Rails vs. Turbogears

Hi guys.

My team is evaluating Turbogears versus Ruby on Rails for an upcoming
project. I have this very strong feeling that we should go for Rails,
but apparently I cannot word it well enough. I’ve been Googling for a
while, but all I’m able to find are one-year old discussions, which I
don’t feel hold true anymore. Thus, I try to take it here.

To be perfectly honest, I feel that Turbogears is vastly inferior to
Rails. I didn’t find a single relevant feature in Turbogears, that I
wasn’t there in Rails. Yet, I can name quite a list for the reverse.
Can you guys help me with the argumentation? And do you know of any
comparisons that are up-to-date?

Thanks.

/Stefan

Stefan K. wrote:

Hi guys.

My team is evaluating Turbogears versus Ruby on Rails for an upcoming
project. I have this very strong feeling that we should go for Rails,
but apparently I cannot word it well enough. I’ve been Googling for a
while, but all I’m able to find are one-year old discussions, which I
don’t feel hold true anymore. Thus, I try to take it here.

To be perfectly honest, I feel that Turbogears is vastly inferior to
Rails. I didn’t find a single relevant feature in Turbogears, that I
wasn’t there in Rails. Yet, I can name quite a list for the reverse.
Can you guys help me with the argumentation? And do you know of any
comparisons that are up-to-date?

Thanks.

/Stefan

Why would they consider Turbogear over Django? well, nevermind. I
prefer Ruby code over Python in any case.

Hi, I was able to recommend Ruby on Rails to a client after showing him
a
prototype of one of the components from the spec. It worked much better
in
conjunction with documentation. After my client saw the prototype, they
were sold on the idea on using Rails. BTW, this was a Rails vs Django
decision. Furthermore, I feel that it’s always good to understand other
frameworks to make better arguments to not use or use them. Now, I have
a
specification that’s implemented using the following frameworks:

Ruby on Rails
Seaside
Zend Framework

I need to complete the documentation which provides metrics to present
to
potential clients in the future. Also, I need to provide other
frameworks
for the presentation. For example, Python Zope and ASP.Net (C#) are
possible addition. Well, I must go and I wish you the best of luck.

-Conrad

Have your team look at SQL on Rails – much simpler than those other
frameworks:
http://www.sqlonrails.org/

There’s a good screencast there too.

  • Jeremy

Stefan K. wrote:

wasn’t there in Rails. Yet, I can name quite a list for the reverse.
Can you guys help me with the argumentation? And do you know of any
comparisons that are up-to-date?

Thanks.

The comparison is not up-to-date and is superficial but take a look at
Sean Kelly’s Better Web App Development video:

It’s been a while since I’ve looked at TurboGears but at the time I did
my impression was that it had a lot less “magic” than Rails, which is
good or bad depending on your preference about that sort of thing, but
it does make for more code writing, and it felt sort of “awkward” given
that it is a “mashup” of a bunch of different stuff bolted together
rather than a cohesive stack that was extracted from a real app like
Rails and Django were. That bolted together philosophy is evident in
their 2.0 plans where they plan on swapping out many if not most of the
major components wholesale for presumably better ones.


Michael W.

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