RoR on IDE for Beginner

Should I use an IDE for beginning with Rails?

On 28 February 2013 03:50, Stewart A. [email protected]
wrote:

Should I use an IDE for beginning with Rails?

In my opinion, no. Others may disagree. At least start with no IDE
in order to understand the underlying commands. Once you have the
basics then you can try IDEs to see if they offer you any advantages.

My standard advice to beginners is to work right through a good
tutorial such as railstutorial.org, which is free to use online. Also
I recommend using Linux (eg Ubuntu) or Mac for development.

Colin

There’s no need to use an IDE to code with Rails. Text Editor such as
VIM
or Sublime Text 2 would be enough!

Best Regards,
Ryan Cheung

On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 11:50 AM, Stewart A.

On 28 February 2013 10:28, Pardeep D. [email protected] wrote:

Hey,

According to me you should not use any IDE. Instead if you are ubuntu
you can use gedit with its plugins for autocomplete and indentation
etc…

I like jEdit for the editor, with its excellent project viewer plugin
and code parsing with sidekick.

Colin

Hey,

According to me you should not use any IDE. Instead if you are ubuntu
you can use gedit with its plugins for autocomplete and indentation
etc…

On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 4:33 AM, Colin L. [email protected]
wrote:

Colin
Emacs, baby, all the way! :slight_smile:

You can add sublime packages for almost anything including code
completion.

I use Vim with Rails.vim , Omnicomplete and I don’t need anything other
than this for my RoR development.
If you hate remember key mappings ( which takes longer time in Vim with
definitely worth Productivity )
I would recommend Sublime 2 which is light weight with tons of features
and customization support.

Never end up with any heavy weight IDE’s like Netbeans , Aptana or
Rubymine.

I’ve used :

  • Sublime Text 2 - Wonderful editor, still my favorite. Fast, light
    and
    great customization. By default it won’t complete your code which is
    great
    while learning a language.
  • Rubymine - We use this at work. It’s nice, bit sluggish but it has
    great code completion and with keybindings you can jump to method
    definitions really easily. Great if you want to see what’s going on
    in
    Rails internals.
  • vim - I am not a power vim user, but if you get to that level this
    is
    probably the best editor. I’ve never seen more productive developers
    than
    those that use this thing. It’s awesome.
  • Geany (linux) - Great little editor that will have a lot of
    functionality of sublime out of the box if you need something on the
    cheap.
  • TextWrangler(mac) - Fast and light. Not nearly as many features as
    sublime text but wonderful still the same.
  • Aptana - This was alright, slow and not my favorite.

I’ve used others but those are the ones I can remember. Honestly the
top
two are my favorites.

I am RoR begginer too. And I’ve started with terminal and sublime text2.
This way helps me to understand RoR internals, common commands and
other.
But in future I’m planing to use RubyMine, because it can improve
development speed.

, 28 2013 ., 7:50:20 UTC+4 Stewart A.
:

On 7 March 2013 14:05, Matt J. [email protected] wrote:

spam for some kind of Chinese electronics supply site.
You can’t delete posts on a mailing list. This is not a forum.

Colin

On Wednesday, 6 March 2013 04:17:08 UTC-5, Ruby-Forum.com User wrote:

I’ve never seen more productive developers than those that use this
thing. It’s awesome.
[SPAMTACULAR SEO URL SNIPPED]

Can somebody ban “nannasin” and delete all the posts by that user? Total
SEO spam for some kind of Chinese electronics supply site.

–Matt J.

I would suggest you use as little non-RoR baggage as possible when
starting
out. An editor that does auto indent and context color highlighting is
nice, if you’re already comfortable with it. Also avoid rvm initially,
and
git, and any db other than sqlite. All these items have there own
learning
curve that will just confuse you - it’s hard to discriminate the true
source of an error if you have too many poorly understood layers between
you and your code.

Make an extra effort to learn on a Mac or Ubuntu system. Do not use
windoze, it’s like touching the third rail in the subway or licking the
metal pole in the winter. If you haven’t yet gotten comfortable with
unix,
this is the only complex tool you need to put between yourself and RoR.

The hardest part for me was (and continues to be) debugging.
Particularly
difficult are errors that occur during application startup as these are
just as likely to come from your run time environment as your code and
are
not always well described.

Follow the rails tutorial, get comfortable with the architecture by
building small projects. Remeber that many people have run through the
tutorial so it’s unlikely to include errors. If it does include errors
google “rails tutorial your error message” and you will find a thread.
I
think the Dave T. book “Programming Ruby” is among my best
purchases,
my copies are all dogeared from continued use.

I personally use emacs with the rinari package but I’ve been using emacs
since 1980 so the learning curve is not an issue. It’s nice to have an
editor that you can carry across platforms.

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