RFuzz 0.7 -- Win32, Bug Fix, Browser Begins

Hello Everyone,

Another release of RFuzz to announce:

http://rfuzz.rubyforge.org/

DESCRIPTION

RFuzz is an HTTP client library that you can use in combination with a
random junk generator to conduct fuzzing tests against any HTTP server
(or web app). It’s not limited to fuzzing, as the HTTP client can work
as a Net/HTTP replacement, and you can easily just make regular
requests.

Fuzzing is where you try to give a web application lots of randomly
generated unexpected inputs in an attempt to break it and find new areas
to write unit tests. It compliments other testing methods. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuzzing for additional information.

This is the library I’ll be using in my RubyConf talk.

CHANGES

The 0.7 release fixes a bad bug in the request headers, fixes a rare
chunked encoding error, and adds a new example that uses the fresh
RFuzz::Browser class. Look at examples/cl_watcher.rb for a simple
script that I’m using to watch apartment listings on craigslist.

This release also supports win32 precompiled binaries.

INSTALL

Everyone should be able to install it with:

sudo gem install rfuzz

Or on window just “gem install rfuzz”. Windows people pick the win32
version as it’s the one that’s precompiled.

EXAMPLE REST CLIENT

This example is from the samples page:
http://rfuzz.rubyforge.org/sample.html

class RESTClientError < Exception; end

class RESTClient
def initialize(host,port, base="")
@host, @port = host, port
@base = base
@client = RFuzz::HttpClient.new(host,port)
end

def target_uri(symbol)
uri = @base + “/” + symbol.to_s.tr("_","/")
end

def method_missing(symbol, *args)
res = @client.get(target_uri(symbol), :query => (args[0] || {}))
raise_error_if(res.http_status != “200”,
“Invalid Status #{res.http_status} from server
#{@host}:#{@port}”)
return REXML::Document.new(res.http_body).root
end

def raise_error_if(test, msg)
raise RESTClientError.new(msg) if test
end

end

This example just takes simple:

client.users_find :name => “joe”

And translates them to:

GET /users/find?name=joe

Requests on the fly and then returns an REXML docroot.

Enjoy!

Zed S. wrote:

Hello Everyone,

Another release of RFuzz to announce:

http://rfuzz.rubyforge.org/

Or on window just “gem install rfuzz”. Windows people pick the win32
version as it’s the one that’s precompiled.

I just ran ‘gem install rfuzz’ on my WinXP box, and was given the choice
of installs. Selecting the first one returned a 404:

Select which gem to install for your platform (i386-mswin32)

  1. rfuzz 0.7 (mswin32)
  2. rfuzz 0.7 (ruby)
  3. rfuzz 0.6 (ruby)
  4. Cancel installation

1
ERROR: While executing gem … (OpenURI::HTTPError)
404 Not Found

I checked the rubyforge.org rfuzz download page, which lists the mswin32
gem, but clicking the link for a manual download also gives a 404

http://rubyforge.rubyuser.de/rfuzz/rfuzz-0.7-mswin32.gem is broken.


James B.

“Blanket statements are over-rated”

On Sat, Aug 05, 2006 at 06:40:39AM +0900, James B. wrote:

Or on window just “gem install rfuzz”. Windows people pick the win32
version as it’s the one that’s precompiled.

I just ran ‘gem install rfuzz’ on my WinXP box, and was given the choice
of installs. Selecting the first one returned a 404:
[…]

I checked the rubyforge.org rfuzz download page, which lists the mswin32
gem, but clicking the link for a manual download also gives a 404

http://rubyforge.rubyuser.de/rfuzz/rfuzz-0.7-mswin32.gem is broken.

It takes quite a long time before the packages get propagated to the
mirrors
(around 11H when I released rcov yesterday).

On Sat, 2006-08-05 at 16:07 +0900, Alex Y. wrote:

Zed S. wrote:

In case anybody’s wondering…

Rehearsal -------------------------------------------------------
net/http 7.720000 1.470000 9.190000 ( 9.195841)
rfuzz 3.040000 1.070000 4.110000 ( 4.119992)
--------------------------------------------- total: 13.300000sec

                       user     system      total        real

net/http 7.930000 1.370000 9.300000 ( 9.298725)
rfuzz 2.950000 1.130000 4.080000 ( 4.073578)

Yeah it should be faster just by virtue of having very little to it and
using a C parser. Keep in mind that rfuzz–unlike mongrel–isn’t really
designed for speed but more for letting you easily hit web servers with
any kind of request. Another thing some folks don’t notice is that all
of the HttpClient requests are “data driven”. That means you can power
RFuzz blindly from a YAML file full of strings and hashes.

Otherwise net/http has a bunch more features, but I’ll slowly add them
as I need them. I think SSL is next on the list.

That doesn’t include those speedups for net/http that went through the
list a couple of weeks back, though.

I’d also be curious for the same test run with the RFuzz call being done
inside a Timeout block. RFuzz doesn’t do any of that (bare metal), and
I know Timeout blocks fire up an extra thread and eat up a bit more CPU.
I’m betting that putting RFuzz inside Timeout makes it about the same
speed at net/http.

Zed S. wrote:

Hello Everyone,

Another release of RFuzz to announce:

http://rfuzz.rubyforge.org/
Yay!

In case anybody’s wondering…

[email protected]:~/Desktop/Noodling/ruby$ ruby -v; cat rfuzz_test.rb; ruby
rfuzz_test.rb
ruby 1.8.4 (2005-12-24) [i486-linux]
require ‘mongrel’
require ‘rfuzz/client’
require ‘net/http’
require ‘benchmark’

h = Mongrel::HttpServer.new(‘0.0.0.0’, ‘8080’)
h.register(’/’, Mongrel::DirHandler.new(’.’))
h.run

def do_download(h, path)
h.get(path) # quack!
end

n = 1000

Benchmark.bmbm(20) do |b|
u = URI.parse(‘http://localhost:8080/rfuzz_test.rb’)
busted = Net::HTTP.new(u.host, u.port)
b.report(‘net/http’){for i in 0…n; do_download(busted, u.path); end}
hotness = RFuzz::HttpClient.new(u.host, u.port)
b.report(‘rfuzz’){for i in 0…n; do_download(hotness, u.path); end}
end

Rehearsal -------------------------------------------------------
net/http 7.720000 1.470000 9.190000 ( 9.195841)
rfuzz 3.040000 1.070000 4.110000 ( 4.119992)
--------------------------------------------- total: 13.300000sec

                       user     system      total        real

net/http 7.930000 1.370000 9.300000 ( 9.298725)
rfuzz 2.950000 1.130000 4.080000 ( 4.073578)

That doesn’t include those speedups for net/http that went through the
list a couple of weeks back, though.

Zed S. wrote:

net/http 7.720000 1.470000 9.190000 ( 9.195841)
using a C parser. Keep in mind that rfuzz–unlike mongrel–isn’t really
list a couple of weeks back, though.

I’d also be curious for the same test run with the RFuzz call being done
inside a Timeout block. RFuzz doesn’t do any of that (bare metal), and
I know Timeout blocks fire up an extra thread and eat up a bit more CPU.
I’m betting that putting RFuzz inside Timeout makes it about the same
speed at net/http.

Not quite:

[email protected]:~/Desktop/Noodling/ruby$ cat rfuzz_test.rb; ruby
rfuzz_test.rb
require ‘mongrel’
require ‘rfuzz/client’
require ‘net/http’
require ‘benchmark’
require ‘timeout’

m = Mongrel::HttpServer.new(‘0.0.0.0’, ‘8080’)
m.register(’/’, Mongrel::DirHandler.new(’.’))
m.run

def do_download(h, path)
h.get(path)
end

def do_timeout_download(h, path)
timeout(30){
h.get(path)
}
end

n = 1000

Benchmark.bmbm(20) do |b|
u = URI.parse(‘http://localhost:8080/rfuzz_test.rb’)
h = Net::HTTP.new(u.host, u.port)
b.report(‘net/http’){ for i in 0…n; do_download(h, u.path); end }
r = RFuzz::HttpClient.new(u.host, u.port)
b.report(‘rfuzz’){ for i in 0…n; do_download(r, u.path); end }
b.report(‘rfuzz+timeout’){
for i in 0…n; do_timeout_download(r, u.path); end }
end
Rehearsal -------------------------------------------------------
net/http 8.000000 1.380000 9.380000 ( 9.609907)
rfuzz 3.110000 1.090000 4.200000 ( 4.213084)
rfuzz+timeout 3.660000 1.270000 4.930000 ( 4.933268)
--------------------------------------------- total: 18.510000sec

                       user     system      total        real

net/http 8.060000 1.480000 9.540000 ( 9.620967)
rfuzz 3.090000 1.090000 4.180000 ( 5.725728)
rfuzz+timeout 3.680000 1.230000 4.910000 ( 4.991043)

But then again, that’s not what Net::HTTP’s actually doing - it puts a
timeout around every single rbuf_fill call, so by default it has to
spawn a new thread for every 1K of data it intends to receive. I’m sure
there’s a damn good reason for that, but it’s a reason I don’t think I’d
have spotted if I was writing it. That shouldn’t be a problem on this
test, though - the file it’s downloading is only 715 bytes. I’ll try
the test with a bigger file and see what I can see.

Alex Y. wrote:

Zed S. wrote:

I’d also be curious for the same test run with the RFuzz call being done
inside a Timeout block. RFuzz doesn’t do any of that (bare metal), and
I know Timeout blocks fire up an extra thread and eat up a bit more CPU.
I’m betting that putting RFuzz inside Timeout makes it about the same
speed at net/http.

Not quite:

But then again, that’s not what Net::HTTP’s actually doing - it puts a
timeout around every single rbuf_fill call, so by default it has to
spawn a new thread for every 1K of data it intends to receive. I’m sure
there’s a damn good reason for that, but it’s a reason I don’t think I’d
have spotted if I was writing it.
Ok, having actually stopped and thought about it for a second, I can see
why they’ve done that.

That shouldn’t be a problem on this
test, though - the file it’s downloading is only 715 bytes. I’ll try
the test with a bigger file and see what I can see.

[email protected]:~/Desktop/Noodling/ruby$ ruby rfuzz_test.rb
Rehearsal -------------------------------------------------------
net/http 7.890000 1.490000 9.380000 ( 9.411633)
net/http big 1055.150000 119.690000 1174.840000 (1185.696163)
rfuzz 2.840000 0.990000 3.830000 ( 4.065557)
rfuzz+timeout 3.380000 1.190000 4.570000 ( 4.569331)
rfuzz big 169.730000 47.670000 217.400000 (218.332456)
rfuzz+timeout big 205.470000 59.000000 264.470000 (271.745557)
------------------------------------------- total: 1674.490000sec

                       user     system      total        real

net/http 7.880000 1.470000 9.350000 ( 9.454987)
net/http big 1056.710000 113.930000 1170.640000 (1173.337412)
rfuzz 2.850000 0.980000 3.830000 ( 3.831175)
rfuzz+timeout 3.420000 1.180000 4.600000 ( 4.609152)
rfuzz big 175.550000 45.900000 221.450000 (221.584886)
rfuzz+timeout big 205.930000 55.530000 261.460000 (262.673411)

The .*big results are from downloading the results of dd if=/dev/zero
of=big_file bs=1M count=1… that is, 1MB of zeros. Interesting.

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