Ruby IDE


#1

Is there a standard IDE out there that most people use? I’m looking at
Mondrian and Arachno now, but I’m not sure which. I’m also looking at
FreeRIDE as well, but I don’t know.

Thanks a lot,

Matt


#2

On Apr 25, 2006, at 11:47 pm, SleepJunk13 wrote:

Is there a standard IDE out there that most people use? I’m looking at
Mondrian and Arachno now, but I’m not sure which. I’m also looking at
FreeRIDE as well, but I don’t know.

Try www.radrails.org

Or you could buy an iMac and TextMate :slight_smile:

Ashley


#3

On 4/25/06, SleepJunk13 removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

There is also the RDT plugin for Eclipse, and RadRails (which is also
based on Eclipse and the RDT plugin). Finally, there is ActiveState’s
Komodo IDE.

Curt


#4

Try www.radrails.org

Or you could buy an iMac and TextMate :)<<

I know of RadRails. I use it to work on my Rails apps, but it’s testing
and debugging isn’t great. I don’t need rails support in what I’m doing.
Just a nice ruby editor.

Thanks, though :slight_smile:


#5

Ryan L. wrote:

Myself and a lot of other people swear by VIM (www.vim.org) for Ruby
editing and for most other editing. It can take a while to learn, but
once you do it is extremely powerful.

I agree vim is very nice. A bit of a ramp up to learn the basics but
well worth it.

Btw, are there any cool auto-completion scripts out there for Ruby?


#6

On 4/25/06, SleepJunk13 removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

I know of RadRails. I use it to work on my Rails apps, but it’s testing
and debugging isn’t great. I don’t need rails support in what I’m doing.
Just a nice ruby editor.

Myself and a lot of other people swear by VIM (www.vim.org) for Ruby
editing and for most other editing. It can take a while to learn, but
once you do it is extremely powerful. It is also available on just
about every OS you can imagine. Today at work I did Java coding on
Windows using VIM, then just now I did some Ruby coding on Windows at
home, and later I’ll be coding C++ on BeOS using VIM. I started using
it on Linux.

Plus once you know VIM you’ll be able to use the standard vi installed
on most Unixes (though you’ll miss all the nice VIM features.)

Regards,
Ryan


#7

On 4/25/06, Ryan L. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Windows using VIM, then just now I did some Ruby coding on Windows at
home, and later I’ll be coding C++ on BeOS using VIM. I started using
it on Linux.

I’ve been using vim for light stuff for a while now, but it seems
inconsistent to me, and has been difficult to get used to. That is,
commands can take a number of different forms:

:set foo
:foo on
nfoo
:%foo

Plus there’s some commands you hit while in command mode, but then
others with ctrl characters while in insert mode (like Ctrl-d). Wait
though – there’s also some ctrl chars while in command mode too.

Besides that, in general I find myself slowed down constantly hitting
Ctrl-[, forgetting whether I’m in command mode or not. Either that, or
I’m filling my files with “:w” or “>>” or “i”, “b”, “w”…

Regarding FreeRIDE, I think development on it has slowed lately
because they’re working on getting wxRuby together. I believe that
future versions of FreeRIDE will probably use wxWidgets instead of
FOX.

Plus once you know VIM you’ll be able to use the standard vi installed
on most Unixes (though you’ll miss all the nice VIM features.)

What tends to keep me coming back is vim’s smart syntax highlighting.
It guesses how to syntax highlight different system config files very
well.

That said, on the desktop, so far, I’ve found NEdit to be most useful.


#8

When discussing Ruby IDEs, nobody has ever mentioned KDE Develop or
Quanta.
Latested versions of these have good ruby support.

Werner

SleepJunk13 wrote:

Is there a standard IDE out there that most people use? I’m looking at
Mondrian and Arachno now, but I’m not sure which. I’m also looking at
FreeRIDE as well, but I don’t know.

Thanks a lot,

Matt


#9

Werner Bohl wrote:

When discussing Ruby IDEs, nobody has ever mentioned KDE Develop or
Quanta.
Latested versions of these have good ruby support.

I don’t know what Quanta is. I thought KDE Develop was just
a GUI designer, is that not true?

Hal


#10

Yes there are, but only for VIM7 afaik, which is available for most
platforms
as well.
http://blog.hasno.info/blog/segfault/dev/2006/04/10/vim-7-ruby-omni-completion.html

I’ve also made a small collection of neat scripts/styles and bundled
them for
my own use.
http://www.manveru.net/stuff/best_of_ruby_for_vim.tar.gz
This provides you for example with a nice :Ri command, auto-insertion of
ends
and closes closures like ‘’ “” () [] {} ||.
There are still some little bugs in there that might need a fix, but so
far
i’m pretty satisfied :slight_smile:

also, to auto-indent a whole file type
gg=G

btw, a page that helped me a lot is http://jmcpherson.org/editing.html -
he
covers most of the useful commands
also be sure to check out vimtutor, which should be installed when you
install
vim automatically.

Hope that helps :slight_smile:


#11

once you do it is extremely powerful. It is also available on just
:foo on
nfoo
:%foo
<just kidding ;)>
You can say what you want OR
what you want, you can say but HEY
that won’t stop you to say what you really want is it? :stuck_out_tongue:

I mean, did you ever stop talking in English (or any other language for
that matter) just because there’s more than just one way/more ways/many
ways/not just one way (oh dear God, I’m confusing myself… this
English language is so hard, just like Vim… so many options…) to
express things… ? I don’t think so…
</;)>

Plus there’s some commands you hit while in command mode, but then
others with ctrl characters while in insert mode (like Ctrl-d). Wait
though – there’s also some ctrl chars while in command mode too.

Besides that, in general I find myself slowed down constantly hitting
Ctrl-[, forgetting whether I’m in command mode or not. Either that, or
I’m filling my files with “:w” or “>>” or “i”, “b”, “w”…
Being a 3 months Vim newbie, I had that problem too not too long ago (at
least in the first 2-3 days anyway…) so after digging around a little
I came up with a rather nice solution to it: I use the entire
statusbar’s
background color to tell me where I am: RED background == edit mode,
GREEN
background == normal mode.
Works like a charm :wink:

You better try the Ruby autocompletion as well:
http://blog.hasno.info/blog/segfault/dev/2006/04/10/vim-7-ruby-omni-completion.html
If you like syntax highlight, you’ll love that :wink:

All the best,
Alex


#12

On Apr 25, 2006, at 9:20 PM, John G. wrote:

editing and for most other editing. It can take a while to learn, but
:set foo
:foo on
nfoo
:%foo

Plus there’s some commands you hit while in command mode, but then
others with ctrl characters while in insert mode (like Ctrl-d). Wait
though – there’s also some ctrl chars while in command mode too.

Can’t argue with that

Besides that, in general I find myself slowed down constantly hitting
Ctrl-[, forgetting whether I’m in command mode or not. Either that, or
I’m filling my files with “:w” or “>>” or “i”, “b”, “w”…

You’re in command mode unless the bottom says
–INSERT–
or
–VISUAL–

I find ESC to be much faster than Ctrl-[, YMMV.


#13

John G. wrote:

home, and later I’ll be coding C++ on BeOS using VIM. I started using

Plus there’s some commands you hit while in command mode, but then
others with ctrl characters while in insert mode (like Ctrl-d). Wait
though – there’s also some ctrl chars while in command mode too.

Besides that, in general I find myself slowed down constantly hitting
Ctrl-[, forgetting whether I’m in command mode or not. Either that, or
I’m filling my files with “:w” or “>>” or “i”, “b”, “w”…

I guess there might be a few inconsistencies, but what drew me to vim
was pretty much the opposite feeling. Most editors have seemingly
random key bindings for running commands, and although they stay the
same because you are always in one mode, they are rarely as powerful as
vim. For example, the whole concept of filtering ranges of text through
commands is really genius. It mixes in perfectly with the unix
mentality, and it lets you compose your own commands from a simple set
of primitives. Sure, it might take a little practice to get the
commands down, but then you can mix and match to create virtually
infinite numbers of combinations. That’s just not possible or at least
not natural in other editors, and I used emacs for about 5 years before
my conversion… Beyond that, you can program it in ruby!

On that note, I have been working on a ruby plugin, SnippetMagic, for
vim that provides snippets functionality ala TextMate. It’s not method
completion, but it’s a sort of programmable macro system. You can read
descriptions and download it here:
http://blog.rosejn.net/articles/2006/02/28/snippetmagic-0-02

-Jeff


#14

SleepJunk13 wrote:

Is there a standard IDE out there that most people use? I’m looking at
Mondrian and Arachno now, but I’m not sure which. I’m also looking at
FreeRIDE as well, but I don’t know.

Thanks a lot,

Matt

Try jEdit with Ruby

http://jedit.org/
http://rubyjedit.org/


#15

Jonas H. wrote:

SleepJunk13 wrote:

Is there a standard IDE out there that most people use? I’m looking at
Mondrian and Arachno now, but I’m not sure which. I’m also looking at
FreeRIDE as well, but I don’t know.

Thanks a lot,

Matt

Try jEdit with Ruby

http://jedit.org/
http://rubyjedit.org/

I’ll take a look at jEdit later when I get home. I started using a trial
of Komodo last night and I like that. Have you seen any problems with
it?


#16

jedit is nice. i use it all the time and it’s got a few ruby plugins
(although i forget what they do).
Also there’s SubEthaEdit if you’re on a mac. The previous version is
available free for non-commercial use.

-Kate


#17

On 4/26/06, Alexandru E. Ungur removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

I came up with a rather nice solution to it: I use the entire statusbar’s
background color to tell me where I am: RED background == edit mode, GREEN
background == normal mode.

Can you share what you put in your .vimrc to configure that?


#18

sender: “Mark V.” date: “Wed, Apr 26, 2006 at 09:51:45PM +0900” <<<EOQ
On 4/26/06, Alexandru E. Ungur removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

I came up with a rather nice solution to it: I use the entire statusbar’s
background color to tell me where I am: RED background == edit mode, GREEN
background == normal mode.

Can you share what you put in your .vimrc to configure that?
Sure, here you go:

— .vimrc excerpt for statusbar highlighting —
" Only do this part when compiled with support for autocommands,
" You better have Vim7 'cause this does all the magic :slight_smile:
if has(“autocmd”)
augroup InsertStatus
au InsertEnter * hi StatusLine term=inverse,bold cterm=inverse,bold
ctermfg=red ctermbg=white
au InsertLeave * hi StatusLine term=inverse,bold cterm=inverse,bold
ctermfg=green ctermbg=white
augroup END
endif

" ensure statusline is always shown
set ls=2
" custom statusline
set statusline=%<file[%n]:\ %f\ %y%=\ %3lx%02c\ [%1*%M%*%R%H]\ %2P
" initial statusline highlighting
hi StatusLine term=inverse,bold cterm=inverse,bold ctermfg=green
ctermbg=white
hi StatusLineNC term=inverse,bold cterm=inverse,bold ctermfg=gray
hi User1 term=inverse,bold cterm=inverse,bold ctermfg=red
— end —

Adjust the colors as you see fit. I noticed the green looks too ugly on
plain xterm, but I use Terminal
(http://www.os-cillation.com/index.php?id=42&L=5)
and it looks quite nice there.

BTW, you also get a ‘red spot’ on the green statusbar when you have
unsaved changes, that feels nice too :wink:

Good luck,
Alex


#19

On Wednesday 26 April 2006 04:33 am, Jeff R. wrote:

For example, the whole concept of filtering ranges of text through
commands is really genius. It mixes in perfectly with the unix
mentality, and it lets you compose your own commands from a simple set
of primitives.

Can you give an example? The reason I ask is that I’m wondering if that
is
something fundamentally better / different than the macro language
facility
in nedit. With that, you can select some text, then run a macro against
it
to do almost anything you want.

(You do have to write the macro, but nedit also has keystroke recording
which
can give you a good start on many macros. (Almost??) every keyboard
command
is available in the macro language, along with others which have no
keyboard
counterpart (the first example that comes to mind are looping
constructs.)

Randy K.


#20

kate rhodes wrote:

jedit is nice. i use it all the time and it’s got a few ruby plugins
(although i forget what they do).
Also there’s SubEthaEdit if you’re on a mac. The previous version is
available free for non-commercial use.

-Kate

I use jEdit all the time, and I’ve found a number of very useful
plugins:
Ruby plugin (of course)
BufferTabs
Project Viewer
Fast Open
SuperAbbrevs - TextMate snippet-like functionality
Editor Scheme - create color schemes

One thing - on Windows, the Monaco font )which I believe is the default
for TextMate) with anti-aliasing looks really bad. A better choice
would be Bitstream Vera Sans Mono.