Ruby IDE

Hello,

Is there a good IDE for Ruby?
At the moment am using “vi”, plan to migrate to TextEditor under GNOME

I tried downloading ruby-ide from http://www.ruby-ide.com/
But it kept making me go round and round to get a trial version.

Best Regards,

~Mayuresh

please try NetBeans.

http://www.netbeans.org

Mayuresh K. wrote:

Hello,

Is there a good IDE for Ruby?
At the moment am using “vi”, plan to migrate to TextEditor under GNOME

Yikes! :slight_smile:

Stick with vi (or vim, really) and avail yourself of copious macros and
scripting goodness.

And get rtags, too. Helps makes code navigation in vim super bad.


James B.

www.happycamperstudios.com - Wicked Cool Coding
www.jamesbritt.com - Playing with Better Toys
www.ruby-doc.org - Ruby Help & Documentation
www.rubystuff.com - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff

On Fri, 2008-08-08 at 14:00 +0900, Mayuresh K. wrote:

~Mayuresh

It depends on your platform and your budget. KDevelop is free and open
source, but really runs well only on Linux with the KDE desktop. Komodo,
which is the one I use, is propietary but runs well on almost all
platforms. There are others, like Eclipse and NetBeans, but I haven’t
used them.

The key factor in choosing an IDE is the nature of the project. If it’s
a single-person project, use whatever works best for you. But if it’s a
multi-person project, even if only two, pick something that facilitates
communication among the team and with all of the other tools, especially
your source control, defect tracking, compilers, debuggers, etc.

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
ruby-perspectives.blogspot.com

“A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems.” –
Alfréd Rényi via Paul Erdős

Liang.Ye wrote:

please try NetBeans.

http://www.netbeans.org

I second NetBeans.

On Aug 8, 7:22 am, James B. [email protected] wrote:

And get rtags, too. Helps makes code navigation in vim super bad.


James B.

www.happycamperstudios.com - Wicked Cool Codingwww.jamesbritt.com - Playing with Better Toyswww.ruby-doc.org - Ruby Help & Documentationwww.rubystuff.com - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff

The good Ruby IDE is more about what do you need in particular moment.
I have spend long time testing and finding the right one for me. Here
is a first moment expressions about that process.
I spend my developing times on XP and Ubuntu. The Text Mate is
something that I would like to have but I have try some other
surrogates. My goal is to have almost the same development environment
on both systems.

I have start with SciTE and it is sufficient for the some ruby
programs of mine. Some time I still use it for a 100 line scripts on
XP.

Next Eclipse come along and it was good for a while on both OS. Latter
Aptana take over and after some updates I somehow fill the need to
switch to something new.

NetBeans 6 come with a fresh ruby and rails support and I jump right
in. I have some glitches and eats memory but it was fresh and
interesting. I still use it from time to time.

On XP I have try E-Text editor the windows clone of Text Mate. Very
good and productive but only on windows.

Now I am back to, my not mentioned love so far, VIM. Somehow it is
present on all systems and getting around with it can be a life saver.
It takes time to accommodate but it worth it and it is sufficiently
productive. The better you know it the greater Kung-Fu kata you can
perform. Sooner then latter you will find your self in production VPS
SSH terminal trying to fix something and VIM is there as your survival
swiss knife.

If this could have some point it can be:
you should try to find the IDE that suits you needs and to invest time
to try the others as well but always be prepare to use just a plain
text editor and command prompt.

I like working in NetBeans, but even on the Quad processor computer at
work, NetBeans can be sloooow, when it shouldn’t be. My one complaint
about NetBeans is that it eats memory for breakfast lunch and dinner.
Dejan’s experiences sound very similar to mine, except that I have
never tried VIM. I think I will give VIM a whirl. Thanks Dejan

~Jay

Jayson W. wrote:

I think I will give VIM a whirl.

If you’re gonna go with Vim, I highly recommend you buy O’Reilly’s book
on
learning Vi/Vim. Vi isn’t like any other text editors that you have used
before.

That being said, I encourage you to learn Vi, for in my opinion it is
one of the
most valuable skills a programmer can have.

-Dana

On Fri, Aug 8, 2008 at 12:01 PM, Dana M. [email protected] wrote:

If you’re gonna go with Vim, I highly recommend you buy O’Reilly’s book on
learning Vi/Vim. Vi isn’t like any other text editors that you have used
before.

That being said, I encourage you to learn Vi, for in my opinion it is one of
the most valuable skills a programmer can have.

Thanks Dana,
I’ve played with Vi while getting my feet wet with Linux, some time
ago. I agree Vi is not like anything you would traditionally find on
Windows systems. I just installed gvim, and when I opened it up, for
the first time, I let out a slight gasp. I had forgotten how ‘textual’
Vi is (even in gvim). No pretty windowed help screen, no pop up
alerts, just text. The up side is that Vi brings out a touch Spartan
in me, which is nice from time to time.

Thanks for the heads up Dana
~Jay

To piggy-back on and emphasize the importance of Dana’s point,

If you are or intend to become a programmer you should commit to
learning either VI or Emacs.

They are both ubiquitous, can be used on any language or file type and
have the same core of essential features…

  • Indenting, reformatting.
  • Syntax highlighting.
  • Auto-completion
  • Frames
  • Regions
  • Unlimited undo and redo.
  • Multiple cut and paste clipboards.
  • Spell checking.
  • Multiple language support (including Unicode, R-to-L for Hebrew,
    Arabic, etc.)
  • Extensible
    • Macros and functions.
    • Fully customizable keys vs. actions.
  • Handle text strings, full lines, rectangles.
  • Adapt to type of file (.txt, .c, .html, etc.) being edited.
  • No line length or file size limits, within reason.
  • Automatically handle UNIX, MAC, DOS line endings (LF, CR, CRLF
    respectively).
  • Binary file editing.
  • Well documented, both internally and via available books and ebooks.
  • Large user/support community

that allow your text editing to expand to true sensi black-belt
olympic telepathic grand-master 9-Dan ninja-type powers. ultimately
the effort spent learning the tool will be more than re-payed in your
increased efficiency.

Sorry if this turned a little proselytising.

Thanks – Eric

I took the feature list mainly from
http://www.prismnet.com/~dierdorf/emacsvi.html which incidentaly is
the first google hit for “vim emacs”

On Saturday, August 9, at 01:01, Dana M. wrote:

Jayson W. wrote:

I think I will give VIM a whirl.

If you’re gonna go with Vim, I highly recommend you buy O’Reilly’s
book on
learning Vi/Vim. Vi isn’t like any other text editors that you have
used before.

That being said, I encourage you to learn Vi, for in my opinion it is
one of the
most valuable skills a programmer can have.

-Dana


Dana M. - System A.
Integrated Computer Solutions, Inc.
54B Middlesex Tpke, Bedford, MA 01730
617.621.0060 x112 - http://www.ics.com

On Fri, Aug 8, 2008 at 12:22 AM, James B. [email protected]
wrote:

Mayuresh K. wrote:

Is there a good IDE for Ruby?
Yikes! :slight_smile:

Stick with vi (or vim, really) and avail yourself of copious macros and
Mayuresh,

As someone who absolutely loves coding in NetBeans and all the
niceties of it, keep your vim handy, as well as scite.

NetBeans
Like I said, I love using NetBeans but:

  • It’s a pain when you just need to edit one or two files.
  • It’s a pain for small projects & one off scripts.
  • It’s rather slow to load up.

Scite
When NetBeans is to slow to load, or I’m doing a one off, or a just a
quick edit, I say Scite.
It’s got good text highlighting
It’s got code folding
It has other features, but I don’t care about them.
Still, it’s X only, and you don’t always have X, so…

VIM!
All that said, I still use vim extensively for coding in ruby, sh, etc.
It’s on everything
It loads fast
Easy to search through large scripts
Good text highlighting

Just a few thoughts
–Kyle

On Sat, 2008-08-09 at 03:06 +0900, Kyle S. wrote:

Scite
When NetBeans is to slow to load, or I’m doing a one off, or a just a
quick edit, I say Scite.
It’s got good text highlighting
It’s got code folding
It has other features, but I don’t care about them.
Still, it’s X only, and you don’t always have X, so…
Scite used to run on Windows – did that change?

VIM!
All that said, I still use vim extensively for coding in ruby, sh, etc.
It’s on everything
It loads fast
Easy to search through large scripts
Good text highlighting
It runs on Windows. :slight_smile:
There’s a book called “Hacking Vim”.
It has a nice Ruby scripting interface.

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
ruby-perspectives.blogspot.com

“A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems.” –
Alfréd Rényi via Paul Erdős

On Sat, 2008-08-09 at 01:39 +0900, Jayson W. wrote:

ago. I agree Vi is not like anything you would traditionally find on
Windows systems. I just installed gvim, and when I opened it up, for
the first time, I let out a slight gasp. I had forgotten how ‘textual’
Vi is (even in gvim). No pretty windowed help screen, no pop up
alerts, just text. The up side is that Vi brings out a touch Spartan
in me, which is nice from time to time.

Gvim on Windows has a more-or-less full-featured menu, mouse, etc. GUI.
You can, if you want, use Gvim like Notepad. :wink:

Except Notepad won’t save a file with Unix line endings. :wink:

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
ruby-perspectives.blogspot.com

“A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems.” –
Alfréd Rényi via Paul Erdős

On Fri, Aug 8, 2008 at 12:25 PM, Eric S. [email protected]
wrote:

To piggy-back on and emphasize the importance of Dana’s point,

If you are or intend to become a programmer you should commit to
learning either VI or Emacs.

WoW… I’ve always wanted true sensi black-belt olympic telepathic
grand-master 9-Dan ninja-type powers. If Vi is the way, then let me
atum…
Just one more reason to learn something new!
Hoooya! Boy am I syked!
Watch this flying somersault backflip kick… with a twist…
ouch! ; )

~Jay

On Sat, 2008-08-09 at 01:01 +0900, Dana M. wrote:

Jayson W. wrote:

I think I will give VIM a whirl.

If you’re gonna go with Vim, I highly recommend you buy O’Reilly’s book on
learning Vi/Vim. Vi isn’t like any other text editors that you have used before.

Unless you’re really a rank beginner, I’d pass up “Learning Vi/Vim” and
pick up “Hacking Vim”.


M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
ruby-perspectives.blogspot.com

“A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems.” –
Alfréd Rényi via Paul Erdős

On Fri Aug 8 14:00:54 2008, Mayuresh K. wrote:

~Mayuresh

Two words: GNU Emacs[1]

[1] http://gnu.org/software/emacs

Jayson W. wrote:

I like working in NetBeans, but even on the Quad processor computer at
work, NetBeans can be sloooow, when it shouldn’t be. My one complaint
about NetBeans is that it eats memory for breakfast lunch and dinner.
Dejan’s experiences sound very similar to mine, except that I have
never tried VIM. I think I will give VIM a whirl. Thanks Dejan

~Jay

Like other people are saying, Netbeans has been quite good for me. I
have a 4-gig laptop :slight_smile:

I started using it in place of vim because it was easier to jump between
files in a rails application (there are keys to jump from models to
tests, controllers to views or tests etc).

I love the vim/vi way of dealing with text. You’ve got climb a small
hill to understand how to use it when you’re starting out, once you do,
it’s hard to go back. A lot of people will never make that climb
though.

Some other things regarding netbeans

  • the jvi extension - do everything netbeans offers AND edit text like
    vi/vim - that’s what sold me about netbeans
    (http://jvi.sourceforge.net/)
  • in-built rails / ruby project handling
  • mercurial - netbeans handles mercurial quite well; not sure about git
  • that’s gotta be there though
  • code changes are displayed (green - new, blue - changed, red - delete
    on the files you are editing and changed files are highlighted; just a
    nice touch
  • it takes a year for it start up on my ubuntu laptop - no idea why.

Daniel

M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

VIM!
All that said, I still use vim extensively for coding in ruby, sh, etc.
It’s on everything
It loads fast
Easy to search through large scripts
Good text highlighting
It runs on Windows. :slight_smile:
There’s a book called “Hacking Vim”.
It has a nice Ruby scripting interface.

Scite still runs on windows.

On Saturday 09 August 2008 09:53:12 Fred P. wrote:

~Mayuresh

Two words: GNU Emacs[1]

[1] http://gnu.org/software/emacs

Have you tried the eclipse plugins for Ruby? To my mind eclipse provides
the
most comprehensive IDE you could wish for with the appropriate plugins.
There
are also good plugins for rails, svn etc etc and all the other tools
you
might wish to use
David

I second emacs

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