Re: ruby and ralis failed

I had just found out that ruby and rails failed me as a programmer,
becaused they are all zipped up. this has led me to belived that the
book will not showed you how to unzipped them.

James N. wrote:

I had just found out that ruby and rails failed me as a programmer,
becaused they are all zipped up. this has led me to belived that the
book will not showed you how to unzipped them.

That’s not Ruby or Rails failing you. Unzipping files is a basic skill.
You should already have an unzip program included with your OS; if not,
there are many free ones available.

Best,
–Â
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 9:39 PM, James N.
[email protected]wrote:

I had just found out that ruby and rails failed me as a programmer,
becaused they are all zipped up. this has led me to belived that the book
will not showed you how to unzipped them.

This sounds like an issue with the book rather than the language and
framework.

Unzipping files is quite common, though, surely there are instructions
you
can find ( with a search engine ) which explain how to unzip the files.
More
specifically, perhaps you should look into how to install ruby on your
operating system. As far as installing Rails,
http://gemcutter.org/gems/rails implies that you can use rubygems to
install
it by simply going to the command line and typing “gem install rails” or
“sudo gem install rails” , depending on your operating system and
privileges.

However, if unzipping files is a major barrier for you, then trying to
learn
Rails may be biting off more than you can chew. I would advise starting
with
something that does not have such a steep learning curve. In particular,
I
am impressed with how simple Sinatra is to get up and running (
http://www.sinatrarb.com/). You can see in this screenshot (
http://i48.tinypic.com/6jowht.png) that with very few steps, you can get
a
Sinatra application up and running. This would probably be a wiser more
fruitful place to start. I don’t think there are any books specifically
for
Sinatra, but there is a nice screencast by Peepcode that you can pick up
for
$9 (http://peepcode.com/products/sinatra). Looking at this, I think I
would
have had a much easier time learning Rails if I had started here, many
of
the concepts and things that it will teach you will segue right into
Rails.

In other words, if this is giving you trouble, then your goals may not
be
immediately accessible, and it may be wise to get your feet wet before
jumping into the deep end.
-Josh

it just do not work and Iam not happy with it.

— On Mon, 2/1/10, Josh C. [email protected] wrote:

From: Josh C. [email protected]
Subject: Re: ruby and ralis failed
To: “ruby-talk ML” [email protected]
Date: Monday, February 1, 2010, 9:11 PM

On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 9:39 PM, James N.
[email protected]wrote:

I had just found out that ruby and rails failed me as a programmer,
becaused they are all zipped up. this has led me to belived that the book
will not showed you how to unzipped them.

This sounds like an issue with the book rather than the language and
framework.

Unzipping files is quite common, though, surely there are instructions
you
can find ( with a search engine ) which explain how to unzip the files.
More
specifically, perhaps you should look into how to install ruby on your
operating system. As far as installing Rails,
http://gemcutter.org/gems/rails implies that you can use rubygems to
install
it by simply going to the command line and typing “gem install rails” or
“sudo gem install rails” , depending on your operating system and
privileges.

However, if unzipping files is a major barrier for you, then trying to
learn
Rails may be biting off more than you can chew. I would advise starting
with
something that does not have such a steep learning curve. In particular,
I
am impressed with how simple Sinatra is to get up and running (
http://www.sinatrarb.com/). You can see in this screenshot (
http://i48.tinypic.com/6jowht.png) that with very few steps, you can get
a
Sinatra application up and running. This would probably be a wiser more
fruitful place to start. I don’t think there are any books specifically
for
Sinatra, but there is a nice screencast by Peepcode that you can pick up
for
$9 (http://peepcode.com/products/sinatra). Looking at this, I think I
would
have had a much easier time learning Rails if I had started here, many
of
the concepts and things that it will teach you will segue right into
Rails.

In other words, if this is giving you trouble, then your goals may not
be
immediately accessible, and it may be wise to get your feet wet before
jumping into the deep end.
-Josh

On Wed, Feb 3, 2010 at 4:29 PM, James N.
[email protected]wrote:

it just do not work and Iam not happy with it.

Have you tried the steps listed at
http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/downloads/ ?

James N. wrote:

I am impressed with how simple Sinatra is to get up and running
(http://www.sinatrarb.com/). You can see in this screenshot
(http://i48.tinypic.com/6jowht.png)

What is this character you have to the left of the prompt? Looks like
the communists’ scythe and hammer.

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 3:53 PM, Albert S.
[email protected]wrote:

It’s a hammer and sickle. At my work, use (or were using) a unicode
character for our avatars in text files, to quickly identify things like
who
left a comment, or who some line is aimed at. Wikipedia agrees with you,
it
is a symbol for Communism http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammer_and_sickle
My
boss picked it for me, because I have a very low opinion of Capitalism.
I
won’t depict my reasoning, because I’d rather not digress this thread in
to
politics. I also added it to my prompt when I was figuring out how to
personalize my environment (when in a git branch, it will also list the
branch, and there are a few other things I’ve added, like cd will
automatically list the contents of the new directory).

If you’re interested,
The character: ☭
Some docs: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/262d/index.htm

Josh C. wrote:

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 3:53 PM, Albert S.
[email protected]wrote:

It’s a hammer and sickle. At my work, use (or were using) a unicode
character for our avatars in text files, to quickly identify things like
who
left a comment, or who some line is aimed at.

Yuck! Don’t you use version control?

Best,
–Â
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Josh C. wrote:

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 8:23 PM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected]wrote:

Yuck! Don’t you use version control?

Git is version control.

Sure is; I didn’t know if you were using it.

My point was this: the avatars are cute, but if you’re using version
control, then signing comments is a waste of effort because you can
always use “git blame” (or equivalent commands in other VCSs) to figure
out who wrote what. Don’t duplicate what your tools already do
automatically.

Best,
–Â
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 8:23 PM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected]wrote:

Yuck! Don’t you use version control?

Git is version control.

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