Problem with closure/block

###########################
y=5
print “y: " + y.to_s + “\n”
text_at_the_end = lambda do |y|
print y + " text at the end\n”
end

print "y: " + y.to_s + “\n”

def oneparam
yield(“oneparam”)
end

oneparam(&text_at_the_end)
print "y: " + y + “\n”

########################
It gives the following output:

y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: oneparam

Is this a bug? Shouldn’t “y” be in a local scope in “text_at_the_end”?
I just downloadad Ruby yesterday:

Ruby Version 1.8.6
Installer Version 186-26

On Jan 9, 3:42 pm, “[email protected][email protected] wrote:

yield(“oneparam”)
oneparam text at the end
y: oneparam

Is this a bug? Shouldn’t “y” be in a local scope in “text_at_the_end”?
I just downloadad Ruby yesterday:

Ruby Version 1.8.6
Installer Version 186-26

There are past threads that discuss this, but, basically, no, it’s not
a bug, that’s just how Ruby does it.

On Jan 9, 4:42 pm, “[email protected][email protected] wrote:

yield(“oneparam”)
oneparam text at the end
y: oneparam

Is this a bug? Shouldn’t “y” be in a local scope in “text_at_the_end”?
I just downloadad Ruby yesterday:

Ruby Version 1.8.6
Installer Version 186-26

“However, if at the time the block executes a local variable
already exists with the same name as that of a variable in
the block, the existing local variable will be used in the
block. Its value will therefore be available after the block
finishes.”

“Programming Ruby” p. 106

Whether this is a “bug” or a “feature” is in the eye of the beholder,
but it is something you should be aware of.

Has this changed in 1.9, or is it anticipated to change in 2.0 ?

Has this changed in 1.9, or is it anticipated to change in 2.0 ?

With small change (added .to_s method)

$ cat proc.rb
###########################
y=5
print “y: " + y.to_s + “\n”
text_at_the_end = lambda do |y|
print y + " text at the end\n”
end

print "y: " + y.to_s + “\n”

def oneparam
yield(“oneparam”)
end

oneparam(&text_at_the_end)
print "y: " + y.to_s + “\n”

########################

$ ruby1.8 proc.rb
y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: oneparam

$ ruby1.9 proc.rb
y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: 5

Rados³aw Bu³at

http://radarek.jogger.pl - mój blog

[email protected] wrote:

def oneparam
y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: oneparam

Is this a bug? Shouldn’t “y” be in a local scope in “text_at_the_end”?
I just downloadad Ruby yesterday:

Ruby Version 1.8.6
Installer Version 186-2

Blocks in Ruby are closures, so they save the context in which they were
created, but new variables inside the closure are local.

irb(main):001:0> x = 1
=> 1
irb(main):002:0> l = lambda do |y|
irb(main):003:1* puts x
irb(main):004:1> puts y
irb(main):005:1> end
=> #Proc:[email protected]:2(irb)
irb(main):006:0> l[‘hello’]
1
hello
=> nil
irb(main):007:0> y
NameError: undefined local variable or method `y’ for main:Object
from (irb):7
from :0
irb(main):008:0> x
=> 1
irb(main):009:0> x += 1
=> 2
irb(main):010:0> l[‘again’]
2
again
=> nil

Take a look here:
http://ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/tut_containers.html#UG

-Justin

"Blocks in Ruby are closures, so they save the context in which they
were
created, but new variables inside the closure are local. "

I just expected, that if the head of the closure has x, it will create
a new local variable with the same name.

On 1/9/08, Rados³aw Bu³at [email protected] wrote:

end

y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: 5

And if you use the -w option ruby 1.9 will warn that the semantics have
changed.

$ ruby1.9 -w proc.rb
proc.rb:4: warning: shadowing outer local variable - y
y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: 5

$ ruby -w proc.rb
y: 5
y: 5
oneparam text at the end
y: oneparam


Rick DeNatale

My blog on Ruby
http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/

On Jan 10, 9:13 am, “[email protected][email protected] wrote:

###########################
end
y: oneparam
irb(main):001:0> x = 1
irb(main):007:0> y
=> nil

Take a look here:http://ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/html/tut_containers.html#UG

-Justin

I think it’s an advantage in javascript, that you have to mark new
variables with “var”, so the scope of a variable is always obvious.

I think it’s an advantage in javascript, that you have to mark new
variables with “var”, so the scope of a variable is always obvious.

JS doesn’t have it right… if anything, I’ve seen it cause MUCH MORE
confusion wrt closures.
‘var’ is context-specific (only applies INSIDE functions, but
syntactically valid outside) and it is just a hint, not a declaration.
These are the same:

function a(z) { var x = z; return function () {return x} }
function b(z) { x = z; return function () {return x}; var x }

and:

var x = 10; // outside a function

is both misleading and useless.

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