Rio 0.3.7

Announcing Rio 0.3.7

== Overview

Rio is a Ruby I/O convenience class wrapping much of the functionality
of IO, File and Dir. Rio also uses FileUtils, Tempfile, StringIO,
OpenURI, Zlib, and CSV to provide similar functionality using a simple
consistent interface. In addition to forwarding the interfaces
provided by IO, File, and Dir to an appropriate object, Rio provides a
“grande” interface that allows many common application-level I/O and
file-system tasks to be expressed succinctly.

== New

Support for Pipe operator

Pipe multiple commands

rio(‘afile’) | rio(?-,‘acmd’) | ‘another_cmd’ | ?-

run the same series of commands, with different input and/or output

cmdpipe = rio(?-,‘acmd’) | rio(?-,‘another_cmd’)
rio(‘infile1’) | cmdpipe | rio(‘outfile1’)
rio(‘infile2’) | cmdpipe | rio(‘outfile2’)

cmdpipe2 = rio(?|,‘cmd1’,‘cmd2’,rio(‘outfile’)) # a cmdpipe Rio
rio(‘infile1’) | cmdpipe2 # run with input coming from a file
rio(?-) | cmdpipe2 # same commands with input from stdin

Improved support for MS Windows paths containing drives and UNC paths.
rio(‘D:/adir/afile’)
rio(’//ahost/adir/afile’)

== SYNOPSIS

For the following assume:
astring = “”
anarray = []

Copy or append a file to a string
rio(‘afile’) > astring # copy
rio(‘afile’) >> astring # append

Copy or append a string to a file
rio(‘afile’) < astring # copy
rio(‘afile’) << astring # append

Copy or append the lines of a file to an array
rio(‘afile’) > anarray
rio(‘afile’) >> anarray

Copy or append a file to another file
rio(‘afile’) > rio(‘another_file’)
rio(‘afile’) >> rio(‘another_file’)

Copy a file to a directory
rio(‘adir’) << rio(‘afile’)

Copy a directory structure to another directory
rio(‘adir’) >> rio(‘another_directory’)

Copy a web-page to a file
rio(‘http://rubydoc.org/’) > rio(‘afile’)

Ways to get the chomped lines of a file into an array
anarray = rio(‘afile’).chomp[] # subscript operator
rio(‘afile’).chomp > anarray # copy-to operator
anarray = rio(‘afile’).chomp.to_a # to_a
anarray = rio(‘afile’).chomp.readlines # IO#readlines

Copy a gzipped file un-gzipping it
rio(‘afile.gz’).gzip > rio(‘afile’)

Copy a plain file, gzipping it
rio(‘afile.gz’).gzip < rio(‘afile’)

Copy a file from a ftp server into a local file un-gzipping it
rio(‘ftp://host/afile.gz’).gzip > rio(‘afile’)

Iterate over the entries in a directory
rio(‘adir’).entries { |entrio| … }

Iterate over only the files in a directory
rio(‘adir’).files { |entrio| … }

Iterate over only the .rb files in a directory
rio(‘adir’).files(’*.rb’) { |entrio| … }

Iterate over .rb files but not symlinks to .rb files
rio(‘adir’).files(’*.rb’).skip(:symlink?) { |entrio| … }

Iterate over only the dot files in a directory
rio(‘adir’).files(/^./) { |entrio| … }

Iterate over the files in a directory and its subdirectories, skipping
‘.svn’ and ‘CVS’ directories

rio(‘adir’).norecurse(/^.svn$/,‘CVS’).files { |entrio| … }

Create an array of the .rb entries in a directory
anarray = rio(‘adir’)[’*.rb’]

Create an array of the .rb entries in a directory and its
subdirectories.
anarray = rio(‘adir’).all[’*.rb’]

Iterate over the .rb files in a directory and its subdirectories
rio(‘adir’).all.files(’*.rb’) { |entrio| … }

Iterate over the non-empty, non-comment chomped lines of a file
rio(‘afile’).chomp.skip.lines(:empty?,/^\s*#/) { |line| … }

Copy the output of th ps command into an array, skipping the header
line and the ps command entry
rio(?-,‘ps -a’).skip.lines(0,/ps$/) > anarray

Prompt for input and return what was typed
ans = rio(?-).print("Type Something: ").chomp.gets

Change the extension of all .htm files in a directory and its
subdirectories to .html
rio(‘adir’).rename.all.files(’*.htm’) do |htmfile|
htmfile.extname = ‘.html’
end

Create a symbolic link ‘asymlink’ in ‘adir’ which refers to
‘adir/afile’
rio(‘adir/afile’).symlink(‘adir/asymlink’)

Copy a CSV file, changing the separator to a semicolon
rio(‘comma.csv’).csv > rio(‘semicolon.csv’).csv(’;’)

Iterate through a CSVfile with each line parsed into an array
rio(‘afile.csv’).csv { |array_of_fields| …}

Create a tab separated file of accounts in a UNIX passwd file,
listing only the username, uid, and realname fields
rio(’/etc/passwd’).csv(’:’).columns(0,2,4) > rio(‘rpt’).csv("\t")

== Contact

Project:: http://rubyforge.org/projects/rio/
Documentation:: http://rio.rubyforge.org/
Bugs:: http://rubyforge.org/tracker/?group_id=821
Email:: [email protected]

== Copyright
Copyright © 2005,2006 Christopher Kleckner. All rights reserved

== License
Rio is released under the GNU General Public License
(http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html)

-Christopher Kleckner

On Thu, 5 Jan 2006, rio4ruby wrote:

Announcing Rio 0.3.7

Great! That solved my problem with rio#mkdir with 0.3.4 under linux!
Thanks everybody for the really intensive help and the massive number
(1)
of reactions to my mails (5) about that problem!

rio4ruby wrote:

file-system tasks to be expressed succinctly.
Bravo !

… Because :
… It is very useful.
… It is well documented.

I just had a quick look at the doc, I’m a newbie and I didn’t understand
everything, things will be clearer when I’ll use Rio.

Thanks !

== Contact

Very nice!

Another step that Ruby makes to dominate the world!

here are more things in heaven and earth,
horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.


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Duane J. wrote:

Copy a gzipped file un-gzipping it
rio(‘afile.gz’).gzip > rio(‘afile’)

Why does ‘gzip’ unzip? How would one zip something up?

Rio#gzip puts a Rio in gzip mode, so the referenced
file will be read from and written to properly. We could
rewrite the example:

a_rio_referencing_a_gzipped_file = rio('afile.gz).gzip
a_rio_referencing_a_file = rio(‘afile’)
a_rio_referencing_a_gzipped_file > a_rio_referencing_a_file

How would one zip something up?

Turn the arrow around:
rio(‘afile.gz’).gzip < rio(‘afile’)

Curious… why does +all+ take square brackets when +files+ uses
parens? Seems inconsistent upon first viewing.

Both +files+ and +all+ are configuration methods.

The usage:

anarray = rio(‘adir’).all[’*.rb’]

is syntactic sugar for

anarray = rio(‘adir’).all.entries(’*.rb’).to_a

The abbreviated usage works because:

  1. Rio#entries is the default selection method when iterating
    over directories.
  2. The subscript operator passes its arguments to the most
    recently called selection method (in this case +entries+,
    even though it was never explicitly called) before it
    calls +to_a+.
  3. Rio#all returns the Rio which called it. (All configuration
    methods do this, to support the readable shortened syntax)

Since Rio#files is also a configuration method, it can be used
similarly:

rio(‘adir’).files(’.rb’) { |f| … } # iterate over .rb files
rio(‘adir’).files[’
.rb’] # returns an array of .rb files
rio(‘adir’).files(’*.rb’) > ‘bdir’ # copies .rb files to ‘bdir’

Hope this helps.
-Christopher

Hi Christopher! This is my first time looking at Rio, and I’m very
impressed! I have a few interface questions for you–things that
jumped out at me on my initial viewing of the examples. Again, this
is coming from a white page here, so take it either as “how a new guy
sees the library” or with a grain of salt :slight_smile:

On Jan 4, 2006, at 9:17 PM, rio4ruby wrote:

Announcing Rio 0.3.7

> Copy a gzipped file un-gzipping it > rio('afile.gz').gzip > rio('afile') > Why does 'gzip' unzip? How would one zip something up? > Iterate over .rb files but not symlinks to .rb files > rio('adir').files('*.rb').skip(:symlink?) { |entrio| ... } > > Iterate over only the _dot_ files in a directory > rio('adir').files(/^\./) { |entrio| ... } > > Create an array of the .rb entries in a directory and its > subdirectories. > anarray = rio('adir').all['*.rb'] > Curious... why does +all+ take square brackets when +files+ uses parens? Seems inconsistent upon first viewing.

Super work! I look forward to using this in the future.

Duane J.
(canadaduane)
http://blog.inquirylabs.com/

Thanks Christopher,

I just started using Rio and it’s very handy.

I’m trying to get Rio to work with file names that have a space in
them. E.g “Foo B.”.

Works

rio(‘foobar’) << “testing” # no space in file name

Does not work

rio("“foo bar”") << “testing”
rio(‘foo\ bar’) << “testing”
rio(“foo bar”) << “testing”
rio(‘foo\sbar’) << “testing”
rio(“foo\sbar”) << “testing”

I’m running on WinXP and installed Ruby with the one click installer.
I installed Rio with

gem install rio
but that got me 0.3.4

I’ve not been able to figure out how to specify a particular version
for gem to use.

gem install rio --source http://rubyforge.org/frs/download.php/7291/rio-0.3.7.gem

“c:\ruby\bin\ruby.exe” “c:\ruby\bin\gem” install rio --source http://rubyforge.org/frs/download.php/7291/rio-0.3.7.gem
Attempting local installation of ‘rio’
Local gem file not found: rio*.gem
Attempting remote installation of ‘rio’
Updating Gem source index for:
http://rubyforge.org/frs/download.php/7291/rio-0.
3.7.gem
ERROR: While executing gem … (ArgumentError)
parse error on line 0, col 11: `data.tar.gz’

did not work for me

Any help appeciated.

Thanks,
Dale

On Jan 9, 2006, at 4:38 PM, rio4ruby wrote:

a_rio_referencing_a_gzipped_file = rio('afile.gz).gzip

The abbreviated usage works because:
similarly:

rio(‘adir’).files(’.rb’) { |f| … } # iterate over .rb files
rio(‘adir’).files[’
.rb’] # returns an array of .rb
files
rio(‘adir’).files(’*.rb’) > ‘bdir’ # copies .rb files to ‘bdir’

Hope this helps.
-Christopher

Fantastic! Thanks again. I’m loving Rio more and more :slight_smile:

Duane J.
(canadaduane)
http://blog.inquirylabs.com/

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