Ruby Beginner Books

Dear all,

I want to learn Ruby P.ming language. I found many book for Ruby.
But i
dont know which book is the right one for me (Beginner Level). I want to
learn OOP Concepts with RUBY.

Many thanks in advance
regards,

koko

On 6/12/07, Salai K. [email protected] wrote:

Dear all,

I want to learn Ruby P.ming language. I found many book for Ruby. But i
dont know which book is the right one for me (Beginner Level). I want to
learn OOP Concepts with RUBY.

There was a recent thread about this.
http://blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/vframe.rb/ruby/ruby-talk/254621?254587-255153

and welcome to Ruby!

I recommend http://hacketyhack.net/.

If this is your first steps into programming, I recommend “Learn to
Program”, C. Pine: http://pine.fm/LearnToProgram/

If you are learning Ruby, I recommend “The Ruby Way”:
http://rubyhacker.com/coralbook/. The ‘pickaxe’ book “Programming
Ruby” is the definitive reference book (a version is available free
online).

Want to learn Ruby and RubtOnRails? see “Ruby for Rails”
http://www.bookpool.com/sm/1932394699

I recommend bookpool.com for technical books, they have the best
pricing I have found.

On 6/12/07, Salai K. [email protected] wrote:

Dear all,

I want to learn Ruby P.ming language. I found many book for Ruby. But
i
dont know which book is the right one for me (Beginner Level). I want to
learn OOP Concepts with RUBY.

I wouldn’t be doing my job right if I weren’t to recommend, simply…

Beginning Ruby by, er, me.
http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-Ruby-Professional-Peter-Cooper/dp/1590597664/

Some of the other recommendations are very good, but only Chris P.'s
“Learn to Program” book is the other one suitable for total newcomers to
OOP. The other books assume prior OOP knowledge to a certain extent
(which
is why Beginning Ruby was written in the first place). “Learn to
Program” is
particularly useful if you are very new to programming overall (not just
OOP). “Beginning Ruby” is more useful if you have a rough idea of what’s
involved (such as if you’ve done a little BASIC, HTML, or any other form
of
structural data processing) and just want to learn Ruby. The Pickaxe
would
then be worth moving onto as a reference and The Ruby Way as an
exploration
into more advanced concepts once you’re up to speed.

Cheers,
Peter C.
http://www.rubyinside.com/

On Wed, Jun 13, 2007 at 08:00:19AM +0900, Peter C. wrote:

I wouldn’t be doing my job right if I weren’t to recommend, simply…
involved (such as if you’ve done a little BASIC, HTML, or any other form of
structural data processing) and just want to learn Ruby. The Pickaxe would
then be worth moving onto as a reference and The Ruby Way as an exploration
into more advanced concepts once you’re up to speed.

“Everyday Scripting with Ruby” doesn’t seem to assume any previous
experience with (or even knowledge of) OOP. Maybe I should look through
it again to see if I missed something. I rather suspect that you just
haven’t given that one a look (it’s still pretty new on the market).
What it does assume, though, is a certain amount of familiarity with
simple programming, however – at minimum, having learned some basic
concepts of programming from BASIC or Logo in your youth, or perhaps
from
browsing the programming subreddit a lot. Even DOS batch scripting and
shell usage on Unix might qualify you as sufficiently knowledgeable to
be
able to tackle Everyday Scripting with Ruby, if you’re a quick study.

On Wed, Jun 13, 2007 at 05:28:25AM +0900, Salai K. wrote:

Dear all,

I want to learn Ruby P.ming language. I found many book for Ruby. But i
dont know which book is the right one for me (Beginner Level). I want to
learn OOP Concepts with RUBY.

By far, my best experience with a relatively novice-oriented Ruby book
has been with “Everyday Scripting with Ruby”, available from the
Pragmatic Programmers. It even gets you started on test-driven
development.

On 6/13/07, Chad P. [email protected] wrote:

“Everyday Scripting with Ruby” doesn’t seem to assume any previous
experience with (or even knowledge of) OOP. Maybe I should look through
it again to see if I missed something. I rather suspect that you just
haven’t given that one a look (it’s still pretty new on the market).

No, I have not, although I’ve read a few reviews and got the impression
it’s
more of a pragmatic “how to do stuff” book rather than one that
specifically
dives into the whys and wherefores of things like OOP, which the OP
seemed
to be looking for. That said, this is a reasonably uninformed opinion as
I
have not read the book itself. The book certainly sounds commendable
from a
“getting things done” point of view, as the title suggests. I was just
picking up on the OP’s stress on wanting to learn “OOP concepts”
explicitly.

Cheers,
Peter C.
http://www.rubyinside.com/

Ruby is definitely the best way to do OOP conceptually, because
everything (almost) is already an object.
but, you can still just hammer out short functional or procedural
code as you please.

In this order:

Learn to Program, the Chris P. book, if you are an absolute
beginner with no knowledge of programming.
you won’t get deep into anything with it though.

Beginning Ruby, the Peter C. book, this is definitely the next
step. Some concepts will be completely new for you, that’s ok, they
don’t go too deep, just getting you used to lots of different
available things to do with Ruby.

Everyday Scripting with Ruby, this one should probably come next.
Maybe even before doing some of the last chapters of Peter’s book.
The exercises here are really designed to take you to the next level
and make you understand things without hurting you. There is also a
wonderful glossary in the back. Well, heck, it’s a Pragmatic
Programmers production!

After these, you should be ready to tackle a lot more stuff.

All the while, you should have the Pickaxe handy as a reference and
casual toilet browsing. It really does contain the nitty gritty on a
lot of stuff you will eventually ask about. It’s not a great tutorial
though.

In addition, you should consider the Ruby Cookbook, the Ruby Way, and
any of the Rails books out there, you can learn a lot of cool tricks
from the Rails stuff that carries over back to other Ruby.

If you get into Rails, you will also need, but should probably have
anyway, an SQL or MySQL book. Not a big one, necessarily. The little
purple phrasebook will do fine, and David Black’s, Ruby for Rails
book teaches you almost all the MySQL you will need. After that you
can pick up more SQL if you feel you need it.

Dear all,

Thankyou very much for all this information. I think i will start again
with
“Learn to programm”.
I have been programming in PHP language… but i am still Beginner
level. :slight_smile:
:slight_smile: :frowning:

regards,

salai.

On Wed, Jun 13, 2007 at 08:16:49AM +0900, Peter C. wrote:

dives into the whys and wherefores of things like OOP, which the OP seemed
to be looking for. That said, this is a reasonably uninformed opinion as I
have not read the book itself. The book certainly sounds commendable from a
“getting things done” point of view, as the title suggests. I was just
picking up on the OP’s stress on wanting to learn “OOP concepts” explicitly.

Until someone writes a book specifically about OOP that doesn’t assume
previous knowledge of the language, I think something like EDSR’s
approach may be the best for early introduction of OOP for someone that
doesn’t know the language and doesn’t know programming very well. Chris
Pine’s book would be more suitable for someone that doesn’t know
programming at all.

Just my two cents.

On Fri, Jun 15, 2007 at 06:23:14AM +0900, Salai K. wrote:

Dear all,

Thankyou very much for all this information. I think i will start again with
“Learn to programm”.
I have been programming in PHP language… but i am still Beginner level. :slight_smile:
:slight_smile: :frowning:

It sounds like Chris P.'s book will be an excellent fit, then.

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