Re: new 802.11b receiver

Quoting George N. [email protected]:

USRP2 uses gigabit ethernet

  • George

Yes, new USRP will support Gigabit Ethernet, but most computers don’t
support that. You have to buy an extra card or buscard for your
desktop or laptop.


hamed

On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 7:17 PM, Mohammad Hamed F.
[email protected] wrote:

Yes, new USRP will support Gigabit Ethernet, but most computers don’t
support that. You have to buy an extra card or buscard for your
desktop or laptop.

Just about anything bought in the last few years should have gige. …
Keep in mind that you’re not going to be able to keep up with the
100+MByte/sec USRP2 sample firehose on a computer that is five years
old.

All else fails you can usually buy a cheap gig-e nic for just a few
dollars and a good one for perhaps $20 or so.

Gregory M. wrote:

100+MByte/sec USRP2 sample firehose on a computer that is five years

I know my four year old ASUS motherboard does and so does everything
purchased after including my laptops.

Bob


AMSAT Director and VP Engineering. Member: ARRL, AMSAT-DL,
TAPR, Packrats, NJQRP, QRP ARCI, QCWA, FRC. ARRL SDR WG Chair
“Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by
definition, not smart enough to debug it.” - Brian W. Kernighan

available? What causing the USRP2 can overcome the USB limitation … ?

USRP2 uses gigabit ethernet

Yes, new USRP will support Gigabit Ethernet, but most computers don’t
support that. You have to buy an extra card or buscard for your
desktop or laptop.

Most applications of the USRP2 won’t require the full bandwidth of the
GigE interface, just as most applications of USRP1 don’t absolutely
max out the USB bus. The USRP2 will also have a lot more processing
power next to the digitizers, so it can do the very highest bandwidth
calculation on-board, and only communicate lower bandwidth processed
signals with the host.

Most GigE implementations (and perhaps all certified ones) fall back
to 100 Mbit/sec or 10 Mbit/sec if plugged into a lower speed device.
Since the GigE in the USRP2 is implemented in free “software” in the
FPGA, that fallback code may be “unimplemented”, at least in the
beginning. Then again, 100 Mbit/sec may be the first Ethernet
implementation that works!

Whether or not low speed fallback is implemented, you should be able to
trivially interface a USRP2 to a lower speed Ethernet (e.g. on a
laptop) by plugging both into a $50 GigE switch, which will do the
rate adaptation for you.

This flexibility is just a piece of the power that comes from USRP2’s
use of standardized Ethernet (and possibly IP) networking.

John

On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 1:36 PM, John G. [email protected] wrote:


This flexibility is just a piece of the power that comes from USRP2’s
use of standardized Ethernet (and possibly IP) networking.

Speaking of power, did PoE make it onto the board?

Brian

Brian P. wrote:

On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 1:36 PM, John G. [email protected] wrote:


This flexibility is just a piece of the power that comes from USRP2’s
use of standardized Ethernet (and possibly IP) networking.

Speaking of power, did PoE make it onto the board?

100 mbps ethernet – works, but very little testing done on it. 10 mbps
ethernet probably works too, but no testing has been done.

PoE is not in there at this time. It was a question of development
time, not of going over the PoE power limits.

Matt

On Wed, 2 Apr 2008, Matt E. wrote:

100 mbps ethernet – works, but very little testing done on it. 10
mbps ethernet probably works too, but no testing has been done.

PoE is not in there at this time. It was a question of development
time, not of going over the PoE power limits.

I imagine it would be pretty easy to get a separate PoE box (eg
http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=0&pid=332) and sitting that in front
if you need it anyway (you might need another regulation stage unless
the regulator on the USRP2 will take 12V.

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