Rake Friday?


#1

Is there a Friday,

http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/fridays.html

on Rake in the works?

I want one.

Later,


#2

On Feb 11, 2006, at 7:03 PM, Bil K. wrote:

Is there a Friday,

http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/fridays.html

on Rake in the works?

I want one.

That is a great idea. :slight_smile:

James Edward G. II


#3

On Sun, Feb 12, 2006 at 10:12:38AM +0900, James Edward G. II wrote:

That is a great idea. :slight_smile:
Yes. Please. But don’t let that get in the way, Jim, of you writing a
Friday
on DSLs :wink:

marcel


#4

On 2/11/06, Marcel Molina Jr. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

That is a great idea. :slight_smile:

Yes. Please. But don’t let that get in the way, Jim, of you writing a Friday
on DSLs :wink:

I’ll take one of each.


#5

Hi All

I’ve been programming for more years than I care to remember and am
enjoying programming in Ruby (especially on Rails). So far I’ve found
nothing “new” (to me) in Ruby, with the exception of the lisp-like
features and that’s something I’d really like to explore.
Unfortunately, unless I’ve overlooked it, neither the pick-axe book
nor “the ruby way” seem to cover this. I’m particularly interested
in which common problems these features let me solve in a more
elegant and concise way than using regular structured/oo approaches.

Anyone able to point me to a resource please?

Edward


#6

Edward K. wrote:

Hi All

I’ve been programming for more years than I care to remember and am
enjoying programming in Ruby (especially on Rails). So far I’ve found
nothing “new” (to me) in Ruby, with the exception of the lisp-like
features and that’s something I’d really like to explore.

Could you explain what you mean by “lisp-like features”?

Also, you may want to search the list archives for “lisp”, as there have
been a number of threads related to it.


James B.

“Blanket statements are over-rated”


#7

How about a double whammy? A book on DSL design using Rake as the
example basis.

Learn DSL design and Rake in one fell swoop!


#8

DÅ?a Nedeľa 12 Február 2006 18:38 Edward K. napísal:

Anyone able to point me to a resource please?

Edward

Well, Ruby is a strongly derivative language, there’s not THAT much in
terms
of new and exciting features around. It’s more about picking out which
you
think are nifty and which not.

As for the lisp-like operations, I’d say the blocks as lexical closures
are a
notable one. Not very often used as such, but they are somewhat useful
when
you want to develop your own control structures, As Seen In Smalltalk
™.

I’d also put collection mapping / filtering using blocks as one. Which
pretty
much reduces the messy nested loops that you end up with when trying to
do
this in lessay Java into in my opinion much neater method chains. And
then
there’s also Enumerable#inject, the swiss knife of collection
operations,
which lets you do pretty much everything. Cf. my favourite #inject
example, a
very cryptic O(n)n factorial:

class Integer
	def factorial
		(1..self).inject(1){|m, n| m * n}
	end
end

I also think strongtyping.rb lets you do something along the lines of
poor
man’s multimethods. Or rather method overloading based on runtime types
instead of compile-time.

David V.


#9

Thanks for all that David :slight_smile:


#10

On Feb 12, 2006, at 11:38 AM, Edward K. wrote:

Anyone able to point me to a resource please?

I’m currently reading Higher-Order Perl by Mark Jason Dominus, which
is really just a functional programming techniques handbook for
Perl. I’m writing about what I’m finding along the way, and
translating much of the code. It probably makes a lot more sense if
you read the book first, but here are the links, in case they help:

http://blog.grayproductions.net/articles/2006/01/17/recursion-and-
callbacks
http://blog.grayproductions.net/articles/2006/01/17/dispatch-tables
http://blog.grayproductions.net/articles/2006/01/20/caching-and-
memoization
http://blog.grayproductions.net/articles/2006/01/31/iterators-
chapters-4-and-5

I’ll have the infinite streams article up soon…

James Edward G. II


#11

Hi,

In message “Re: Ruby’s lisp features.”
on Mon, 13 Feb 2006 02:38:18 +0900, Edward K.
removed_email_address@domain.invalid writes:

|I’ve been programming for more years than I care to remember and am
|enjoying programming in Ruby (especially on Rails). So far I’ve found
|nothing “new” (to me) in Ruby, with the exception of the lisp-like
|features and that’s something I’d really like to explore.

|Anyone able to point me to a resource please?

Ruby is a language designed in the following steps:

  • take a simple lisp language (like one prior to CL).
  • remove macros, s-expression.
  • add simple object system (much simpler than CLOS).
  • add blocks, inspired by higher order functions.
  • add methods found in Smalltalk.
  • add functionality found in Perl (in OO way).

So, Ruby was a Lisp originally, in theory.
Let’s call it MatzLisp from now on. :wink:

						matz.

#12

+1, definite buy for me.


#13

DÅ?a Pondelok 13 Február 2006 05:43 Yukihiro M. napísal:

Ruby is a language designed in the following steps:

  • take a simple lisp language (like one prior to CL).
  • remove macros, s-expression.
  • add simple object system (much simpler than CLOS).
  • add blocks, inspired by higher order functions.
  • add methods found in Smalltalk.
  • add functionality found in Perl (in OO way).

You forgot adding onions to taste.

So, Ruby was a Lisp originally, in theory.
Let’s call it MatzLisp from now on. :wink:

I always thought of it as a Smalltalk / Perl crossbreed. Might be
because ST
ripped off the same features of lisp as Ruby does…

MatzLisp… MatzLisp… MatzLisp…
Cor, let’s stay with “Ruby”, I don’t have enough paper tissues to wipe
spit
off people if I had to pronounce that :wink:

David V.


#14

Bil K. wrote:

Is there a Friday,

http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/fridays.html

on Rake in the works?

I want one.

In the interim, any chance of the Rake wiki being restored from spam
hell?

http://rake.rubyforge.org/wiki/wiki.pl

(I’ve never bothered using the wiki for any of my RubyForge projects, so
I don’t know if fighting spam there is a lost cause.)


James B.

“You harmonize; then you customize.”

  • Wilson Pickett

#15

Yukihiro M. wrote:

So, Ruby was a Lisp originally, in theory.
Let’s call it MatzLisp from now on. :wink:

Matth


James B.

“Blanket statements are over-rated”


#16

James B. wrote:

In the interim, any chance of the Rake wiki being restored from spam
hell?

http://rake.rubyforge.org/wiki/wiki.pl

(I’ve never bothered using the wiki for any of my RubyForge projects, so
I don’t know if fighting spam there is a lost cause.

The wiki is a lost cause. It was way to much work to keep it despammed.
I disabled it from the rubyforge interface, but apparently the wiki is
still running if you got there directly with the URL.

All the information that used to be on the wiki is available (in one
form or another) at http://docs.rubyrake.org/.

I will update the main wiki page to point people to the new docs, but
chances are that spammers will just overwrite it.


– Jim W.


#17

The wiki is a lost cause. It was way to much work to keep it
despammed.
I disabled it from the rubyforge interface, but apparently
the wiki is
still running if you got there directly with the URL.

Ah. Sad.

Yup, I need to fix that… it’s been on my List Of Things To Do for a
while…

Yours,

Tom


#18

Jim W. wrote:

The wiki is a lost cause. It was way to much work to keep it despammed.
I disabled it from the rubyforge interface, but apparently the wiki is
still running if you got there directly with the URL.

Ah. Sad.

All the information that used to be on the wiki is available (in one
form or another) at http://docs.rubyrake.org/.

I will update the main wiki page to point people to the new docs, but
chances are that spammers will just overwrite it.

Can you lock it with chmod?

Oh, and why I went to the wiki in the first place:

How can I call one Rake task from inside another task?

Thanks,

James


James B.

“You harmonize; then you customize.”

  • Wilson Pickett

#19

James B. wrote:

Jim W. wrote:

The wiki is a lost cause. It was way to much work to keep it despammed.
I disabled it from the rubyforge interface, but apparently the wiki is
still running if you got there directly with the URL.

Ah. Sad.

All the information that used to be on the wiki is available (in one
form or another) at http://docs.rubyrake.org/.

I will update the main wiki page to point people to the new docs, but
chances are that spammers will just overwrite it.

Can you lock it with chmod?

Lacking shell access on rubyforge makes this difficult to do stuff like
that. However, I see Tom has seen this thread. Perhaps he will be
gently nudged to do something :slight_smile:

Oh, and why I went to the wiki in the first place:

How can I call one Rake task from inside another task?

Just for you, I started a FAQ section in the User Guide. See
http://docs.rubyrake.org/read/chapter/10#page38.

Does that answer your question?


#20

From: “Tom C.” removed_email_address@domain.invalid

while…
Sorry for jumping into the middle of the thread, if this has
already been discussed…

I was wondering if there might be any simple way to limit access to
the wiki to just folks with project admin access. Maybe disable
the normal page edit link, and move it to some URL only reachable
by logged-in admins?

My thinking is that wikis can still be a handy way to author/maintain
documentation, even if the “globally editable” aspect is no
longer sustainable due to hoodlums.

Just a thought - and, regardless: thanks VERY much for rubyforge !!!

Regards,

Bill