Preceding zero

hi.

I want to format a Integer value to a hour with a preceding zero.(two
digits)
eg. 8 => 08

Exists a Ruby or Rails function for that?

thanks
Michael

On Sun, 2009-09-27 at 19:26 +0200, Michael … wrote:

hi.

I want to format a Integer value to a hour with a preceding zero.(two
digits)
eg. 8 => 08

Exists a Ruby or Rails function for that?


you can easily create your own function and put it into application.rb
or the helper

myvar < 10 ? “0” + myvar.to_s : myvar.to_s

it must be a string to retain the leading zero

Craig


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Craig W. wrote:


you can easily create your own function and put it into application.rb
or the helper

myvar < 10 ? “0” + myvar.to_s : myvar.to_s

it must be a string to retain the leading zero

or “%02d” % myvar

Cheers,
Mohit.
9/28/2009 | 1:52 AM.

On Mon, 2009-09-28 at 01:52 +0800, Mohit S. wrote:


you can easily create your own function and put it into application.rb
or the helper

myvar < 10 ? “0” + myvar.to_s : myvar.to_s

it must be a string to retain the leading zero

or “%02d” % myvar


ok - you win

Craig


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dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.

Craig W. wrote:

Exists a Ruby or Rails function for that?


ok - you win

Craig

yes another way

irb(main):024:0> val = 8
=> 8
irb(main):025:0> str = sprintf( “%02d”, val )
=> “08”
irb(main):026:0> p str
“08”
=> nil


Kind Regards,
Rajinder Y.

http://DevMentor.org
Do Good ~ Share Freely

On Sep 27, 2009, at 2:26 PM, Rajinder Y. wrote:

eg. 8 => 08
it must be a string to retain the leading zero
irb(main):025:0> str = sprintf( “%02d”, val )
Do Good ~ Share Freely
This isn’t another way, it’s the exact same way.

--------------------------------------------------------------- String#%
str % arg => new_str

  Format---Uses str as a format specification, and returns the
  result of applying it to arg. If the format specification contains
  more than one substitution, then arg must be an Array containing
  the values to be substituted. See Kernel::sprintf for details of
  the format string.

     "%05d" % 123                       #=> "00123"
     "%-5s: %08x" % [ "ID", self.id ]   #=> "ID   : 200e14d6"

The String class just makes is a bit easier to type.

-Rob

Rob B. http://agileconsultingllc.com
[email protected]

Craig W. wrote:

myvar < 10 ? “0” + myvar.to_s : myvar.to_s

it must be a string to retain the leading zero

or “%02d” % myvar


ok - you win

Craig

Hardly :slight_smile: I just use that a lot!! A lot of my work involves data
conversion and when outputting it, sending out 7 or 10 decimal places
looks clumsy. So, it’s short hand that I’ve become accustomed to
writing :slight_smile:

Cheers,
Mohit.
9/28/2009 | 11:48 AM.

On Sun, Sep 27, 2009 at 10:58 PM, Rob B.
[email protected] wrote:

(two
myvar < 10 ? “0” + myvar.to_s : myvar.to_s
irb(main):024:0> val = 8

 result of applying it to arg. If the format specification contains
 more than one substitution, then arg must be an Array containing
 the values to be substituted. See Kernel::sprintf for details of
 the format string.

    "%05d" % 123                       #=> "00123"
    "%-5s: %08x" % [ "ID", self.id ]   #=> "ID   : 200e14d6"

The String class just makes is a bit easier to type.

Rob you’re right its the same thing, different syntax, me thinks my
C++ style is showing :wink:


Kind Regards,
Rajinder Y.

May the { source } be with you !

Thanks for your help.

Best Regards,
Michael

str.ljust(integer, padstr=’ ') => new_str

If integer is greater than the length of str, returns a new String of
length integer with str left justified and padded with padstr;
otherwise, returns str.

“hello”.ljust(4) #=> “hello”
“hello”.ljust(20) #=> "hello "
“hello”.ljust(20, ‘1234’) #=> “hello123412341234123”

I don’t need to paste the doc for ‘rjust’, do I? :wink:

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