RailsForge

I notice so many new projects are RoR oriented these days. Anyone
thinking about a dedicated RailsForge?

T.

On 6/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

I notice so many new projects are RoR oriented these days. Anyone
thinking about a dedicated RailsForge?

Why? I don’t particularly have a problem with RubyForge hosting a lot
of Rails projects.

-austin

On 6/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

I notice so many new projects are RoR oriented these days. Anyone
thinking about a dedicated RailsForge?

Why? I don’t particularly have a problem with RubyForge hosting a lot
of Rails projects.

what he said.

On 6/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

I notice so many new projects are RoR oriented these days. Anyone
thinking about a dedicated RailsForge?

I already worry about the growing separation between the RoR and
Ruby communities. I’m afraid that a distinct RailsForge would only
exacerbate the problem.

pat eyler wrote:

On 6/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

I notice so many new projects are RoR oriented these days. Anyone
thinking about a dedicated RailsForge?

I already worry about the growing separation between the RoR and
Ruby communities. I’m afraid that a distinct RailsForge would only
exacerbate the problem.

Indeed.

A possible benefit might be the creation of an all-Ruby replacement for
GForge.

But that’s making a large assumption, and I’d prefer to see less
bifurcation.


James B.

“I was born not knowing and have had only a little
time to change that here and there.”

  • Richard P. Feynman

On Jun 22, 2006, at 11:37 AM, [email protected] wrote:

As for why a RailsForge. I personally have scant interest in Rails, so
all that Rails stuff is additional noise I must filter. And I imagine
there are Rails folk who are just the opposite. It’s not like we can’t
browse both sites, but at least it could help separate and organize
intent.

But both communities contribute nice libraries. We don’t want to
stop that cross pollination.

James Edward G. II

pat eyler wrote:

On 6/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

I notice so many new projects are RoR oriented these days. Anyone
thinking about a dedicated RailsForge?

I already worry about the growing separation between the RoR and
Ruby communities. I’m afraid that a distinct RailsForge would only
exacerbate the problem.

Growing separation? Huh. That’s interesting. I worry about similar
idea, I think, but from a different perpective. I worry that Rails is
consuming Ruby and that in time Ruby may loose most of it’s identity as
a language akin to Perl, say. And instead become thought of more like
PHP.

As for why a RailsForge. I personally have scant interest in Rails, so
all that Rails stuff is additional noise I must filter. And I imagine
there are Rails folk who are just the opposite. It’s not like we can’t
browse both sites, but at least it could help separate and organize
intent.

Just a thought,
T.

[email protected] wrote:

Growing separation? Huh. That’s interesting. I worry about similar
idea, I think, but from a different perpective. I worry that Rails is
consuming Ruby and that in time Ruby may loose most of it’s identity as
a language akin to Perl, say. And instead become thought of more like
PHP.

Not an unreasonable concern. But the sense I get in my part of the
world is that there really is a separation, with people who only know
Ruby as Rails, and other people who use Ruby, but have only a passing
interest in Rails.

As for why a RailsForge. I personally have scant interest in Rails, so
all that Rails stuff is additional noise I must filter. And I imagine
there are Rails folk who are just the opposite. It’s not like we can’t
browse both sites, but at least it could help separate and organize
intent.

This, in general, is an interesting challenge. How to encourage
distributed efforts while making it easy for people to interact with a
preferred collection of such efforts as though they were all in one
place. (Portals are something of an approximation, but don’t quite do
it for me; they always seem to emphasize, rather than mask, the
disjunction.)


James B.

“I was born not knowing and have had only a little
time to change that here and there.”

  • Richard P. Feynman

On 6/22/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

Growing separation? Huh. That’s interesting. I worry about similar
idea, I think, but from a different perpective. I worry that Rails is
consuming Ruby and that in time Ruby may loose most of it’s identity as
a language akin to Perl, say. And instead become thought of more like
PHP.

I think we might not be as far apart as you think we are. My concern is
more that the Rails community loses sight of Ruby and ends up drifting
with a “different” Ruby than the rest of us have, and that their Ruby is
the only one the rest of the world sees.

As for why a RailsForge. I personally have scant interest in Rails, so
all that Rails stuff is additional noise I must filter. And I imagine
there are Rails folk who are just the opposite. It’s not like we can’t
browse both sites, but at least it could help separate and organize
intent.

I also have little interest in Rails, but I do see some cool things that
could jump out of the Rails community and into the Ruby community.

I’d also hate to put one more stumbling block between the Rails-folk
and Ruby. The fact that Rails users already try to start up Rails/Ruby
groups in areas that already have Ruby Brigades leads me to believe
that we need to work harder to remind the Railsians that there’s a great
language hiding in their framework, with a vibrant and interesting
community already.

As far as differentiation, perhaps we just need to do more work to
provide the separation within the existing RubyForge site, for example:

  • provide a Rails only, Ruby only, and mixed feed of announcements
  • provide searches local to those views

Just a thought,
T.

Thanks for sharing,

pat eyler wrote:


I’d also hate to put one more stumbling block between the Rails-folk
and Ruby. The fact that Rails users already try to start up Rails/Ruby
groups in areas that already have Ruby Brigades leads me to believe
that we need to work harder to remind the Railsians that there’s a great
language hiding in their framework, with a vibrant and interesting
community already.

This is what may happen in Phoenix. There’s a Ruby group that has been
doing well for about 6 months or so. Attendance fluctuates, but I
think there is gradual growth.

But there may be a Rails group starting soon, and I’m skeptical that
people will be making the time to attend both each month.

My gut feeling is that such a group will squeeze out the Ruby group
(despite the fact that we talk about Rails stuff almost every meeting).

I may go to both, but don’t really plan on regular attendance at a Rails
group, even if it is the only Ruby group that remains.

Now, part of the matter is geography; there are Rails developers who
work some distance from the where the Ruby meetings are held. The idea
of a Ruby meeting, of any kind, that is closer is appealing.

But it seems that most people who would prefer the Rails meeting are
more interested in learning the quirks of has_and_belongs_to_many than
in understanding blocks and metaprogramming.

And I think that, in the end, they’ll get really good at manipulating a
particular API, but will not learn as much Ruby as they could.

The flip side, of course, is that perhaps that is exactly what they
want, and for good reasons. So it may be unfair to expect them to sit
through boring discussions of method_missing and instance_eval.


James B.

“I was born not knowing and have had only a little
time to change that here and there.”

  • Richard P. Feynman

On Jun 22, 2006, at 12:32 PM, James B. wrote:

PHP.

Not an unreasonable concern. But the sense I get in my part of
the world is that there really is a separation, with people who
only know Ruby as Rails, and other people who use Ruby, but have
only a passing interest in Rails.

From my part of the world, I see a slurry. I trust it continues to
melt. I’ve heard many a Railsista wax eloquent on the allure of their
ruddy new gem - some of these folks are just brimming.

Ruby fossils are right to be wary: maybe the invaders aren’t so nice?
or are too leechy or inane to tolerate? (e.g. ruby-forum slouching
toward content-freedom.)

But, that joyfulness! It’s in them too and those who love it are
exploring why.

jeremy

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs