Ruby editor for linux


#1

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I
usually use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve
tried Kate, Emacs, and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t
say I’m very productive editing Ruby code with any of them.


#2

Juan Z. wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I
usually use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve
tried Kate, Emacs, and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t
say I’m very productive editing Ruby code with any of them.

vim. If you typed vi, you probably got vim, but configured in
“vi-compatible” mode. Try this:

touch ~/.vimrc
vimtutor


#3

For quick scripts I’m fond of SciTE. It’s slick, no nonsense coding
goodness.

Some pros & cons

Pros:
lightweight (both cpu and memory)
color syntax highlighting
code folding
multiple files open as tabs
run & debug ruby (and other languages)
runs pretty much identically in Linux, *BSD, OSX, Windows

Cons:
limited to 10 open tabs
printing is sometimes flaky
occasional crashes (about once every few months)
line numbers not on by default
can run in windows…

yes, note the whine tags. They aren’t really problems for me.

–Kyle


#4

I use NetBeans Ruby edition. I’m very happy with it.


#5

On Thu, Apr 9, 2009 at 12:38 AM, Ben L. removed_email_address@domain.invalid
wrote:

http://redcareditor.com/

looks promising, but i have a problem building it on ruby1.9 on
linux… maybe i will wait more :wink:


#6

On Wed, Apr 8, 2009 at 4:01 PM, Juan Z. removed_email_address@domain.invalid
wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I usually
use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve tried Kate, Emacs,
and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t say I’m very productive
editing Ruby code with any of them.

Although it is still in it’s relative infancy Redcar is shaping up
nicely
and well worth a look. Particularly since most TextMate bundles are
compatible.

http://redcareditor.com/

Ben


#7

i use Gedit with some useful plug-in , and it do my work excellent


#8

le 08/04/2009 18:39, Mark T. nous a dit:

I use NetBeans Ruby edition. I’m very happy with it.

And RadRails (standalone or as an Eclipse plugin) is not bad for pure
Ruby projects too… But it’s a resource hog !


#9

Juan Z. wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I
usually use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve tried
Kate, Emacs, and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t say I’m
very productive editing Ruby code with any of them.

nedit is nice — with ruby config in:

http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/ruby_nedit


#10

I like Bluefish. Easy to use, supports Ruby highlighting (and almost
everything else) and has project support.


#11

Juan Z. wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I
usually use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve
tried Kate, Emacs, and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t
say I’m very productive editing Ruby code with any of them.

I use Diakonos. Certainly my preference for terminal/tty/ssh editing –
it probably won’t supplant GUI editors.

Written entirely in Ruby, extremely configurable, easy to use, and made
especially for people that couldn’t or don’t want to figure out emacs
and vi(m). If you can do something in Ruby or with a shell one-liner,
you can assign a key to do it in Diakonos.

Homepage: http://purepistos.net/diakonos
Announcements: http://blog.purepistos.net/?s=diakonos
IRC: irc.freenode.net #mathetes


#12

I use bluefish since 4 years and although there are many features I
never need, and some things I lack, I consciously stopped to use either
vim or emacs - because i think that this is a plague of linux which
prevents good GUIs from emerging. The hardcore Linux fans will probably
never understand this, but if everyone uses vim or emacs, evolution will
not happen in “GUI-country”.


#13

Kyle S. escribió:

For quick scripts I’m fond of SciTE. It’s slick, no nonsense coding goodness.

Some pros & cons

Cons:
limited to 10 open tabs

That’s only the default configuration, change “buffers=10” on the
configuration file for as many as you want.

Cheers


#14

On Apr 8, 8:17 pm, Michael S. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

I like Bluefish. Easy to use, supports Ruby highlighting (and almost
everything else) and has project support.


Posted viahttp://www.ruby-forum.com/.

I use Emacs with emacs-starter-kit and Rinari for Rails. But you can
take a look at E-Texteditor (http://www.e-texteditor.com/). It seems
like it is free for linux and it looks a lot on TextMate and you can
find source on github.


#15

Juan Z. wrote:

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I
usually use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve
tried Kate, Emacs, and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t
say I’m very productive editing Ruby code with any of them.

There’s one written in ruby called arcadia
http://github.com/angal/arcadia/tree/master which will hopefully develop
into something nice :slight_smile:
That being said, I did learn today that komodo edit has a fuzzy finder
like textmate’s [ctrl+shift+o I think].
Cheers!
-=r


#16

Mark T. wrote:

I use NetBeans Ruby edition. I’m very happy with it.

I second that, sort of. :slight_smile:

I much prefer some variation on vim, but I’ve worked with folks who have
vouched for the powers of Netbeans, folks who also like Textmate.

There is a vi plugin for Netbeans, but it was still not as comfortable
for me as actual vim. However, if emacs or vim are not your choice, the
project management code, completion, refactoring tools, Rake
integration, built-in help, and other Ruby niceties in Netbeans are
really good.

I strongly recommend taking the time to learn vim or emacs, but
otherwise use Netbeans.


James B.

www.jamesbritt.com - Playing with Better Toys
www.ruby-doc.org - Ruby Help & Documentation
www.rubystuff.com - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff


#17

On Wed, Apr 8, 2009 at 2:27 PM, Marc H. removed_email_address@domain.invalid
wrote:

I use bluefish since 4 years and although there are many features I
never need, and some things I lack, I consciously stopped to use either
vim or emacs - because i think that this is a plague of linux

Anyone who uses Emacs then claims to have “stopped” probably never
really used it much to start with.

which
prevents good GUIs from emerging. The hardcore Linux fans will probably
never understand this,

You don’t want to really learn the APIs you develop with, I see… you
need auto-complete to compensate for lack of experience, I completely
understand.

but if everyone uses vim or emacs, evolution will
not happen in “GUI-country”.

Sure it will, we will just ignore your silly time-wasting mouse-driven
apps and continue to use Emacs and vim as if you hadn’t even brought
it up.


#18

On Thu, Apr 9, 2009 at 12:57 AM, Marc H. removed_email_address@domain.invalid
wrote:

I use bluefish since 4 years and although there are many features I
never need, and some things I lack, I consciously stopped to use either
vim or emacs - because i think that this is a plague of linux which
prevents good GUIs from emerging. The hardcore Linux fans will probably
never understand this, but if everyone uses vim or emacs, evolution will
not happen in “GUI-country”.

So, have you filed any bugs or submitted any feature requests to
Bluefish?

martin


#19

Does anyone have any suggestions for a Ruby editor on Linux? I
usually use TextMate on the mac. I’m running Kubuntu and I’ve tried
Kate, Emacs, and vi. At least with the default setup I can’t say I’m
very productive editing Ruby code with any of them.

http://arcadia.rubyforge.org/ may be worth checking out.

saji

Saji N. Hameed

APEC Climate Center
1463 U-dong, Haeundae-gu, +82 51 745 3951
BUSAN 612-020, KOREA removed_email_address@domain.invalid
Fax: +82-51-745-3999


#20

Pedro W. wrote:

Kyle S. escribió:

For quick scripts I’m fond of SciTE. It’s slick, no nonsense coding goodness.

Some pros & cons

Cons:
limited to 10 open tabs

That’s only the default configuration, change “buffers=10” on the
configuration file for as many as you want.

And add

line.margin.visible=1

to have line numbers turned on by default.

Steve