OT: "Unix" in Japanese

Since I figure there are probably a few Japanese Unix hackers on this
list (Matz at minimum), this might be the place to ask:

How do you “spell” the word “Unix” in Japanese? Do you use some kind of
katakana formation (like ユーニクス, perhaps), or is there Kanji for it,
or do you use romaji . . . or something that I’ve missed because I
didn’t
get much sleep last night?

While I’m at it . . . how is Ruby usually represented in Japanese?

Be gentle. My nihongo isn’t so good.

Hi,

In message “Re: OT: “Unix” in Japanese”
on Thu, 10 Apr 2008 23:17:58 +0900, Chad P.
[email protected] writes:

|Since I figure there are probably a few Japanese Unix hackers on this
|list (Matz at minimum), this might be the place to ask:
|
|How do you “spell” the word “Unix” in Japanese? Do you use some kind of
|katakana formation (like e$B%f!<%K%/%9e(B, perhaps), or is there Kanji for it,
|or do you use romaji . . . or something that I’ve missed because I didn’t
|get much sleep last night?

We spell UNIX as UNIX for most of the case. We pronounce UNIX as
“e$B%f%K%C%/%9e(B”, which is YU-NICK-S, just in case you can’t read
Katakana here.

|While I’m at it . . . how is Ruby usually represented in Japanese?

Ruby the language is Ruby. Sometimes people use Katakana (e$B%k%S!<e(B)
against my intention. We pronounce it as Ru-Bee.

          matz.

e$B%f%K%C%/%9e(B

On Apr 10, 2008, at 9:28 AM, Yukihiro M. wrote:

We pronounce it as Ru-Bee.

Not Lu-Bee, matz? :wink:

James Edward G. II

Hi,

In message “Re: OT: “Unix” in Japanese”
on Thu, 10 Apr 2008 23:33:20 +0900, James G.
[email protected] writes:

|> We pronounce it as Ru-Bee.
|
|Not Lu-Bee, matz? :wink:

Strictly speaking we don’t have either R sound or L sound in
Japanese. We have something in between. :wink:

          matz.

On Thu, Apr 10, 2008 at 11:28:59PM +0900, Yukihiro M. wrote:

|or do you use romaji . . . or something that I’ve missed because I didn’t
|get much sleep last night?

We spell UNIX as UNIX for most of the case. We pronounce UNIX as
“ユニックス”, which is YU-NICK-S, just in case you can’t read
Katakana here.

Thanks to both you and T K for your answers. I’m kinda surprised at the
geminate consonant use.

|While I’m at it . . . how is Ruby usually represented in Japanese?

Ruby the language is Ruby. Sometimes people use Katakana (ルビー)
against my intention. We pronounce it as Ru-Bee.

. . . and thanks for that clarification as well.

And most importanly, “Matz” is e$B%^%C%D!#e(B

visit a rubyonrails web site :http://www.rorchina.net

On Apr 10, 2008, at 11:35 AM, Chad P. wrote:

|
Katakana here.
against my intention. We pronounce it as Ru-Bee.

. . . and thanks for that clarification as well.


CCD CopyWrite Chad P. [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
W. Somerset Maugham: “The ability to quote is a serviceable
substitute for
wit.”
Linguistically speaking, Japanese generally do make distinct R and L
sounds and sometimes something in between, but do not distinguish
between them. Romanization generally uses the letter ‘r’ but the
sound could be and in some cases must be and ‘L’ sound.
The cases where it is strictly an ‘L’ sound? rya りゃ ryu りゅ
ryo りょ
As for computer terms, the English word will do unless there is a
Japanese native word that is used 表示 or ひょうじ or
hyouji is “View” as in the View menu. Some words are transliterated
such as “File” ファイル but the English word would generally be
easily read and understood in context. Often the choice is aesthetics.

On Thu, Apr 10, 2008 at 10:59 PM, Arlen C. [email protected] wrote:

The cases where it is strictly an ‘L’ sound? rya e$B$j$ce(B ryu e$B$j$ee(B ryo e$B$j$ge(B

To my experience, it is not strictly an L sound in these sounds at all. I
listen to native Japanese speakers most days at university, and I would say
that it probably varies more on the person and area from which they came.

Arlen

I thought it was more of a soft ‘d’ with the mouth formed for the
following vowel. I took Japanese for a semester, and actually did
pretty well, but forgot most of it know. IIRC, an ending ‘s’ is often
done with the ‘tsu’ character.

Todd

Hi,

On Fri, Apr 11, 2008 at 1:33 PM, John J. <
[email protected]> wrote:

Linguistically speaking, Japanese generally do make distinct R and L
sounds and sometimes something in between, but do not distinguish between
them. Romanization generally uses the letter ‘r’ but the sound could be and
in some cases must be and ‘L’ sound.
The cases where it is strictly an ‘L’ sound? rya りゃ ryu ã‚Šã‚… ryo りょ

To my experience, it is not strictly an L sound in these sounds at all.
I
listen to native Japanese speakers most days at university, and I would
say
that it probably varies more on the person and area from which they
came.

Arlen

It’s neither R nor L.

It took me about 6 to 12 months to fully be able to say it.

It starts with your tongue in the retroflex “r” position of New-Yorker
accent for the R sound (ie tongue tip back), then you flap the tip of
your tongue across the roof of your mouth as you make a sort of “d”
sound (but not plosive, which is unlike d - in other words, not a puff
of air to initiate the sound from a stopped-air position - the puff of
air comes from the back of your throat, with your vocal cords
vibrating.) The sides of your tongue need to be in an “l” position (ie
wide, and each side against your teeth).

It’s not easy to do all the time. Add to the fact that sometimes it
goes to what is WAY more like an L sound in natural japanese speech,
and you have yourself a fun little bundle of joy that is the japanese
“r/l” sound.

Julian.

Learn Ruby on Rails! Check out the FREE VIDS (for a limited time)
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On Thu, Apr 10, 2008 at 11:17 PM, Chad P. [email protected]
wrote:

Be gentle. My nihongo isn’t so good.


CCD CopyWrite Chad P. [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
Phillip J. Haack: “Productivity is not about speed. It’s about velocity.
You can be fast, but if you’re going in the wrong direction, you’re not
helping anyone.”

Look at some Japanese book covers.

http://www.oreilly.co.jp/books/unix/

Harry

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