Re: splitting string to hash

s2- “[1] Hello [2] bye [2:1] continue [2] more”
Should that be “[2:2] more” ?

I want to convert them to hashes like
h1- {1 => “Hello”, 2 => “bye”}

arr = s1.split(/\s*?[(.?)]\s/)
arr.delete("")

h1 = Hash[*arr]

I’m not actually sure why I get an empty string from the Array#split
call. If someone can figure that out, you can get rid of the
Array#delete call.

Regards,

Dan

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No, that was actually correct, the second one is [2] not [2:2]. The key
would need to be 2:2 though otherwise it could possibly override another
key.
Thanks for the other one!

Berger, Daniel wrote:

s2- “[1] Hello [2] bye [2:1] continue [2] more”
Should that be “[2:2] more” ?

I want to convert them to hashes like
h1- {1 => “Hello”, 2 => “bye”}

arr = s1.split(/\s*?[(.?)]\s/)
arr.delete("")

h1 = Hash[*arr]

I’m not actually sure why I get an empty string from the Array#split
call. If someone can figure that out, you can get rid of the
Array#delete call.

Regards,

Dan

On 8/31/06, Berger, Daniel [email protected] wrote:

s2- “[1] Hello [2] bye [2:1] continue [2] more”

I’m not actually sure why I get an empty string from the Array#split
call. If someone can figure that out, you can get rid of the
Array#delete call.

If you’re capturing a group in your split pattern, and your pattern
matches the beginning of the string, you’ll get the leading null field
in your array. By default, a trailing null field is suppressed; you
can get at it by setting the optional limit param to -1.

irb(main):001:0> “1234”.split(/(\d)/)
=> ["", “1”, “”, “2”, “”, “3”, “”, “4”]
irb(main):002:0> “1234”.split(/(\d)/, -1)
=> ["", “1”, “”, “2”, “”, “3”, “”, “4”, “”]

-Alex