Packaging hybrid extension?

I’m writing something which is partially written in ruby, but uses an
extension which adds methods to some of the classes in the ruby part.

Right now I’ve got a directory which contains both the ruby code and
the so containing the extensions

$ls
mycode.rb mycode_prims.so

in mycode.rb I’ve got something like:

class Mycode
def foo
end
end

link in the primitives, mycode_prims includes various calls to

rb_define_method to add methods to the Mycode class.

require ‘mycode_prims’

Now this works if the directory containing both parts is the current
directory, but not otherwise. Actually I guess it would work as long
as the directory was on the load path, but I’m concerned about the
possibility of loading the wrong mycode_prims.so.

Is there a way to get the directory containing the current source
file? FILE only gives the file name, but not the path.

What is the right way to do this? I’d like to know how to approach
this either with the code packaged as a gem or as ‘source’.


Rick DeNatale

My blog on Ruby
http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/

On Tue, 10 Oct 2006, Rick DeNatale wrote:

directory, but not otherwise. Actually I guess it would work as long
as the directory was on the load path, but I’m concerned about the
possibility of loading the wrong mycode_prims.so.

Is there a way to get the directory containing the current source
file? FILE only gives the file name, but not the path.

What is the right way to do this? I’d like to know how to approach
this either with the code packaged as a gem or as ‘source’.

one idea is to do something like this

in foo.rb

require ‘rbconfig’

arch = Config::CONFIG[“arch”]
dlext = Config::CONFIG[“DLEXT”]

this = File.dirname FILE
archdir = File.join this, arch

lib = File.join archdir, “foo.#{ dlext }”
require lib

then you layout dirs like so

lib/foo.rb
lib/i686-linux/foo.so
lib/mswin/foo.dll

and you can distribute one gem, one tarball, etc. you also could just
dump
the *.so right into the libdir and do a

lib = File.join(File.dirname(FILE), “foo.#{ dlext }”)
require lib

for example. the key point is to bury the native lib close to the *.rb
file
and do a relative require.

hope that made sense…

-a

On Tue, 10 Oct 2006, Rick DeNatale wrote:

File.dirname(FILE) => ‘.’
na. it’s always relative to the current directory, so you just need to
expand
it (i forgot this part - sorry)

mussel:~ > cat /tmp/b.rb
puts File.dirname((FILE))

mussel:~ > ruby /tmp/b.rb
/tmp

mussel:~ > cat /tmp/a.rb
puts File.dirname(File.expand_path(FILE))

mussel:~ > ruby /tmp/b.rb
/tmp

mussel:~ > ruby -I/tmp -r a.rb -e nil
/tmp

i use this technique all over the place for relative requires:

http://codeforpeople.com/lib/ruby/rq/rq-2.3.4/lib/rq-2.3.4.rb

sorry for confusion.

cheers.

-a

On 10/9/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

The problem is that FILE only has the file name, not the path, so
mussel:~ > ruby /tmp/b.rb
mussel:~ > ruby -I/tmp -r a.rb -e nil
/tmp

i use this technique all over the place for relative requires:

http://codeforpeople.com/lib/ruby/rq/rq-2.3.4/lib/rq-2.3.4.rb

sorry for confusion.

Excellent! Thanks Ara.


Rick DeNatale

My blog on Ruby
http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/

On 10/9/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

this = File.dirname FILE
archdir = File.join this, arch

lib = File.join archdir, “foo.#{ dlext }”
require lib

The problem is that FILE only has the file name, not the path, so

File.dirname(FILE) => ‘.’


Rick DeNatale

My blog on Ruby
http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/

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