Re: Microsoft Timestamp (Active Directory)

its in this format:
128002727440808261

How do I convert this to something more…nice???

Leave it to Microsoft to come up with something this convoluted:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/topics/win2003/lastlogon.m
spx

This seems to work:

require ‘date’

last_logon = 128002727440808261

base = Date.new(1601, 1, 1)
base += last_logon / (60 * 10000000 * 1440)

p base.to_s # “2006-08-17”

Regards,

Dan

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Amazing…

Thanks a bunch

Mikkel
On Friday, August 18, 2006, at 3:03 AM, Berger, Daniel wrote:

its in this format:

Dan

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Mikkel B.

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Berger, Daniel wrote:

Leave it to Microsoft to come up with something this convoluted:

What could possibly be less convoluted than keeping time as a
high resolution (in this case, 100ns) integer since some epoch?
It’s actually the perfect way to handle time, and I thought
that (and implemented it) long before I knew MS had done it.

On 8/18/06, Clifford H. [email protected] wrote:

Berger, Daniel wrote:

Leave it to Microsoft to come up with something this convoluted:

What could possibly be less convoluted than keeping time as a
high resolution (in this case, 100ns) integer since some epoch?
It’s actually the perfect way to handle time, and I thought
that (and implemented it) long before I knew MS had done it.

Check the NTP protocol. This sounds like the format used by NTP servers.

Daniel M. wrote:

“Berger, Daniel” [email protected] writes:

Leave it to Microsoft to come up with something this convoluted:

At least their time 0 is close to the beginning of a century

Actually it’s at the beginning of a century.

Hal

How did you get the lastlogontimestamp attribute into integer format?

Retrieving myuser.lastLogonTimestamp always gives me:

#WIN32OLE:0x6e39ee0

Which I have no idea how to deal with.

Thanks,

Charles L.

For just documentation purposes - here is some dirty sample code on how
to get a Ruby DateTime from Active Directory:

require ‘win32ole’
require ‘date’

AD4Ruby

require ‘./ad4r/config.rb’

Import namespace for AD4R

include ActiveDirectory

myuser = User.find_by_logon(‘cll13291’)

highpart = myuser.ldap_object.send(“Get”, “lastLogon” ).HighPart
lowpart = myuser.ldap_object.send(“Get”, “lastLogon” ).LowPart

puts "HighPart: " + highpart.to_s
puts "LowPart: " + lowpart.to_s
intLogonTime = highpart * (2**32) + lowpart
puts intLogonTime
intLogonFloat = intLogonTime.to_f / (60 * 10000000 * 1440).to_f
puts “%.9f” % intLogonFloat

last_logon = intLogonFloat

base = DateTime.new(1601,1,1,0,0,0)
base += intLogonFloat

p base
p base.to_s # “2006-08-17T12:37:10Z”

“Berger, Daniel” [email protected] writes:

Leave it to Microsoft to come up with something this convoluted:

At least their time 0 is close to the beginning of a century, the
beginning of a year, and the beginning of the week. (if you begin
weeks on a Monday) They could have chosen to fill their 64-bit time
value with 100ns offsets from 00:00 17-NOV-1858, which isn’t even at
the beginning of anybody’s week. (It’s a Wednesday)

Microsoft even seems to have gone with a pre-existing external
standard in this case.

Parenthetical note:

The date in 1858 is VMS’s time zero - in this case it was also a
pre-existing standard that was followed, based on what astronomers
using computers to track Sputnik used for their time values - see
http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/docs/calendar_time_y2k_etc.html#nov-17-1858

See also the bottom of rfc868:
http://www.cse.ohio-state.edu/cgi-bin/rfc/rfc868.html

I want to know what systems had time clocks starting 1 Jan 1976; I
assume the 1 May 1983 date is related to the publication date of the
RFC.

I found the following code a bit clearer, but YMMV; this was running
under Linux & just grabbing lastLogin via LDAP.

HTH,

-b

constants for converting to/from AD’s wacky time format

#http://www.irishdev.com/blogs/jbrennan/archive/2005/09/02/973.aspx

was helpful in figuring this out

AD_EPOCH = 116_444_736_000_000_000
AD_MULTIPLIER = 10_000_000

convert a Time object to AD’s epoch

def time2ad(time)
(time.to_i * AD_MULTIPLIER) + AD_EPOCH
end

convert from AD’s time string to a Time object

def ad2time(time)
Time.at((time.to_i - AD_EPOCH) / AD_MULTIPLIER)
end

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