Best of luck, Colby – Ruby is the most fun programming language I’ve
used since Lisp. In addition to learning how to code in Ruby, you
should also be definitely looking at the whole ecosystem out there for
testing, writing, debugging, storing, and deploying applications, be
they gems, rails apps, sinatra apps, desktop apps, etc. I’m not at all
familiar with Windows-based development, so I can’t really recommend
tools and such, except what might be available cross-platform. Getting
up on a GNU/Linux VM might be really helpful, I can’t say for coming
from Windows. Something else is getting used to the *nix command line;
outside of my editing environemnt, and when I have to use the web for
things such as github, I practically live on the command line.

But most of all: Have Fun!

On Fri, 1 Feb 2013, Colby C. wrote:

p.s. I have no idea how to deploy a rails application - environment seems
impossible to set up - yes I have followed more than 5 tutorials exactly.
Prob doesn’t help I’m on a Windows 64 bit machine as it seems certain dll
files and other things get messed up easily.

From my experience, most Ruby folks seem to use Linux or OSX, Windows is
definitely a second class citizen in the Ruby ecosystem. So, if you can
go to running Linux (maybe Ubuntu in a virtual machine), you may be a
lot
better off.

– Matt
It’s not what I know that counts.
It’s what I can remember in time to use.

Everything worked! RVM, ruby 1.9.3, gem, node.js, sqllite3, webrick up
and
running. When I generated a new app, ran server, and saw ruby on
localhost:3000 I was overcome with joy. The virtual box by Oracle works
great. Out of the box networking, bi directional clipboard/drag-drop,
and
easy 3d acceleration to run Ubuntu 12.10 which now apparently only does
the
3d unity package.

I created my first controller/action, figured out (to some degree)
routing,
etc. Can’t wait to work on something now.

Tamouse, thanks. Having fun finally…

On Fri, Feb 1, 2013 at 8:02 PM, tamouse mailing lists <

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