Pondering comments and logins

I’ve been playing with Radiant for a couple of days – actually, I
stared cross-eyed at it for a day and a half, and finally understood it
well enough to do things with it for half a day:-)

I want to start off by using it as a blog, but I need to add the ability
for readers to add comments. It was easy enough to display comments
added as children of a main page by adding a few lines to the layout in
the “<r:if_content part=“extended”>” section:

<r:children:each>

-- Posted by on

It looks fairly easy to add an “Accepts Comments” behavior following the
general design of Oliver B.'s Search behavior. This would provide
an “Add Comment” button and associated text field, maybe using AJAX. It
looks like pages aren’t meant to be created except by a logged-in user,
and this might be a problem. I’d like to be able to allow someone to
post a comment without making them a full-fledged user. I don’t
understand the permissions system very well yet, though.

But that brings me to my main point. The login system seems thoroughly
embedded in the structure of the application. However, I’d really prefer
to use OpenID http://openid.net or my own OpenProfile extension of
OpenID http://openprofile.net in place of some or all of it. (I think
OpenID provides about as much authentication as you can get in a web
app, and it’s nice for the users.)

So I thought I’d ask more experienced people about these issues here
before I started slicing and dicing. Is there a better approach to
allowing comments to be posted? Is there a non-violent way to swapping
out the login/authentication system?

–Al Evans

Al Evans wrote:

It looks fairly easy to add an “Accepts Comments” behavior following the
general design of Oliver B.'s Search behavior. This would provide
an “Add Comment” button and associated text field, maybe using AJAX. It
looks like pages aren’t meant to be created except by a logged-in user,
and this might be a problem. I’d like to be able to allow someone to
post a comment without making them a full-fledged user. I don’t
understand the permissions system very well yet, though.

Commenting is on the official roadmap, but I’m not sure what to tell you
in the meantime. It should be possible to make an “Accepts Comments”
behavior like you describe. You just need to call the appropriate
methods on the model objects when the form is posted. Matt McCray’s
mailer behavior might be a good one to look at
(http://dev.radiantcms.org/radiant/wiki/ThirdPartyBehaviors).

But that brings me to my main point. The login system seems thoroughly
embedded in the structure of the application. However, I’d really prefer
to use OpenID http://openid.net or my own OpenProfile extension of
OpenID http://openprofile.net in place of some or all of it. (I think
OpenID provides about as much authentication as you can get in a web
app, and it’s nice for the users.)

I’m not very familiar with openid, but I think you could write a plugin
fairly easily. Just require the WelcomeController and override the
login and logout methods to do what you need.


John L.
http://radiantcms.org

/Commenting is on the official roadmap/

Is Radiant going to become a blogger CMS like all the rest of them?

Josh

Josh F. wrote:

/Commenting is on the official roadmap/

Is Radiant going to become a blogger CMS like all the rest of them?

Josh

Adding a capability doesn’t eliminate any existing capabilities…

–Al Evans

I’d think it’s more like comments:ok, integrated flickr/ma.gnolia/cork’d
support = blogging app. Now as plugins, sure, but…

Josh F. wrote:

/Commenting is on the official roadmap/

Is Radiant going to become a blogger CMS like all the rest of them?

Somewhat. It will be more of a CMS that supports blogging (unlike
Textpattern which is a blogging system that seems like a CMS).


John L.
http://wiseheartdesign.com

I don’t suppose we could move the admin pages to have parts like pages
on normal sites do that we could just turn off if we didn’t need it? My
issue is not that commenting is a bad thing to have, heck I need
commenting for my blog, it’s that I don’t like adding things to the
admin interface that are useless and confusing to people who aren’t
using it… I mean it would be nice to have a settings page with a list
of ‘base settings’ and ‘extensions’ where I could turn on and off form
fields and stuff that were part of those extensions that I did not use.

I guess I could write it.

Josh

Josh F. wrote:

I don’t suppose we could move the admin pages to have parts like pages
on normal sites do that we could just turn off if we didn’t need it? My
issue is not that commenting is a bad thing to have, heck I need
commenting for my blog, it’s that I don’t like adding things to the
admin interface that are useless and confusing to people who aren’t
using it…

I’m sensitive to this issue as well. If possible I’d like there to be
enough hooks in the admin system that commenting could be implemented as
a plugin.


John L.
http://wiseheartdesign.com

++ on openid (or openprofile, for that matter.)

I agree. In addition, commenting will be very useful, for example, for
documentation sites where users could add comments to existing manual
pages or other social network type sites, like comments on a certain
product, itinerary, etc. --M

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs