Refactoring IDE for Ruby?

Hi,

I need to do some refactoring of my Ryby code.
Where can I find a ide with refactoring features ?

Running. Mac Os X

Best R.
W.

No refactoring IDEs for Ruby that I know of.

On OS X, I use TextMate… an awesome editor… It has a lot of Ruby
constructs built in.

There’s also RadRails http://www.radrails.org/ It’s editor isn’t as
nice as TextMate (although it does have better emacs key bindings) but
it’s got better rails integration.

My 2 cents.

Thanks,

David

Mat S. wrote:

RadRails also (by virtue of Eclipse) has really amazing version
control. And there’s even a (commercial) plugin that makes the editor
operate a lot like vim :slight_smile:
Speaking of vim … vim 7.0 introduced a “feature” where something,
presumably of interest to someone, is displayed in the leftmost two
columns by default. I haven’t been able to figure out what it’s called
or how to turn it off. It’s really annoying to me … a combination of
not knowing what it is or how to turn it off, losing two columns of
terminal width, and having it propagate when I do a copy and paste into
an email. Does anyone on this list know how to get rid of it?

On Aug 3, 2006, at 10:32 AM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

two columns of terminal width, and having it propagate when I do a
copy and paste into an email. Does anyone on this list know how to
get rid of it?

I’m running vim 7, I do not see this extra information in the
leftmost two columns. What do you see there?

On Aug 3, 2006, at 9:01 AM, David P. wrote:

No refactoring IDEs for Ruby that I know of.

On OS X, I use TextMate… an awesome editor… It has a lot of Ruby
constructs built in.

There’s also RadRails http://www.radrails.org/ It’s editor isn’t as
nice as TextMate (although it does have better emacs key bindings) but
it’s got better rails integration.

RadRails also (by virtue of Eclipse) has really amazing version
control. And there’s even a (commercial) plugin that makes the
editor operate a lot like vim :slight_smile:
-Mat

On Aug 3, 2006, at 10:57 AM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

something, presumably of interest to someone, is displayed in the
I’m running vim 7, I do not see this extra information in the
leftmost two columns. What do you see there?

'>def my-first-ruby-program
puts “What’s that junk in the left two columns?”
0>end
~
[snip]

It almost looks like fold indicators

What happends if you do :set foldcolumn=0

Logan C. wrote:

columns by default. I haven’t been able to figure out what it’s
two columns. What do you see there?
'>def my-first-ruby-program
puts “What’s that junk in the left two columns?”
0>end

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

~

“ruby-test.rb” [converted] 3L, 81C
3,1 All

Chad P. wrote:

and I’m having a tough time finding something relevant in the Vim
documentation on this computer, so I’m not getting very far in
attempting to figure out what’s going on. Perhaps we could be of more
help if we saw the /etc/vim/vimrc, /usr/share/vim/vimrc, and
of course ~/.vimrc files. Erm. Assuming this is on Linux. What’s the
operating system? I suppose I should have asked that first.

Gentoo Linux and CygWin are both doing it. I haven’t tried the Windows
one and I don’t have access to a Mac. I think I’m going to try the Vim
web site and see if they have a mailing list.

It has something to do with syntax coloring and may only happen with
some languages. When I first open a file, it’s not there, but a few
seconds into the edit, the colors and the two mysterious columns appear.
IIRC it happens with Ruby and Perl, but not with R. And when I turn
“:syn off” it doesn’t go away.

Anyhow, I was hoping someone else here at least knew what it was called.
I promised myself I’d learn “emacs” some day anyhow … :slight_smile:

On 8/4/06, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky [email protected] wrote:

Gentoo Linux and CygWin are both doing it. I haven’t tried the Windows
one and I don’t have access to a Mac. I think I’m going to try the Vim
web site and see if they have a mailing list.

It has something to do with syntax coloring and may only happen with
some languages. When I first open a file, it’s not there, but a few
seconds into the edit, the colors and the two mysterious columns appear.
IIRC it happens with Ruby and Perl, but not with R. And when I turn
“:syn off” it doesn’t go away.

Try creating a new user with a minimal vimrc and see if it goes away?
I run vim7 under gentoo with zero problems (I’m using the vim-ruby gem
for the ruby-specific stuff and matchit.vim). Here’s my vimrc:

set nocompatible
syntax on
filetype on
filetype indent on
filetype plugin on
set sw=2
set ignorecase
set smartcase
set showmatch
set incsearch

martin

On Fri, Aug 04, 2006 at 12:23:07AM +0900, Logan C. wrote:

On Aug 3, 2006, at 10:57 AM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

Logan C. wrote:

I’m running vim 7, I do not see this extra information in the
leftmost two columns. What do you see there?

Ditto – I’m using 7, and I don’t see anything like that.

'>def my-first-ruby-program
puts “What’s that junk in the left two columns?”
0>end
~
[snip]

It almost looks like fold indicators

I really don’t think that’s what it is. I’ve seen it somewhere before,
but I’m drawing a blank right now. Regardless, it seems that there’s a
nondefault setting that the rest of us don’t have. Perhaps it has
something to do with the way Vim was installed in this case, if it
hasn’t been set explicitly – or perhaps there have been some
configuration changes made via an example .vimrc found on the web, or
something like that. I can only guess.

What happends if you do :set foldcolumn=0

Simply entering
:set foldcolumn
should tell you what is currently set for the foldcolumn option.

Unfortunately, Google won’t let me search for the greater than symbol,
and I’m having a tough time finding something relevant in the Vim
documentation on this computer, so I’m not getting very far in
attempting to figure out what’s going on. Perhaps we could be of more
help if we saw the /etc/vim/vimrc, /usr/share/vim/vimrc, and
of course ~/.vimrc files. Erm. Assuming this is on Linux. What’s the
operating system? I suppose I should have asked that first.

Hi Ed,

On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 13:29:29 +0900, Martin DeMello wrote:

“:syn off” it doesn’t go away.
set sw=2
set ignorecase
set smartcase
set showmatch
set incsearch

martin

I think it may be ‘signs’?
:h signs

Squeak S. wrote:

I need to do some refactoring of my Ryby code.
Where can I find a ide with refactoring features ?
Emacs with Ruby Refactoring Browser
(http://rubyforge.org/projects/rrb/).

Regards,
Jan

On Fri, Aug 04, 2006 at 12:26:24PM +0900, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

Gentoo Linux and CygWin are both doing it. I haven’t tried the Windows
one and I don’t have access to a Mac. I think I’m going to try the Vim
web site and see if they have a mailing list.

How did you install it? Did you use emerge on Gentoo? Did you compile
from tarball for Cygwin? As I mentioned, I’m using Debian
(Etch/Testing, specifically), and though I have the same version number
I’m not having the same problem. Then again, I haven’t tried it with
syntax highlighting.

It has something to do with syntax coloring and may only happen with
some languages. When I first open a file, it’s not there, but a few
seconds into the edit, the colors and the two mysterious columns appear.
IIRC it happens with Ruby and Perl, but not with R. And when I turn
“:syn off” it doesn’t go away.

It sounds like there’s something going on with your syntax highlighting
configuration.

Have you tried opening an R file while it’s already open in a Ruby or
Perl file, or vice-versa, to check behavior?

Mark W. wrote:

set nocompatible

martin

I think it may be ‘signs’?
:h signs

Yep … it is/was signs. SInce I don’t have a .vimrc, the Vim list folks
think it’s part of one of the plugins. It is documented in “:help sign”
and it can be disabled with “:sign unplace *”.

Hello Jan,

JF> Squeak S. wrote:

I need to do some refactoring of my Ryby code.
Where can I find a ide with refactoring features ?
JF> Emacs with Ruby Refactoring Browser
JF> (http://rubyforge.org/projects/rrb/).

Unfortunately the Ruby Refactoring Brower is not worth the time trying
to download and install it.

The truth is that there isn’t any automated Refactoring Tool for Ruby.

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