Plugin best practices

If your making a plugin/extension for another project, do you create a
hyphenated lib file or do you put the library file in a subdirectory,
e.g. say it’s a plugin for rdoc,

lib/rdoc-foo.rb

Or

lib/rdoc/foo.rb

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 11:36 AM, Intransition [email protected]
wrote:

If your making a plugin/extension for another project, do you create a
hyphenated lib file or do you put the library file in a subdirectory,

I’d follow project conventions of how code is organized. If they do
project/foo-lib.rb, I do that. If they do project/foo/lib.rb, I do
that.

If there is no discernible pattern, I’d go with
project/plugin/foo/lib.rb.


Phillip G.

A method of solution is perfect if we can forsee from the start,
and even prove, that following that method we shall attain our aim.
– Leibnitz

On Wed, Jun 15, 2011 at 4:36 AM, Intransition [email protected]
wrote:

According to both of the resources I’d reference, it should be the
latter.

===== http://guides.rubygems.org/patterns/#use_dashes_for_extensions

Adding new functionality to an existing gem? Use a dash. Some examples
include net-http-persistent and autotest-growl. Usually this implies
that
youll have to require into their directory tree as well. For example,
gem install net-http-persistent becomes require 'net/http/persistent'.

===== http://chneukirchen.github.com/rps/ =====

Project names SHOULD only contain underscores as separators in their
names. If a project is an enhancement, plugin, extension, etc. for some
other project it SHOULD contain a dash in the name between the original
name
and the projects name. File names and directory structure SHOULD
correspond
like this:

Library: foo-bar
Directory: lib/foo/bar
Namespace: Foo::Bar

Library: foo_bar
Directory: lib/foo_bar
Namespace: FooBar

On Jun 15, 2011, at 5:33 AM, Intransition wrote:

Yea, I was afraid you would say that :wink:

Technically speaking this is a bad idea. The reason is that if someone
wanted to install a project in the traditional site ruby locations
(e.g. via setup.rb),

(How many ruby packages have a setup.rb anymore, and who uses them? Is
it even 5% of rubyists? 1%?)

then there is the potential for file name
conflicts such that the last package installed will clobber the file
from a previous package.

If everybody agreed to foo-bar.rb instead of foo/bar.rb that wouldn’t
solve the problem as they both share the same name.

Giving two implementations the same file name is a social problem, not a
technical problem. We can’t solve this with a technical solution.

On Jun 15, 4:33pm, Eric H. [email protected] wrote:

then there is the potential for file name
conflicts such that the last package installed will clobber the file
from a previous package.

If everybody agreed to foo-bar.rb instead of foo/bar.rb that wouldn’t solve the
problem as they both share the same name.

Giving two implementations the same file name is a social problem, not a
technical problem. We can’t solve this with a technical solution.

If my plugin for foo is bar then my lib file will be foo-bar.rb
and my gem’s name foo-bar. So you won’t have the same name, because
I already have that gem. Clearly your gem and require will be foo- baz. No clash.

On Jun 15, 7:37am, Josh C. [email protected] wrote:

Library: foo_bar
Directory: lib/foo_bar
Namespace: FooBar

Yea, I was afraid you would say that :wink:

Technically speaking this is a bad idea. The reason is that if someone
wanted to install a project in the traditional site ruby locations
(e.g. via setup.rb), then there is the potential for file name
conflicts such that the last package installed will clobber the file
from a previous package. It also can be a problem with RubyGems where
two files can have identical paths in the eyes of #require, in which
case the file that gets loaded is simply first come first serve.
Obviously in practice it’s a rare issue b/c of the low odds that two
programmers will use the same file name, and even less likely that
both offending packages will get installed on the same system. But the
potential exists. In fact, with regards to plugins/extensions, the
most common pattern I’ve seen are rdoc’s and rubygem’s use of an
identical file in all project’s, none of which could work in a site
install, and are only made possible by installation via RubyGems, by
scanning the GEM_PATH.

I would highly recommend following YARD’s pattern of yard-foo
instead, if possible (it might not always be possible b/c of the
design of the program being extended.)

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