Rake and Rant

I was wondering whether anybody has had any experience with both these
Ruby
build tools. If so, which one would be more suitable for large projects
that contain both C++ and Java source code?

Rant is a superset of Rake in that it has everything Rake has and more,
so
if you are looking for a build tool that uses Ruby as its underlying
language then you should go with Rant. You can use only a subset of it
and
pretend it is Rake if you want.

On Sun, Aug 12, 2007 at 03:35:05AM +0900, barcaroller wrote:

I was wondering whether anybody has had any experience with both these Ruby
build tools. If so, which one would be more suitable for large projects
that contain both C++ and Java source code?

Yes, Rake is perfectly useful in large non-ruby projects as a build
tool. According to
(http://railsenvy.com/2007/6/11/ruby-on-rails-rake-tutorial) Jim
actually created Rake to deal with a Java project. And that link is a
good tutorial too.

Jim has a few tutorials on using Rake with C :

http://onestepback.org/index.cgi/Tech/Rake/Tutorial/RakeTutorialIntroduction.rdoc

http://onestepback.org/index.cgi/Tech/Rake/Tutorial/RakeTutorialAnotherCExample.red

enjoy,

-jeremy

barcaroller wrote:

I was wondering whether anybody has had any experience with both these Ruby
build tools. If so, which one would be more suitable for large projects
that contain both C++ and Java source code?
I’ve used Rake on a few C/C++ projects myself - if you want to see an
example of a fairly complex C project using Rake, check out the Rubinius
source.

The same as for make - shell out to the compiler, then parse the result.
gcc -MM is what I’m familiar with, I presume other compilers have
similar switches. Rant does have this built in, but I’m not familiar
with it (although having just researched it a little, I think I will
make the effort now :slight_smile: )

I found

require ‘rake/loaders/makefile’

file “.depends.mf” => [SRC_LIST] do |t|
sh “makedepend -f- – #{CFLAGS} – #{t.prerequisites} > #{t.name}”
end

import “.depends.mf”

at

http://docs.rubyrake.org/read/chapter/4

Still a native Ruby solution would be nicer.

Brad

Alex Y. wrote:

barcaroller wrote:

I was wondering whether anybody has had any experience with both these
Ruby build tools. If so, which one would be more suitable for large
projects that contain both C++ and Java source code?
I’ve used Rake on a few C/C++ projects myself - if you want to see an
example of a fairly complex C project using Rake, check out the Rubinius
source.

I don’t think that Rake currently has the concept of a scanner for
automatically discovering dependencies such as in header file
hierarchies. SCons for example has this built in. What is the
best way of going about auto generating dependencies within
Rake for C/C++ projects?

I would prefer to use Rake than SCons for C/C++

Brad

Brad P. wrote:

I don’t think that Rake currently has the concept of a scanner for
automatically discovering dependencies such as in header file
hierarchies. SCons for example has this built in. What is the
best way of going about auto generating dependencies within
Rake for C/C++ projects?
The same as for make - shell out to the compiler, then parse the result.
gcc -MM is what I’m familiar with, I presume other compilers have
similar switches. Rant does have this built in, but I’m not familiar
with it (although having just researched it a little, I think I will
make the effort now :slight_smile: )

Still a native Ruby solution would be nicer.

Why, is you C compiler a Ruby solution?

mfg, simon … l

Brad P. wrote:

Still a native Ruby solution would be nicer.

If someone wanted to contribute a dependency scanner for their favorite
language to the Rake project, I would be willing to consider it for
inclusion.

A C/C++ scanner shouldn’t be that hard to write. Its just that I’ve not
working in a C/C++ project since starting Rake, so I’ve never had the
need to write one.


– Jim W.

david karapetyan wrote:

Rant is a superset of Rake in that it has everything Rake has and more,

Although that may have once been true, it is certainly no longer the
case. Neither Rant nor Rake are supersets of the other, for both have
evolved beyond the early Rake functionality upon which Rant was based.
(Also note that the rake/rant comparison on the rant project page is
quite dated).

– Jim W.

my mistake.

Jim W. wrote:


– Jim W.

With regards to the RANT project http://rubyforge.org/projects/make/
where I nicked the scanner this should do the job.

===========================================

module Rake
module C
module Include
def Include.depends(file)
File.open file do |f|
txt = f.read
parse_includes txt
end
end

      # Searches for all `#include' statements in the C/C++ source
      # from the string +src+.
      #
      # Returns two arguments:
      # 1. A list of all standard library includes (e.g. #include

<stdio.h>).
# 2. A list of all local includes (e.g. #include “stdio.h”).
def Include.parse_includes(src)
if src.respond_to? :to_str
src = src.to_str
else
raise ArgumentError, “src has to be a string”
end
s_includes = []
l_includes = []
in_block_comment = false
prev_line = nil
src.each { |line|
line.chomp!
if block_start_i = line.index("/")
c_start_i = line.index("//")
if !c_start_i || block_start_i < c_start_i
if block_end_i = line.index("
/")
if block_end_i > block_start_i
line[block_start_i…block_end_i+1] = “”
end
end
end
end
if prev_line
line = prev_line << line
prev_line = nil
end
if line =~ /\$/
prev_line = line.chomp[0…line.length-1]
end
if in_block_comment
in_block_comment = false if line =~ %r|*/|
next
end
case line
when /\s*#\sinclude\s+"([^"]+)"/
l_includes << $1
when /\s
#\sinclude\s+<([^>]+)>/
s_includes << $1
when %r|(?!//)[^/]
/*|
in_block_comment = true
end
}
[s_includes, l_includes]
end
end
end
end

RAKE Rule figures out the dependencies for the C file

rule( /.o$/ =>

   proc do |task_name|
       a = []
       name = task_name.sub(/\.[^.]+$/, '.c')
       s_includes, l_includes = Rake::C::Include.depends(name)
       a << name
       a << l_includes
       a
   end

 ) do |t|
  sh "cc #{t.source} -c -o #{t.name}"

end

The scanner is not recursive yet but should be simple
to implement but I have to run …

Regards

Brad P. wrote:

the need to write one.
module Rake
# from the string +src+.
end
if block_end_i > block_start_i
prev_line = line.chomp[0…line.length-1]
when %r|(?!//)[^/]*/*|

RAKE Rule figures out the dependencies for the C file

  end


Brad P.
http://xtargets.com

My simple test rake file was

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

require ‘cscanner’

task :default => ‘main.out’

file ‘main.out’ => [ ‘main.o’ ] do |t|
sh “cc -o #{t.name} #{t.prerequisites.join(’ ')}”
end

+++

and the C/H file was

+++
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include “main.h”
int main ( int argc, char * argv[] ){
printf(“Hello world”);
return 0;
}

++

#ifndef MAIN
#define MAIN
typedef struct {
int a;
int b;
} Foo;
#endif

and it seemed to work ok

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