Re: Hash order bug?

=> false}
Now, i delete the foo function from the code (the foo

Hashes are unordered. If you need an ordered collection,
you’ll need
to use an array.

David

Oh my god, i didn’t know it, sorry. Is that a missing feature?

No, it’s just the way hashes behave. Note that there are ordered hash
implementations on the RAA:

http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/orderedhash/

You can also use a Struct to get roughly the same effect.

Regards,

Dan

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Berger, Daniel wrote:

No, it’s just the way hashes behave. Note that there are ordered hash
implementations on the RAA:

http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/orderedhash/

You can also use a Struct to get roughly the same effect.

In case anyone tries to refer me to these, I’ll point out that
there are three reasons I like a hash.

  1. It indexes on an arbitrary value, not on an integer like
    an array.
  2. It consists of explicit pairings of key and value.
  3. There is a convenient sybtax for literals:
    {a=>b, c=>d, e=>f}

Note that there are no ordered hash solutions that preserve
the third criterion.

Most would require me to do something like:

oh = OrdHash.new(a,b, c,d, e,f)

or

oh = OrdHash.new([a,b], [c,d], [e,f])

or something just as bad.

Don’t underestimate the importance of a convenient notation!
What if arrays in Ruby were like arrays in C? In C, you can
specify an array literal (barely) when you declare it; that’s
about it.

Hal

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