Remove array bracket

Hi when i run my script, the output is as followed:

[{“name”=>“Efficiency (Energy)”,
“type”=>“Objective”,
“subtype”=>“NIZAMMMMzz”,
“components”=>
[{“type”=>“ContentBox”, “title”=>“Audit”,
“args”=>{:content=>“None\n”}},
{“type”=>“ChildListingComponent”,
“title”=>“Current Targets for the Efficiency (Energy)
Objective:”}]},
{“children”=>
[{“name”=>“Routinely monitor energy use”,
“type”=>“Target”,
“subtype”=>“ATEEN”,
“components”=>
[{“type”=>“ContentBox”,
“title”=>“Summary”,
“args”=>{:content=>“None\n”}},
{“type”=>“ContentBox”, “title”=>“Description”,
“args”=>{:content=>""}},
{“type”=>“TargetComponent”,
“title”=>“None”,
“args”=>
{:start_date=>"#<Date: 2010-08-10 ",
:end_date=>“5/1/2011”,
:state=>“Active”}}]}]},


:state=>“Active”}}]}]}]

How do i tell ruby to remove the very first and the very last bracket
‘[…]’ out from my output?

Nizam

Are these output to a txt file, or irb? Mind sharing your output
formatting code?

On 02/01/2011 06:50 PM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

Objective:"}]},
{“type”=>“TargetComponent”,
‘[…]’ out from my output?
How does your script produce that output in the first place? I’m going
to assume that you have a reference to an array and that you’re printing
the output of that array’s inspect method. In that case, you could try
something like this:

array = … # Array value from somewhere
puts array.map(&:inspect).join(", ")

This code maps each element of the array to the value of its associated
inspect method and then joins all elements of the array with ", ". You
should be able to use similar logic if you are using something other
than the inspect method as well.

-Jeremy

Hi guys,

Actually i just want to remove the bracket (The very first and last
bracket) because if the bracket still there, it will affect the
indentation on my yaml output (as the posted output above will be
converted into yaml format). This is what will happen on my yaml output
if i do not remove the brackets:

    • name: Efficiency (Energy)
      type: Objective
      subtype: NIZAMMMMzz
      components:
      - type: ContentBox
      title: Audit
      args:
      :content: |
      None

      - type: ChildListingComponent
        title: "Current Targets for the Efficiency (Energy) 
      

Objective:"
- children:
- name: Routinely monitor energy use
type: Target
subtype: ATEEN
components:
- type: ContentBox
title: Summary
args:
:content: |
None

As you can see, there are double indented dash (- -) on the Efficiency
(energy) and i want to remove one of those.This is the code i use:

tar = [ ]
objective = {"name"=>"#{blank}",
       "type"=>"Objective",
       "subtype"=>"NIZAMMMMzz",
       "components"=>
        [{"type"=>"ContentBox",
          "title"=>"Audit",
          "args"=>{:content=>"None\n"}},
         {"type"=>"ChildListingComponent",
          "title"=>"Current Targets for the #{blank} Objective:"}]}
 tar << objective

 mon = { "children"=>
  [{"name"=>"#{question}",
          "type"=>"Target",
          "subtype"=>"ATEEN",
          "components"=>
           [{"type"=>"ContentBox",
             "title"=>"Summary",
             "args"=>{:content=>"None\n"}},
            {"type"=>"ContentBox",
             "title"=>"Description",
             "args"=>
              {:content=>
                ""}},
            {"type"=>"TargetComponent",
             "title"=>"None",
             "args"=>
              {:start_date=>"#<Date: 2010-08-10 ",
               :end_date=>"#{due_date}",
               :state=>"#{status}"}}]}]}
 tar << mon
 pp tar

Nizam

class EnergyManagement < Environmental
def initialize(title)
@title = title
end
def objective
convert_yaml = Environmental.yaml #YAML::load_file(‘nizam.yaml’)
convert_yaml[“System”][“Environmental”][“children”][2][“children”]
<< @title
File.open(“nizam_out.yaml”, “w”){|f| YAML.dump(convert_yaml, f)}
end
end

e = EnergyManagement.new(tar)
e.objective

On 02/01/2011 09:04 PM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

end

e = EnergyManagement.new(tar)
e.objective

At this point I can’t see where the problem is since none of this
correlates in an obvious way with your earlier posts. I think you need
to simplify this whole thing into a basic test case using a stripped
down and much simplified YAML file that reproduces the core problem.
That way those of us here can try out your code, see exactly what you
see, and ask you more intelligent question. :slight_smile:

-Jeremy

On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 4:04 AM, Kamarulnizam R.
[email protected] wrote:

class EnergyManagement < Environmental

What does the Environmental class look like?

And what does the input YAML look like?


Phillip G.

Though the folk I have met,
(Ah, how soon!) they forget
When I’ve moved on to some other place,
There may be one or two,
When I’ve played and passed through,
Who’ll remember my song or my face.

class Environmental
@@convert_yaml = nil
def self.yaml
if @@convert_yaml.nil? then
@@convert_yaml = YAML::load_file(‘nizam.yaml’)
end
@@convert_yaml
end
end


  - name: Optimisation
    type: Objective
    subtype: None
    components:
    - type: ContentBox
      title: Optimisation
      args:
        :content: |
          None

    - type: ChildListingComponent
      title: "Current Targets for the Optimisation Objective:"

  - - name: Efficiency (Energy)
      type: Objective
      subtype: NIZAMMMzzz
      components:
      - type: ContentBox
        title: Team
        args:
          :content: |
            None

the input of my yaml file is similar as data within the dashed line. The
thing is, by eliminating the brackets as i mentioned earlier will
eliminate the double dashes (- - name: Efficiency (Energy)), hence
corrected the indentation on my yaml output file. I just dnt know how to
eliminate that bracket since i added two hashes (‘objective’ and ‘mon’)
into an array (‘tar’). Is there any other way i can add those two hashes
without inserting it into an array? My desire yaml output file is like
this:

  - name: Optimisation
    type: Objective
    subtype: None
    components:
    - type: ContentBox
      title: Optimisation
      args:
        :content: |
          None

    - type: ChildListingComponent
      title: "Current Targets for the Optimisation Objective:"

  - name: Efficiency (Energy)
    type: Objective
    subtype: NIZAMMMzzz
    components:
    - type: ContentBox
      title: Team
      args:
        :content: |
          None

Thanks

Nizam

On 02/01/2011 08:22 PM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

      subtype: NIZAMMMMzz
    - children:

As you can see, there are double indented dash (- -) on the Efficiency
{“type”=>“ChildListingComponent”,
“args”=>{:content=>“None\n”}},
:state=>"#{status}"}}]}]}
tar << mon
pp tar

The variable tar is an array of hashes, and the first output you posted
agrees with this. At this point there does not appear to be any cause
for an added array wrapping tar. You need to show us how you output the
value of tar into your YAML file. You are likely wrapping tar within
another array before you do that.

-Jeremy

Thanks Jeremy,

I am able to solve the problem regarding indentation by changing the
code as posted. There is one little question i want to ask.

How do convert these two hashes:

[{xxxxxx},{yyyyyy}]

to be like this:

[{xxxxxx, yyyyyy}]

Is it possible at all?

Regarding the Environmental class. I still need that class because i
want to open my yaml file to be used by many subclasses, not just
EnergyManagement only. Thanks

Nizam

Btw there is a catch, {yyyyyy} hash is created based on a looping method
(CSV.foreach) and i dont think using common inject, collect or merge
method is the right choice. I tried it, and it didnt work

Nizam

On 02/01/2011 10:33 PM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

class Environmental
@@convert_yaml = nil
def self.yaml
if @@convert_yaml.nil? then
@@convert_yaml = YAML::load_file(‘nizam.yaml’)
end
@@convert_yaml
end
end

Given the way you used this class within the EnergyManagement class,
there is no need to make EnergyManagement inherit from Environmental.
Just FYI.

          :content: |
            None

the input of my yaml file is similar as data within the dashed line. The
thing is, by eliminating the brackets as i mentioned earlier will
eliminate the double dashes (- - name: Efficiency (Energy)), hence
corrected the indentation on my yaml output file. I just dnt know how to
eliminate that bracket since i added two hashes (‘objective’ and ‘mon’)
into an array (‘tar’).

Let’s fix some terminology here just to prevent potential confusion.
You don’t want to eliminate brackets. You want to extract these items
from the array in which they are embedded. “Eliminating brackets” is
something you would do directly to the string output generated by
something like the inspect method. The apparent extra array is the root
of the problem rather than the brackets shown when you inspect it. :wink:

      args:
    - type: ContentBox
      title: Team
      args:
        :content: |
          None

OK. It’s really hard to be sure here, but I think the problem is that
you need to convert this section of your code:

convert_yaml[“System”][“Environmental”][“children”][2][“children”]
<< @title

To this:

convert_yaml[“System”][“Environmental”][“children”][2][“children”] +=
@title

The issue is that tar is an array of hashes, but it appears that you
actually want to append the contents of tar to the data structure you
have from the YAML file instead of appending tar itself. This code
appends the contents of the array in tar to the existing array in that
mess of hashes.

There are other ways to handle this, but this one is the simplest
change. The downside is that you would prevent someone actually
appending tar as-is if they actually wanted to do so. Maybe that’s not
an issue for this code.

-Jeremy

On 2/2/2011 1:53 AM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

[{xxxxxx, yyyyyy}]

Is it possible at all?

Check out Hash#merge. Assuming you have an array of hashes in the
variable arr, you could merge them all like this:

arr.inject({}, &:merge)

Give that a try in irb and see if you can fit it into your code.

Regarding the Environmental class. I still need that class because i
want to open my yaml file to be used by many subclasses, not just
EnergyManagement only. Thanks

I’m not saying that you don’t need the Environmental class at all. You
just don’t need to make the EnergyManagement class inherit from it in
order to use it the way you are in the code. Calling Environmental.yaml
will still work.

-Jeremy

On 02/02/2011 02:52 AM, Robert K. wrote:

Another remark: I don’t understand why indentation in a YAML file is
such an issue. After all it’s a data format and readable either way.
Typically too few indentation is more an issue than too much. If the
formatting is that crucial it might be worthwhile to look into writing
a new YAML formatter.

I think there is confusion here because of the way Nizam phrased the
questions. The indentation is symptomatic of having too much array
nesting for the intended data structure. The formatting itself wasn’t
the problem.

-Jeremy

On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 6:52 AM, Jeremy B. [email protected] wrote:

OK. It’s really hard to be sure here, but I think the problem is that
you need to convert this section of your code:

convert_yaml[“System”][“Environmental”][“children”][2][“children”]
<< @title

To this:

convert_yaml[“System”][“Environmental”][“children”][2][“children”] += @title

I’d rather

convert_yaml[“System”][“Environmental”][“children”][2][“children”].concat(@title)

The issue is that tar is an array of hashes, but it appears that you
actually want to append the contents of tar to the data structure you
have from the YAML file instead of appending tar itself. This code
appends the contents of the array in tar to the existing array in that
mess of hashes.

There are other ways to handle this, but this one is the simplest
change. The downside is that you would prevent someone actually
appending tar as-is if they actually wanted to do so. Maybe that’s not
an issue for this code.

Another remark: I don’t understand why indentation in a YAML file is
such an issue. After all it’s a data format and readable either way.
Typically too few indentation is more an issue than too much. If the
formatting is that crucial it might be worthwhile to look into writing
a new YAML formatter.

Cheers

robert

Hi Jeremy,

I have already solved the problem by myself by manipulating bit of the
hash content. Its quite easy though. Maybe i think of the wrong way
before this. If you are still interested, i can show you how i done it.
Cheers

Nizam

On 2/2/2011 3:53 PM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

Hi Jeremy,

I have already solved the problem by myself by manipulating bit of the
hash content. Its quite easy though. Maybe i think of the wrong way
before this. If you are still interested, i can show you how i done it.

What’s important is that you fixed your problem and that you understand
how you did it. If you have more questions, please post them though.

-Jeremy

On 2/2/2011 1:59 AM, Kamarulnizam R. wrote:

Btw there is a catch, {yyyyyy} hash is created based on a looping method
(CSV.foreach) and i dont think using common inject, collect or merge
method is the right choice. I tried it, and it didnt work

I’m not sure what you’re saying here. If you’re saying you need some
custom merge logic that takes into account your data structures, you’re
going to have to provide some examples that demonstrate the issue.

Please try to keep the examples as succinct as possible. Your real data
is quite complex, and trying to make sense of it in this forum is a real
challenge.

-Jeremy

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