Ruby on Rails certification(s)

Hello,

I want to ask if there are any “Ruby on Rails certifications” out there.
Even if they are not too much formal, I think it would be a good idea to
follow the requirements of a certificate especially for beginners so
they at least no the pathway to learning “Ruby on Rails”.

So, are there any certification programs on “Ruby on Rails”?

Thanks.

SW Engineer wrote in post #973310:

Hello,

I want to ask if there are any “Ruby on Rails certifications” out there.

Goodness, I hope not. A certification just says that you can pass a
test – it is no guarantee that you’re a good developer.

I think most employers sensible enough to adopt Rails in the first place
are also sensible enough to not care about that sort of certification.

Even if they are not too much formal, I think it would be a good idea to
follow the requirements of a certificate especially for beginners so
they at least no the pathway to learning “Ruby on Rails”.

Pathway:
Learn Ruby. Read the Rails Guides. Learn DB design. Practice!

So, are there any certification programs on “Ruby on Rails”?

Thanks.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Sent from my iPhone

Thanks @marnen. Well, I think in addition for the certificate to be some
sort of pathway, it can make you commited to learning.

If there is a certificate out there, that would be nice.

On 08 Jan 2011, at 16:35, SW Engineer wrote:

Thanks @marnen. Well, I think in addition for the certificate to be
some
sort of pathway, it can make you commited to learning.

If there is a certificate out there, that would be nice.

I’ve met my fair share of certified people that I would never hire…
ever… for anything. A certificate says nothing about a person except
that he can memorize a course. I’d rather see their work, look at
their online activity and go by results, not a piece of paper that
doesn’t mean a lot when it comes down to it.

Oh, and there isn’t a certificate out there. It could be a good new
business idea though and it might even make you some money, just like
street scams and selling certain goods through spam make people money.

Best regards

Peter De Berdt

Is there a more specific proposed pathway.

RUBY

Ruby home page: http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/

and the link they list for suggested Ruby books:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_n_5?ie=UTF8&rs=1000&keywords=Ruby&rh=i:aps,k:Ruby,i:stripbooks,n:1000,n:5

RAILS

http://railstutorial.org/ - a free on version of the book can be found
on the site - ebook, hard copy book and videos are available for a
price - in my use of them I’ve found them to be very good.

Thanks @Peter. So, can you propose a pathway you recommend someone new
to “Ruby on Rails” to follow to be a professional developer in RoR.

For example, @marnen proposed the following:

Pathway:
Learn Ruby. Read the Rails Guides. Learn DB design. Practice!

Is there a more specific proposed pathway. For example:

  • To START learning Ruby, check the following resources (i.e; Books,
    blogs,…etc)
  • To START learning Rails, check the following resources (i.e; Books,
    blogs,…etc)
  • After you gained the basics do the following (i.e; learn DB design,
    …etc)
  • The next step is to do the following (i.e; Project on GitHyb, …etc)

To get a detailed pathway from expert RoR developers will be of much of
help to us new to RoR.

Thanks a lot for your replies on this.

In Ruby and Rails the most important thing is experience and having
code on Github. Learn Ruby with the Pickaxe book, learn Rails with the
Rails Guides and ‘Agile Web D. with Rails (4rd edition)’,
learn BDD with ‘The RSpec Book: Behaviour-Driven Development with
RSpec, Cucumber, and Friends’. But, the most important thing is to
have some good code on github, so help in a project and create your
own project. This is what I am trying to do.

Cheers,

Riccardo

Dennis Major wrote in post #973530:

Is there a more specific proposed pathway.

RUBY

Ruby home page: http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/

and the link they list for suggested Ruby books:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_n_5?ie=UTF8&rs=1000&keywords=Ruby&rh=i:aps,k:Ruby,i:stripbooks,n:1000,n:5

RAILS

http://railstutorial.org/ - a free on version of the book can be found
on the site - ebook, hard copy book and videos are available for a
price - in my use of them I’ve found them to be very good.

Thanks @Dennis. Yes, I think http://railstutorial.org/would be a good
option.

Riccardo T. wrote in post #973592:

In Ruby and Rails the most important thing is experience and having
code on Github. Learn Ruby with the Pickaxe book, learn Rails with the
Rails Guides and ‘Agile Web D. with Rails (4rd edition)’,
learn BDD with ‘The RSpec Book: Behaviour-Driven Development with
RSpec, Cucumber, and Friends’. But, the most important thing is to
have some good code on github, so help in a project and create your
own project. This is what I am trying to do.

Cheers,

Riccardo

Thanks @Riccardo for the nice advice. I think it makes sense.

On 10 January 2011 09:21, rtacconi [email protected] wrote:

In Ruby and Rails the most important thing is experience and having
code on Github.
But, the most important thing is to
have some good code on github, so help in a project and create your

I certainly agree that getting lots of experience with a language is
good (although a fairly obvious tip). But I fail to see how “the most
important thing” is to have code on Github?
I don’t have anything on there other than a few Gists that I’ve put up
when helping people from this list. I use Mercurial as my SCM, so
Github isn’t much use to me, and the majority of the code I work on is
not open source - my clients would shoot me (worryingly literally for
one of them…) if I was to push their code to a 3rd party host.

If you mean that it’s a good thing to help publicly in a community;
then again, that’s true, but such a broad and flat statement as “most
important” doesn’t really help a discussion - especially when it’s not
necessarily even nearly true (as my case shows).

BTW how would you suggest someone gets “good code” on github as
opposed to “bad code”?.. there’s nothing in Github as a tool that
helps you learn to use Ruby or Rails, or to write “good” code (in
quotes, because the definition of “good” can vary depending on
context). I’d refer the OP to the previous posts on not taking
certification as point of fact of ability, and instead work through
the tutorials and the books, and learn the subject of OO programming
in some breadth - even if that includes learning some Java, PHP, C#,
etc too - all of which will improve your Ruby by having a larger
understanding of patterns used in development.