REST perhaps I don't undestand it

I find hard to work with rest and custom actions.
I have an action

def logout
session[:user = nil
end

for controller user.
In my view I call <%= link_to "Logout’, :action => ‘logout’.
When I click on link the error is:

Couldn’t find Ruser with ID=logout

My routes.rb has resources :rusers.
How I must call logout action?

you have a typo on your model name in controller.

On Sep 10, 7:52 am, radhames brito [email protected] wrote:

for controller user.
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There appear to be several typos:

session[:user = nil
should be:
session[:user = nil] (missing ])

<%= link_to "Logout’, :action => ‘logout’.
should be:
<%= link_to ‘Logout’, :action => ‘logout’ %> (inconsistent " and ’
around Logout; and missing %> )

My routes.rb has resources :rusers.
Try putting the following line into routes.rb:
map.connect ‘user/logout’, :controller => ‘user’, :action => ‘logout’

On 10 September 2010 15:40, Sandy [email protected] wrote:

session[:user = nil

There appear to be several typos:

session[:user = nil
should be:
session[:user = nil] (missing ])

Or should be session[:user] = nil
Is that the same?

Couldn’t find Ruser with ID=logout

My routes.rb has resources :rusers.

the above means your user model has a diferent name than the one you are
usign

On 10 September 2010 16:13, radhames brito [email protected] wrote:

Couldn’t find Ruser with ID=logout

My routes.rb has resources :rusers.

the above means your user model has a diferent name than the one you are
usign

I think it is correct.
Model is Ruser, resources :rusers is set by scaffold I have not set it.

On 10 September 2010 15:40, Sandy [email protected] wrote:

My routes.rb has resources :rusers.
Try putting the following line into routes.rb:
map.connect ‘user/logout’, :controller => ‘user’, :action => ‘logout’

But…I have to set a route for every custom action that I add to
controller?

Msan M. wrote:

On 10 September 2010 15:40, Sandy [email protected] wrote:

�session[:user = nil

There appear to be several typos:

�session[:user = nil
�should be:
�session[:user = nil] (missing ])

Or should be session[:user] = nil
Is that the same?

No, Sandy was in error.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Either that, or (not recommended really) you can enable the catch all
route in routes.rb by uncommenting the line towards the bottom that
looks like:

match ‘:controller(/:action(/:id(.:format)))’

but read the line above that, which tells you that if you do that,
you’ll enable access to all actions in all controllers; probably not
what you want to do.
On Sep 10, 2010, at 2:04 PM, Mauro wrote:

On 10 September 2010 15:40, Sandy [email protected] wrote:

My routes.rb has resources :rusers.
Try putting the following line into routes.rb:
map.connect ‘user/logout’, :controller => ‘user’, :action => ‘logout’

This would be correct if you were on rails 2, but according to your
earlier post, you said you’ve got resources :rusers, which would only
work in rails3, I think. So, to add the custom route, do this:

match ‘/rusers/logout’ :to=>‘rusers#logout’

Go here and do some reading:

http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/routing.html

That should give you plenty to chew on and at least make the simple
routing stuff clear.

Hope that helps you.

Msan M. wrote:

On 10 September 2010 15:40, Sandy [email protected] wrote:

�My routes.rb has �resources :rusers.
�Try putting the following line into routes.rb:
�map.connect ‘user/logout’, :controller => ‘user’, :action => ‘logout’

But…I have to set a route for every custom action that I add to
controller?

Yes. . . and No.

If you insist on using a custom method in your controller then yes, you
will have to specify a route for it. However, you really should be
looking at things from the point of view of utilizing only the basic
crud actions of create, show, update and delete.

Consider what the verb logout implies. Logout from what? A session?
Then what are we actually doing with respect to a session? Deleting it?
Then perhaps the problem is that you really need another controller, say
user_sessions_controller, and that the delete action in that controller
is what should perform the logout action.

Keep in mind that in web applications speaking of logging in and out is
at best a very shaky metaphor and not a description of what is really
happening. One does not log on to a web application, one creates an
authenticated session. So long as that session persists then the
browser can consume the private resources provided by the web app. Once
the session is destroyed then the browser cannot consume those
resources.

In my opinion, this is the secret to thinking about REST, putting
everything in terms of the four basic verbs. If you are thinking in
terms of custom methods then you are probably not thinking REST.

On 11 September 2010 04:46, James B. [email protected] wrote:

Yes. Â . Â . and No.
is what should perform the logout action.
So I’ve to do something like this?

class SessionsController < ApplicationController

def destroy
session[:cas_user] = nil
session.delete(:casfilteruser)
CASClient::Frameworks::Rails::Filter.logout(self, rusers_url)
end

end

and in html.erb page:

<%= link_to ‘Logout’, :controller => ‘sessions’, :action => ‘destroy’ %>

I think it is still not REST.
I’m confused.

On Sep 10, 1:58 pm, Marnen Laibow-Koser [email protected] wrote:

Or should be session[:user] = nil
Is that the same?

No, Sandy was in error.

Marmen was correct. The missing ] belonged where he showed it. Sorry
about any confusion.

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